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THE 

PICTORIAL HISTORY 

OF FORT WAYNE 

INDIANA 



A REVIEW OF 

TWO CENTURIES OF OCCUPATION OF THE 

REGION ABOUT THE HEAD OF THE 

MAUMEE RIVER 

By 
B. J. GRISWOLD 



ILLUSTRATED 

WITH HALFTONE ENGRAVINGS 
AND THREE HUNDRED PEN DRAWINGS AND MAPS 

BY THE AUTHOR 



VOLUME II. BIOGRAPHICAL 



ALSO THE STORY 
OF THE TOWNSHIPS OF ALLEN COUNTY 

BY 

MRS. SAMUEL R. TAYLOR 



CHICAGO 

Robert O. Law Company 

1917 






"'''-' w 'r.\ : ^ 



TilZ NEV/ YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

R 10'^ 7 L 






» « • ' • . I » 1 . » 



Publisher's Statement 



In issuing these volumes to our subscribers the publishers desire to 
say a word of appreciation for the editor, Mr. B. J. Griswold. In the 
course of a long service in like publications, and after laboring with 
hundreds of writers and editors in many parts of the country, it remains 
to Mr. Griswold to be esteemed by us the most eflBcient and in every 
way the most satisfactory person with whom it has been our province 
to be associated in a similar line of endeavor. Although relatively a 
newcomer to Fort Wayne, he has, nevertheless, been able to bring to 
his work an enthusiasm which usually comes only through long years 
of intimate association with the locality that is the subject of research. 
His talents have richly equipped him for preserving not only the verbal 
story but also the scenic part; and herein is where most histories, both 
local and general, are remarkably incomplete. The embelishments of 
these volumes alone make this work unique and valuable, and we enter- 
tain no doubt that they will be appreciated and long cherished by those 
who have been fortunate enough to anticipate their worth. 

Mr. Griswold was born October 13, 1873, at Osage, Iowa, the son of 
James J. and Ruth Velerie (Arnold) .Griswold, who still reside there. 
The father was born in Canada, and the mother in Michigan. After 
leaving the public school, B. J. Griswold began his newspaper experience 
in the office of the Osage Weekly News, and was afterward engaged on 
the staffs of the Waterloo (Iowa) Courier, the Cedar Rapids (Iowa) 
Gazette, the Terre Haute (Indiana) Tribune, and the Indianapolis (Indi- 
ana) Star. He came to Fort Wayne in 1902 and served for nine years as 
a cartoonist of the Fort Wayne Daily News, and later was engaged in 
the same capacity with the Fort Wayne Sentinel. Previous to the latter 
experience he became one of the founders of the Fort Wayne Engraving 
Company. His present business, the Progressive Advertising Company, 
was established in 1914. On March 21, 1901, Mr. Griswold was united in 
marriage with Miss Clara Louise Norton, at Cedar Falls, Iowa. Mr. 
Griswold is an active member of the Rotary Club, of which he is serving 
as secretary, and of the Quest Club and the Commercial Club. He is a 
Scottish Rite Mason and a member of Plymouth Congregational church. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



Index to Portraits in This Volume 



Barnett, Charles Eldridge 39 

Bash, Charles S 43 

Bass, John H 45 

Bass, John H., Residence 48 

Bowser, Sylvanus F. 82 

Breen, William P 87 

Breuer, William 90 

Curdes, Louis F 120 

Deihl, Hugh M 125 

Dreibelbiss, John 144 

Duemling, Hermann A 148 

Eekart, Fred 153 

Ellison, Thomas E 160 

Eward, Edgar D 169 

Foster, David N 187 

Foster, Samuel M 190 

Fox, Louis 194 

Guldlin, Olaf N 243 

Hackett, Edward A. K 252 

Hadley, Robert 256 

Haffner, Christian 257 

Hanna, Samuel 264 

Hayden, Fred J 279 

Hoffman, Edward G 295 

Klaehn, W. Robert 333 

Klitzke, William C 335 

Kunkle, Erastus B 344 

Lumbard, Sidney C 365 

Menefee, Charles M 392 

Morris, John 408 

Morris, Samuel L., Jr 409 

Perfect, Arthur H 442 

Pidgeon, Charles T 447 

Porter, Miles F 452 

Rockhill, Howell C 480 

Rosenthal, Isaac M 489 

Rosenthal, J. Milton 491 

Rosenthal, Maurice 1 492 

Rurode, Ernst C 495 

Swinney, Thomas W 563 

Taylor, Robert S 564 

Vesey, William J 582 

Welty, Joel 604 

Worden, Charles H 620 

Worden, James L 622 



Biographical Sketches 



George F. Aichele is senior member of the firm of Aichele & Son, 
"whicli conducts in Fort Wayne a substantial and representative business 
in the manufacturing and handling of cemetery monuments of the best 
modern type, and the concern has acknowledged leadership in this line 
of enterprise in Allen county, with a large and well equipped establish- 
ment that has the best of facilities for the handling of all classes of monu- 
mental and other enduring memorial work on sacred grounds, con- 
secrated to those who have passed forward to "that undiscovered 
country from whose bourne no traveler returns." Mr. Aichele was born 
in Wurtenberg, Germany, August 23, 1851, and was a child of three 
years when he came with his parents to the United States, the voyage 
across the Atlantic having been made on an old-time sailing vessel of 
the type then commonly in commission for such transportation service. 
The family home was established in Kendallville, and there the subject 
of this review acquired his early education in the public schools. In 
1881 he established his home in Fort Wayne and found employment in 
connection with the line of business of which he is now a prominent 
representative. He learned the trade of marble and granite cutting in 
a most thorough way and he has here been established in his indepndent 
business as a manufacturer of and dealer in cemetery monuments, grave- 
stones, markers, etc., since 1894, the enterprise, built up on the best of 
service and honorable methods, being now conducted under the firm 
name of Aichele & Son. Mr. Aichele is a man of broad views and well 
fortified opinions, takes loyal interest in public affairs of local order 
and gives his political support to the Socialist party, though he has never 
had any desire for political activity or public office. In addition to his 
business he is the owner of valuable real estate in Fort Wayne, in- 
cluding his attractive home property. In the state of New York, in 1874, 
Mr. Aichele wedded Miss Marie Scheymentki, and they became the 
parents of three children : Wilhelmina D., Clarence, who is a barber and 
resident of Fort Wayne, and August C, who is associated with his 
father in business, as junior member of the firm of Aichele & Son. 

John H. Aiken is another of the native sons of Allen county M'hose 
ability, ambition and character have brought to him established position- 
as one of the successful and representative members of the bar of the 
county, and his precedence has been shown also by his able administra- 
tion on the bench of the superior court of Allen county, a position of which 
he was the incumbent about two years. Since his retirement from this 
judicial office he has given his undivided attention to his substantial and 
important general law business, and he maintains his offices in the 
Swinney building. Fort Wayne. Judge Aiken was born in Lafayette 
township, this county, on the 19th of January, 1870, and is a son of John 
and Martha J. (Trainer) Aiken, the former of whom was born either 
in Pennsylvania or Eastern Ohio, and the latter was born in one of the 
eastern counties of the old Buckeye State. John Aiken came to Allen 



18 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

county in 1860 and established his home in Lafayette township, where 
he owned and improved a good farm. After the lapse of a number of 
years he sold this property and, after passing an interval in the state of 
Tennessee, returned to Allen county and engaged in farming in Lake 
township. He was a Democrat in politics, served as county assessor, and 
was influential in community affairs. A man of the deepest Christian 
faith and practice, he served many years as a local preacher in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, and both he and his wife passed the closing years 
of their lives in Fort Wayne, the subject of this review being the 
youngest of their eight children. John H. Aiken passed the period 
of his childhood and early youth on the home farm and after profiting 
duly by the advantages of the public schools he took a course in the old 
Methodist College in Fort Wayne. In consonance vnih his well defined 
ambition to prepare himself for the legal profession, he entered the law 
department of the great University of Michigan, in which he was gradu- 
ated as a member of the class of 1891 and from which he received his 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. In May of that year he was admitted to 
the Indiana bar and established himself in the practice of his profession 
in Fort Wayne. He was for a time associated with M. V. B. Spencer, 
and thereafter he conducted an independent practice until 1905, when 
he formed a partnership with Homer C. Underwood. This alliance con- 
tinued until 1908, when Judge Aiken removed to Warsaw, the judicial 
center of Kosciusko county, where for the ensuing three years he was 
associated in practice with Judge A. G. Wood. He then returned to 
Fort Wayne, and here his law business has since been of an individual 
order. As a skilled trial lawyer he has appeared in connection with much 
important litigation in the various courts of this section of the state, and 
from 1900 until November, 1902, he gave most effective service on the 
bench of the Superior court of the county, from which office he retired 
to give his undivided attention to his large and representative private 
law business. In 1896 he was appointed county attorney for the poor, 
and of this position he continued the incumbent four years. In politics 
Judge Aiken is a stalwart and well fortified advocate of the cause of 
the Democratic party, and he is actively affiliated with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, in which he has received the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite, besides being identified with the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also a Knight Templar. On the 1st of Septem- 
ber, 1891, was recorded the marriage of Judge Aiken to Miss Lulu Bush, 
daughter of Dr. ^Morton W. Bush, of Chelsea, Michigan, and the one 
child of this union is Arthur L., who is now a resident of the city of 
Detroit, Michigan. 

William Albersmeyer is a native German, born on Neveraber 15, 
1873, son of Fred and Elizabeth (Heine) Albersmeyer. The father died 
in Germany and, in 1883, his widow took her family of seven children 
and came to America, settling in Fort Wayne, where she passed the 
remainder of her life. The sons and daughters were Fred, Charles, Christ, 
William, Minnie, Lizette and Hannah. William Avas sent to live with an 
uncle in Milan township, after the family located in Fort Wayne, and 
there had such educational advantages as the public scliools offered. He 
was still in his teens when he took up farming on his oAvn lookout and has 
since continued to be actively identified with that industry, enjoying 
a pleasureable degree of success and acquiring possession of ninety acres 
of the most fertile and productive land in the township. He bought 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 19 

unimproved land and has himself carried on the difficult task of bringing 
it up to its present high state of cultivation, and his work along the 
lines of diversified farming is highly creditable to him. Mr. Albersmeyer 
was married, in 1901, to Miss Sophia Dressier, daughter of August 
Dressier. Four children have come to them — Esther, Iraogard, Elmer 
and Gertrude. The family have membership in the German Lutheran 
church and Mr. Albersmeyer is an adherent of the Democratic party 
in politics. 

Samuel Rockwell Alden. — Thirty-eight years have passed since 
Samuel R. Alden established himself in the practice of law in Fort Wayne. 
In these years he has been a participant in many of the developing pro- 
cesses that have gone to make that place the prosperous and representa- 
tive American city it is known to be, and his labors have won for him 
a position and prominence that might well be envied by his associates. 
Samuel Rockwell Alden was born in South Wilbraham, Massachusetts, 
on August 30, 1847, and he is the son of Harlow and Mary Ann (Imson) 
Alden. Harlow Alden was born in Lyme, New Hampshire. An inventor, 
dreamer and all-round mechanic, he never made a financial success, 
though expert in carpentry, cooperage and cabinet work. Disabled during 
the civil war, in service as sapper and miner, he could not help his son. 
The mother, spiritual, educated, and energetic, was the formative force 
in the education and development of her son, and by teaching she was 
for years the family support. Of mixed descent — English, Scotch, Welsh, 
German, Dutch and Irish — Samuel R. Alden is a typical American and 
the twelfth in line from John Alden of Mayflower fame. He came with 
his parents to Whitewater, Wisconsin, when a small boy and attended 
the schools in that place. When he had finished his high school course 
he entered Beloit College, at Beloit, Wisconsin, but his studies were 
broken off as the result of an injury he sustained in an attempt to stop a 
runaway. When the Normal School opened at Whitewater, his home 
town, young Alden began to attend, though he was still suffering from 
his accident and was able to get about only on crutches. Shortly after 
that he was appointed to the position of instructor in certain subjects, 
and for two years taught advanced English and Elocution. His next post 
was as assistant in Mathematics to Prof. Horace Briggs, at the Buffalo 
Classical School, a preparatory school for boys. Mr. Alden continued 
there for two years and in 1874 he went abroad to continue his studies. 
He attended the University of Leipsic for a year and then entered the 
University of Heidelberg, after which he spent several months in study 
in Paris. Returning to his native country he entered Columbia Law 
School, and he completed a two year course in one year. His admission 
to the bar of the state of Wisconsin followed shortly afterward and in 
1878 he came to Fort Wayne, where he has since been engaged in civil 
practice, enjoying a marked degree of success and prosperity. Mr. Alden 
is a prominent Republican and a member of the Baptist church. He has 
been a Scottish Rite Mason since 1890 and is a member of the Shrine. 
He has long been a staunch member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, 
and for several years served as president of its predecessor, the Fort 
Wayne Club. In December, 1884, Mr. Alden was married to Carrie Savin, 
the daughter of Auguste F. and Sarah J. (Staniford) Savin, of New York 
City, where Mrs. Alden was born. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Alden. Whiting, the eldest, is a forester, in the employ 
of the Canadian Pacific railway and stationed at Calgary, Alberta, 



20 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Canada. Dorothy is the wife of Fernand Prnssing, a mechanical engineer 
of Chicago, and, like her new-woman sisters, continues her professional 
work after marriage. Spencer Thorndyke, a senior at Cornell University, 
enlisted in the Naval Reserve and is now in the coast patrol guard, sta- 
tioned at Newport, Rhode Island. 

Charles B. Aldrich, recognized as a man of excellent professional 
attainments, has been engaged in the practice of law in Fort Wayne since 
1911 and is one of the prominent and influential younger members of the 
bar of Allen county. A scion of sterling New England colonial ancestry, 
he was born at Chattanooga, Massachusetts, on June 12, 1885, and is a 
son of Charles T. and Susetta (Milan) Aldrich. After due preliminary 
educational discipline he entered historic old Yale University, and in this 
institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1906 and with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In preparation for his chosen profession 
he was matriculated in the Chattanooga Law School, in the city of Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee, and from the same he received his degree of Bachelor 
of Laws in the year 1908. In 1910 he completed an efiPective post-graduate 
course in the law school of Yale University, but he had been admitted to 
the Indiana bar in the year that recorded his graduation in the Chatta- 
noosra Law School. In 1911 he engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Fort Wayne, and since January 1, 1916, has here been a member of 
the strong and representative law firm of Ryan, Ryan & Aldrich, which 
controls a substantial and important practice. Mr. Aldrich is a popular 
member of the Allen County Bar Association and holds membership also 
in the Indiana State Bar Association. His political allegiance is given 
to the Democratic party, he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic 
church, and he is af^liated with the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent 
& Protective Order of Elks and the Improved Order of Red Men. On 
the 9th of July, 1912, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Aldrich to Miss 
Juanita Ryan, of Fort Wayne, and the one child of this union is a son, 
William. 

Right Rev. Herman Joseph Alerding", the present bishop of the dio- 
ce-^e of Fort Wayne, has been the occupant of that exalted station since 
his consecration, November 30, 1900, and under his administration the 
diocese has flourished, the churches have been increased in members, 
church properties improved, and all kindred interests have progressed 
most satisfactorily. Bishop Alerding was born in Westphalia, Germany, 
April 13, 1845, and while he was as yet an infant the familj' migrated 
to America, establishing a home at Newport, Kentucky, where the future 
Bishop attended the parochial schools of Corpiis Christi church. Bishop 
Alerding relates that all the children of the parish, boys and girls, num- 
bering about one hundred and fifty, were taught in one room, by one 
teacher, which is in striking contrast with the schools of the present 
day. The education was in every respect strenuous, but the youthful 
Alerding persisted in his studies, as he had, from his earliest boyhood 
days, evinced an inclination and a desire to beco)ne a priest. He received 
his first lessons in Latin from Rev. John VoU, pastor of Corpus Christi 
church at Newport, and from 1858 until 1859 attended the diocesan 
seminary at Vincennes, Indiana. The second year of his studies was 
spe 't in the old St. Thomas Seminary, near Bardstown, Kentucky, and 
in the fall of I860 he was sent to St. Meinrad's College and Seminary 
in Spencer county, Indiana, which institution was conducted by Bene- 
dictine Fathers who had come to this country from Einsiedlen, Switzer- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 21 

land. There young Alerding finished his studies and received the Holy 
Orders from Bishop de St. Palais, the Tonsure and Minor Orders being 
received on September 18, 1865, Subdeaconship on June 18, 1867, Deacon- 
ship on June 21 of the same year and Priesthood on September 22, 1868. 
After receiving the Holy Orders his first appointment was that of assist- 
ant to the Rev. John B. Chasse at St. Joseph's church, in Terre Haute, and 
there he remained until October 18, 1871. While serving there in that 
capacity he also had charge of the missions at Rockville and Montezuma, 
the stations at Rosedale in Parke county and the mission at Sullivan 
and the station at Farmersburg, in Sullivan county. He was removed 
to Cambridge City, October 18, 1871, and there he served as the pastor 
of St. Elizabeth's church until August, 1874. He found a demoralized 
congregation in this place, but he was able to liquidate the indebted- 
ness on the church property and also to purchase a more favorable site 
for the erection of a new church building. During his pastorate in 
Cambridge City he also had charge of the station at Knightstown 
and Newcastle, in Henry county, and Hagerstown, in Wayne county. 
The churches at Knightstown and Newcastle were built by him and 
■wholly paid for. In the summer of 1874, Father Alerding was transferred 
to Indianapolis and appointed to the position of procurator for the 
newly established St. Joseph's seminary, also serving as pastor for the 
congregation which had regular services in the seminary chapel. The 
seminary was abandoned after one year, and later Father Alerding was 
directed to build a new church. In compliance the present St. Joseph's 
church was erected and the dedicatory services were held on July 4, 
1880. Father Alerding continued as pastor of this charge until 1900, 
wh-^n the See of Fort Wayne became vacant upon the death of Bishop 
Rademacher, and Father Alerding was appointed to the position, the 
consecration taking place on November 30 of the same year. In 1901, 
the first year of his administration, the Bishop's House, at the corner 
of Lewis and Clinton streets, was erected, and in 1906 a crypt for the 
burial of church dignitaries was constructed beneath the sanctuary. 
In 1883 Bishop Alerding published "A History of the Catholic Church 
in the Diocese of Vincennes," which book " is a monument to his indus- 
try and untiring patience," and in 1907 he published "The Diocese of 
Fort Wayne; a Book of Historical Reference," which increased the 
debt of gratitude owed him by the thousands of interested members of 
the Mother Church. 

John D. Alleger, proprietor of the Monroeville Breeze and Nestor 
of the Press in Allen county, was born in Danville, Pennsylvania, August 
24, 1854. The year following his birth the parents came to Allen 
county, and here he has spent his life from that time to the present. 
The first home of the family was in a small house which stood on the 
grounds now a part of Concordia College. The father owned and oper- 
ated a portable sawmill and thus it came about that Mr. Alleger lived 
in various parts of the county. Acquiring only a rudimentary education, 
he early began that course of industry which has become a settled charac- 
teristic. He went through the bootblack and newsboy period of busi- 
ness, in the former of which he was the first in the city, and in his 
early 'teens was a coachman for Hon. Hugh McCulloch. In 1869 he 
took up the printer's calling in the old Fort Wayne Gazette office 
and with slight variation he has been identified with the newspaper 
business of the county since that time. He worked for three years 



22 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

in the Monroeville Democrat office and then returned to Fort Wayne, 
where he remained until 1881, when he resumed his connection in Mon- 
roeville. He bought the Democrat, January 1, 1884, and at once changed 
the name to the Breeze, by Avhich it has been known ever since. He 
was then without funds, but was enabled to purchase it through the 
aid of thirty-three citizens who signed a promissory note for $1,000 — 
on which he borrowed the money. The Breeze has been a consistent 
advocate of Democratic principles though not a slave to partisan rule. 
In February, 1874, was solemnized his marriage with Malinda Wass, 
who has borne him three children, named Mrs. Dovie May Noyer (now 
deceased) ; William R., and Mrs. Elsie Winifred Battenberg. The son 
is now associated with the father in conducting the Breeze and thus 
Mr. Alleger is enabled to give attention to his other interests, among 
which is a fine farm of seventy-one acres near the town. William R. 
was married to Susie E. Filler and they have one son — John Carlton — 
now thirteen years old and a pupil in the high school. Mr. Alleger is, 
as may be inferred, a Democrat in politics and has held the office of 
Justice of the Peace for thirty years and through this has come to be 
known among his acquaintances as Judge Alleger. Fraternally he 
beloncrs to the Masons, I. 0. 0. F., K. of P. and Jr. O. U. A. W. 

Albert C. Alter passed his entire life in Fort Wajaie and was but 
forty years of age at the time of his death, which occurred December 7, 
1912. The succinct biography of any man may be summed up in the terse 
expressions that he was born, he lived and he died, but how much is 
implied aside from this depends upon the man himself and the use he 
makes of his powers, the attitude which is his toward his fellow men. 
Mr. Alter achieved independence and success through his own efforts, 
but over and above this he held himself true and loyal in all of the rela- 
tions of life, expressed his buoyant nature in kindly thoughts and kindly 
deeds, and it may well be said that when he passed from the stage of his 
mortal endeavors the popular estimate of him was shown in the sorrow 
and regret that came to the hearts of a host of friends who had been 
drawn to him during the course of his generous and gracious life. To 
have gained such friends bespeaks the most and best for any man. Albert 
C. Alter was born at Fort Wayne on October 18, 1872, and was a son of 
Nicholas and Barbara (Grotenrath) Alter, the former a native of Fort 
Wayne and the latter of Cleveland, Ohio. The father was one of the 
pioneer shoe merchants of Fort Wayne, where he continued to reside until 
his death and where his widow still maintains her home — at 1040 Lake 
avenue. From an appreciative estimate that was published some time 
prior to the death of Mr. Alter may consistently be taken the follo^\^ng 
quotations: "The subject of this sketch is a living proof of the falsity 
of the assertion that there is nothing in a name. The verb alter, according 
to wise old Noah Webster and a few other authorities, means the same as 
'change,' and this tells in a word just the manner in which Mr. Alter made 
his money. No, he didn't make it on 'change,' as many another man 
has done; he simply made it out of change — small change, pennies, nickels 
and dimes. He started in as a hustling, thrifty ncM'sboy, crying his wares 
on the very corner of which he is now the boss— a splendid example for 
the 'newsies' who congregate there daily and make life interesting for 
those waiting for their cars. We hope they'll all peruse this little story 
and profit thereby. One day Mr. Alter found himself in charge of the 
news stand of the Aveline Hotel. Gradually his prosperity increased 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 23 

until he was able to open the present finely equipped cigar and news 
stand on the busiest corner of the city. All of this and his other evidences 
of prosperity have been accomplished because he tried to treat everybody 
right, not forgetting, of course, Mr. Albert C. Alter." Mr. Alter not 
only thus proved himself a worker when he was a mere boy but he also 
profited duly by the advantages offered in the public schools of his native 
city. As a boy he began to assist in the work of his father's shoe store, 
and later he was for some time employed in the store of A. C. Cott, news 
dealer. His advancement was shown by his presiding over the news 
stands in the Aveline Hotel and the Wayne Hotel, and it was in the year 
1901 that he opened his cigar and news stand at the corner of Calhoun 
and Main streets, where he continued to conduct a prosperous business 
until the time of his death. Mr. Alter was a Democrat in politics, was a 
communicant of the Catholic church, and was affiliated with the Knights 
of Columbus and the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. On the 20th 
of November, 1902, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Alice Hunt, who 
was born and reared in Fort Wayne and who is a daughter of James and 
Mary (Finan) Hunt, the former of whom has been a resident of Fort 
Wayne from the time of his birth and the latter, now deceased, was a 
native of Ohio. Mr. Hunt was for many years one of the successful buyers 
and shippers of live stock in North Indiana and is now living retired in 
Fort Wayne. Mr. and Mrs. Alter became the parents of three children, 
two of whom survive him — Charlotte and Julian. The second child, 
Albert, died in infancy. On the 15th of November, 1915, Mrs. Alter con- 
tracted a second marriage, and her present husband, Harry C. Beekner, a 
native of Fort Wayne, is a commercial traveling salesman for the C. T. 
Pidgeon Millinery Company, of this city. 

Noali Amstutz is one of the energetic and representative farmers 
of the younger generation in his native township, is a scion of one of 
the old and honored families of Allen county, and in his operations as 
an agriculturist and stock-grower is bringing to bear the best of mod- 
ern methods and policies, so that the maximum success attends his farm 
enterprise, besides which he shows his civic loyalty by taking active 
and liberal interest in community affairs. He is a son of Jacob and 
Sophia (Culp) Amstutz, and on other pages of this publication are 
given adequate data concerning the family history. Born in Springfield 
township, December 2, 1882, Noah Amstutz passed the period of his 
childhood and youth under the benignant influences and discipline of 
the home farm and in the meanwhile did not fail to profit fully by 
the advantages of the public schools of his native township. A young 
man of alert mentality and definite ambition, he has never severed his 
allegiance to the great basic industry of agriculture and through the 
medium of the same has achieved success that has fully justified this 
fealty. His independent operations as a farmer were instituted on the 
old homestead, and he is now the owner of a fine farm of one hundred 
and fifty-four acres in Section 32, Springfield township, as well as a 
well-improved additional tract of forty-five acres in Cedar Creek town- 
ship. The year 1917 finds him serving his second term as one of the 
progressive and valued members of the Allen county council, and he 
is aligned as a stalwart advocate and supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity his ancient- 
craft affiliation is with Harlan Lodge No. 296, and he is identified also 
with other York Rite bodies, has received advancement in the Scottish 



24 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Rite and is affiliated also with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. In 1902 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Arastutz to Miss Millie Knight, daughter of Lewis and Christina (Miller) 
Knight, of Milan township, and the four children of this union are 
Kenneth, Jeauette, May and Thelma. The attractive rural home of 
the family is known for its generous hospitality and is about three- 
fourths of a mile distant from the village of Harlan. 

Peter S. Amstutz was born in Springfield township, Allen county, 
September 27, 1853, on the farm that is now his home, so that he has 
a record of sixty-four years of continuous residence in the one spot. 
He is one of the prosperous men of the community, connected prom- 
inently with various business enterprises in his district, and is a man 
highly esteemed of all who know him. He is the son of Peter and 
Barbara (Schulenger) Amstutz, both natives of Alsace, the French 
province in Germany. Peter Amstutz, the elder, came to America when 
he was twenty-two years of age and located in Wayne county, Ohio. His 
marriage took place in Stark county, Ohio, and after several years of 
residence there he came to Allen county, Indiana, in 1852, settling on 
the farm now the home of the subject. Nine children were born to 
Peter and Barbara Amstutz, of which number only two survive. The 
children, named in the order of their birth, were John, Joseph, Jacob, 
Lydia, Barbara, Peter, Jr., Mary, Anna and John, the last named being 
a prosperous citizen of Wayne county, Ohio. The parents spent their 
lives in work on their Allen county farm, and prospered according to 
their labors. When they died the home place went to Peter, Jr., the 
only other surviving child being established in Wayne county, as has 
been stated previously. When young Amstutz was eighteen years old 
he engaged in the implement business, using the home place as a center 
for his operations. In 1901 the Wabash Railroad, cutting through 
Springfield township, made Grabill a busy center and Mr. Amstutz 
moved his business to that point. He has carried on a successful trade 
in farm implements these many years, besides having found many other 
important enterprises to identify himself with. He is president of a 
successful lumber company, director of the People's Store Company 
and a director of the Woodburn Banking Company, of which concern 
he was one of the organizers. He is also a stockholder in the Harlan 
State Bank. In 1879 Mr, Arastutz was married to Anna Roth, who 
was born in Allen county, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Souder) 
Roth. Mr. and Mrs. Roth were the parents of five children, of which 
Mrs. Amstutz was the eldest. The others were Levi, Elizabeth, Lydia 
and Louisa. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Amstutz. Aaron, 
the eldest, is located on a farm near Harlan, Delbert G. is also located 
in that vicinity as a farmer. Harvey is on the old home place. Emma 
is the wife of Albert Neuenschwander, of Grabill, and Viola, the youngest, 
is at home with her parents. In 1903 the wife and mother died and in 
later years Mr. Amstutz married Lydia Grabill, who has since shared 
his fortunes. Mr. Amstutz is a Republican, prominent in local politics, 
and a public-spirited citizen first and last. He has served his community 
ably as a director of the school board and has been supervisor of his 
township on several occasions, as well as holding other township offices 
from time to time. In all of them he has displayed an aptitude for public 
service and has amply earned the regard and esteem in which he has 
long been held by his fellow citizens and neighbors. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 25 

Charles Ashley. — As senior member of the firm of George L. Ashley's 
Sons, the subject of this review is one of the progressive and 
successful representatives of the real estate business in his native county, 
and since the death of their honored father he and his brother, George S., 
have successfully conducted the substantial business that was founded 
by the father after he had retired from the office of county recorder, 
the family having been one of prominence in Allen county for three 
generations. Charles Ashley was born on a farm in St. Joseph township, 
this county, a few miles distant from Fort Wayne, and the date of his 
nativity was March 11, 1876. He is a son of George L. and Josephine 
(Darling) Ashley, the former of whom was born and reared in this 
county, where his parents settled in the pioneer days, and the latter was 
born at Keene, New Hampshire. The parents of George L, Ashley settled 
in Allen county as pioneers and his father here became a prosperous 
farmer, with which line of basic industry he continued to be identified 
until his death. George L. was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm 
and in his independent operations as an agriculturist and stockgrower 
he eventually became the owner of one of the model farms of St. Joseph 
township. To the management of this homestead he continued to give 
his attention until he was elected county recorder, in the autumn of 1904, 
his inviolable hold upon popular confidence and esteem having been 
significantly shown in this connection, as he successfully overcame at the 
polls the large and normal Democratic majority and had the distinction 
of being the only Republican elected to this office in the county during 
the entire period of its history. He assumed the duties of the office Janu- 
ary 1, 1905, and his able administration during the ensuing four years 
fully demonstrated the consistency of the popular choice of an incumbent. 
After retiring from office he established himself in the real estate business 
in Fort Wayne, and his exact and comprehensive knowledge of realty 
values in this section of the state combined with his executive ability and 
personal popularity to fortify him splendidly in the development of a 
substantial business, his two sons having been associated with him in the 
enterprise which they have effectively continued since his death. George 
L. Ashley was a man of broad mental ken, of invincible rectitude in all 
of the relations of life, and held himself true to his high ideals until he 
passed from the stage of his mortal endeavors, January 5, 1916, the wife 
of his youth having passed away on the 7th of January, 1879, leaving one 
son, the immediate subject of this sketch. Mrs. Ashley was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, as was also her husband. He married, 
second, Addessa M. Miller and she bore him the following children : Olive 
E., wife of Arthur J. Smith, of Fort Wayne ; Oscar J., died in 1913 ; George 
S., junior member of the real estate firm of George L. Ashley's Sons, and 
Josephine Margaret, wife of Calvin C. Magley, of Fort Wayne. He 
married, third, Mrs. Zella Culber, who survives him. Mr. Ashley attained 
to the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of 
Masonry, and it is pleasing to note that he was treasurer of the class of 
1912, in which he and his three sons simultaneously received the thirty- 
second degree and were duly crowned sublime princes of the royal secret. 
In the public schools of his native county Charles Ashley continued his 
studies until he had duly availed himself of the advantages of the high 
school in Fort Wayne, after which he completed a course in a well ordered 
business college in this city. He continued to be associated in the work 
and management of the home farm until he was twenty-four years old 



26 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

and when his father was elected county recorder he assumed a position 
in the recorder's ofifice, in which he served as his father's deputy during 
the latter 's regime of four years, after which he became a member of 
the firm of George L. Ashley & Sons, in the real estate business in Fort 
Wayne. After the death of the honored father the present title of George 
L. Ashley's Sons was adopted, and the firm controls a well ordered and 
substantial business in the handling of both city and farm property in this 
section of the state. Mr. Ashley holds himself unwavering in allegiance 
to the Republican party, and in addition to his affiliation with the Masonic 
fraternity, as previously intimated, he is identified also with the Tribe 
of Ben Hur, both he and his wife being members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. In 1900 was recorded his marriage to Miss Jessie V. Sweet, 
who was born and reared in Fort Wayne, and they have two children — 
Charles L. and Marjorie R. 

Mark Ashton, who was born in Maumee township, January 11, 1876, 
is now numbered among the representative exponents of agricultural 
and live-stock industry in this township, his excellent farm, comprising 
seventy-five acres, being well improved and eligibly situated. Mr. Ashton 
is a son of Ambrose and Mary Annie (Cummins) Ashton, both natives of 
Ohio, the former having been born in Brown county and the latter in 
Clermont county, and both having been children at the time of the removal 
from the old Buckeye state to become pioneer settlers of Allen county, 
Indiana. After their marriage Ambrose Ashton and his young wife estab- 
lished their home on a farm in Maumee township, and there they passed 
the remainder of their earnest and industrious lives, the passing years 
bringing to them a consistent measure of prosperity, the while they had 
inviolable place in the esteem of all who knew them. They became the 
parents of seven children, and all are living except Clark, who was a 
twin of the subject of this sketch and who died at an early age, and 
Clarence F., the youngest of the number, who is also deceased. The sur- 
viving children are George F., Mrs. Nellie A. Doerring, Joseph L., Mrs. 
Lily D. Keefer, and Mark. The honored father passed from the stage 
of Lis mortal endeavors December 24, 1895, the devoted wife and mother 
having been summoned to eternal rest October 3, 1892. Ambrose Ashton 
played a large and benignant part in the community life, commanded 
unqualified confidence and esteem, served as township trustee of Maumee 
township, and for a number of years held the office of justice of the 
peace. Mark Ashton is indebted to the public schools of his native county 
for his early education, and he has been continuously identified v/ith 
agricultural pursuits from the time of his youth, his independent opera- 
tions having been instituted on the old home farm, of which his present 
well improved farm is a part. His political support is given to the 
Republican party, he is a loyal citizen who gives co-operation in the 
furtherance of measures and enterprises advanced for the general good 
of the community, but he has manifested no ambition for public office 
of any kind. November 1, 1900, stands as the date of the marriage of 
Mr. Ashton to Miss Lela H. Burrier, who likewise was born and reared 
in tliis county and who is a member of a family that was here established 
in the early pioneer days. She is a daughter of George and Alice 
(Sanders) Burrier. Mr. and Mrs. Ashton have four children, whose 
names and respective dates of birth are here designated: Florence M., 
December 22, 1903; George B., September 20, 1906; Frances L., January 
30, 1909 ; and Forrest C, December 25, 1912. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 27 

Austin Augspurger is one of the progressive citizens of Maumee 
township, with place of residence at Woodburn, where he is engaged 
in the lumber business and also gives some attention to farming. Mr. 
Augspurger was born, May 23, 1869, and is a scion of a highly respected 
family, a number of members of which are residents of the city of Fort 
Wayne. In the lumber business Mr. Augspurger finds opportunity for 
the exercise of those qualities of thrift and energy with which he is 
abundantly endowed, and his activities add to the general spirit of 
enterprise and endeavor which characterizes the prosperous village of 
Woodburn. 

The Athenaeum — The following interesting treatise on one of Fort 
Wayne's modern educational institutions outlines the scope and the 
accomplishments of The Athenaeum — the Teachers' University of Com- 
merce — which is preparing great numbers of young people for success 
in the business world: "Yesterday's solutions won't solve tomorrow's 
problems. Yesterday's strategies won't surmount tomorrow's obstacles. 
Yesterday's means are not adequate to tomorrow's demands. Men, 
methods, ideas, change with the hour. Humanity moves with the calen- 
dar. Efficiency is the watchword of modern enterprise. To perform a 
task better, and still better than it was ever performed before ; to save 
time ; to eliminate waste ; to husband material ; to conserve human en- 
ergy; all is the keynote of every successful project, be it corporate or 
individual. Tasks which appeared infinite twenty-four hours agone are 
accepted as a common fact a day hence. In the sphere of education, as 
elsewhere, has the spirit of the age been markedly felt. Theory has 
culminated in fact ; speculation has given place to certainty ; concentra- 
tion has displaced sporadic eff'ort; misdirected energies have been de- 
veloped into effective forces ; methods and systems have been subordin- 
ated to results desired. A process of distillation, as it were, has been 
going on. The great fact of existence has been subjected to the care- 
ful scrutiny of the keenest minds, and the result is a scheme of education 
which more and more nearly approaches the practical ; which approxi- 
mates the instruction of the individual to the needs of real life. Hand 
and mind are coming to be trained alike to the solution of the struggles 
which each one must encounter as a sentient being, dependent upon his 
own powers for subsistence. In this condition began the present world- 
wide vocational movement of which the modern commercial training 
institution is a paramountly important part. In the early part of the 
present century, Mr. W. J. Bowker and Mr. A. B. Sheron, with the 
prescience which comes only of strenuous experience, perceived the great 
field open to a school of learning devoted entirely to the higher lines of 
this great branch of vocational effort, commercial education. Still further 
did they realize the splendid results which might accrue to such an 
institution were its student body selected from a class of people whose 
education and experience were entirely compatible with, and a logical 
prerequisite to, the assimilation of such knowledge. The Athenaeum, 
with its splendid body of former teachers in the public schools, was the 
magnificent results. As 'Mighty Oaks from Tiny Acorns Grow', as great 
crusades are born in the development of the few, so do gigantic enter- 
prises unfold themselves from small beginnings. The lofty structure is but 
the duplication of story upon story ; the great is but the small built big. 
The Athenaeum in its incipiency did not differ from a multitude of other 
great works; its beginning was unpretentious. He who would achieve 
by new methods must often batter to a breach a granite wall of precon- 



28 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

ceived opinion and bias prejudice which will try his soul to the utter- 
most. With men and states, progress sometimes means near-revolution. 
The world acknowledges but grudgingly a victory in the winning of 
which she was not invited to actively participate. In this also, the 
Athenaeum was like to pioneers in other fields who left the broad avenues 
and blazed new trails ; storms often clouded the skies of its earlier days. 
It promulgated a new plan of education. It held forth a new idea of 
instruction to the youth, that which eliminated all which did not di- 
rectly bear upon the pursuit in which he purposed to win his subsistence; 
all which was not a pertinent and necessary part thereof being discarded. 
It sought patronage from only an adult class of students, whose age, 
previous education and experience had peculiarly fitted them to enter 
upon the study of higher commerce with a full realization of the re- 
sponsibilities thereof. In this last its student body was finally limited 
to those individuals who had formerly been teachers in the public 
schools, and who by reason of such previous employment were most 
free from undesirable or deterrent temperamental characteristics. Still 
another departure from the beaten paths was inaugurated in that the 
institution offered a plan of study to be followed by the student at his 
home, without the immediate presence of the instructor. Thus were the 
benefits of the work of the institution placed within the reach of those 
who, by reason of insufficient financial means were unable to cease their 
daily employment, and who might otherwise have been prevented from 
ever securing the education of their choice. With a meagre number of 
students as a nucleus, class followed upon class; year succeeded year; 
time sped on as only time can to those whose waking hours are filled 
with busy toil. With a steadfast faith in the everlasting correctness of 
its ideals, the institution forged steadily ahead with an ever-widening 
influence. First from adjacent counties, then from neighboring states, 
and finally from far-distant places over the entire country came patrons, 
leaders of their respective communities. In like degree was the staff of 
the institution increased by the addition of members especially trained 
to perform the duties assigned to them, until the present organization 
of nearly three score instructors, secretaries, division superintendents 
and assistants was perfected. Today, wherever commercial education 
is known and accepted throughout this broad land, The Athenaeum 
stands forth to beckon the ambitious on toward greater accomplish- 
ment. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Canada to the Gulf, come 
splendid types of men and women to secure the superior benefits to be 
derived from the magnificent organization of the institution and the 
unbounded enthusiasm which pervades its every member. With an in- 
comparable student body of former teachers, results are being ac- 
complished which until the most recent years would have been deemed 
incredible. Here, indeed, has a new standard of business education been 
unfurled to the world of commerce ; here has leadership been won and 
maintained by the soundest of doctrines — Progress — Efficiency — At- 
tainment." 

Alfred T. Bailey is one of the three executive principals of the Ban- 
ner Laundering Company and has been an energetic and resourceful 
factor in the development and upbuilding of the prosperous and repre- 
sentative business now controlled by this company, which has one of the 
most modern and effectively conducted of laundry plants, with facilities 
of metropolitan order, the Banner laundry being one of the largest and 
best equipped in northern Indiana and its effective service having gained 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 29 

and retained to it a representative and appreciative patronage. The 
business had its inception in 1896, when Messrs. Oscar C. Leggett, Ade- 
laide V. Leggett and Alfred T. Bailey opened a modest laundry near ihe 
corner of Woodlawn and Calhoun streets. One year later removal was 
made to 1317 Calhoun street, where the headquarters of the concern ware 
maintained eight years. The business had in the meanwhile greatly ex- 
panded and at the expiration of the period noted the company found it 
virtually necessary to establish larger and better quarters, with the re- 
su t that wise expediency was conserved by the erection of its present 
substantial two-story building, at 425 East Columbia street. The main 
building is forty by eighty-three feet in dimensions, the original engine 
room being thirty-six by thirty feet in dimensions and an addition, 
thirteen by sixteen feet, having been made to the same. Beginning with 
a force of only two assistants, the company now gives employment to 
seventy persons and in the handling of its business nine of the best met- 
ropolitan type of wagons are utilized. Oscar C. Leggett, one of the hon- 
ored founders of this important enterprise, continued his association 
with the same until his death, which occurred April 26, 1916, and the 
interested principals of the firm are now Adelaide V. Leggett, Alfred T. 
Bailey, and Grace E. Bailey. In August, 1915, the company was in- 
corporated under the laws of Indiana and with a capital stock of twenty- 
five thousand dollars. Alfred T. Bailey was born in Eaton county, 
Michigan, on August 26, 1869, and acquired his early education i'l the 
public schools of Ingham county, that state. His initial business experi- 
ence was gained as clerk in a general merchandise store at Lansing. 
Later he held a clerical position in the postoffice at that place, and finally 
he gained two years of practical and effective experience in the lau^idry 
business. In 1896 he came to Fort Wayne and became one of the founders 
of the Banner Laundering Company, of which he has remained one o1' the 
interested principals to the present time, his close application to nisi- 
ness having not precluded his taking a loyal interest in civic affair and 
in doing his part to further the advancement of his home. He is actively 
identified with the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and the Rotary lub, 
and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. He and his wife are popu- 
lar in the social activities of Fort Wayne, Mrs. Bailey, whose maiden 
name w^as Grace Davis, having been a resident of this city at the time 
of their marriage. Their children are Robert L. and Grace Elizabeth. 

J. Wade Bailey was born in Newtonville, Essex county, INlassa- 
chusetts, on August 29, 1879, and is a son of Joseph Tilden and Mabel 
(Allen) Bailey, both natives of the old Bay state, and both coming from 
families that date their respective ancestries back to the first settlement 
of the new world, so that Mr. Bailey may safely claim a purely American 
genealogy. The elder Bailey was engaged in the banking business in 
Boston for many years. J. Wade Bailey had his early education in his 
native city, and when he was graduated from the Newton high school 
he entered the employ of Fenno Brothers & Childs, then the largest wool 
dealers in the United States. This firm later sold out to Hartley 
Brothers, a firm composed of three London and two American merchants, 
and it may be said in passing that during the panic in the wool market 
in 1909 this firm failed for about a million and a half dollars. Following 
that failure Mr. Bailey became connected with the United States Fastener 
Company, of Boston, and after a year in the Boston offices of the firm he 
went to Chicago to look after the middle west end of the business, mak- 
ing his headquarters in Chicago for about two and a half years. He 



30 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

left the employ of that firm to engage in the brokerage business, hand- 
ling manufacturer's lines on a commission basis, and while he was 
sufficiently successful in the work to warrant his continuation with it, 
he gave up the business because of the fact that it necessitated constant 
traveling, a feature that was extremely displeasing to him. Mr. Bailey 
exchanged his brokerage activities for a connection with the Burroughs 
Adding Machine Company of Detroit, and going to Peoria, Illinois, was 
located there for about ten months. He then took a city territory in 
Chicago for the same company, continuing there for six months, when 
the company gave him the agency for Northern Indiana, with head- 
quarters at Fort Wayne. Since locating in that territory Mr. Bailey 
has realized a generous measure of success in his work of popularizing 
a device which he claims is solely for the purpose of general betterment 
of business conditions through the installation of twentieth century 
methods of handling office records, and he believes that the record of 
such machines already placed by the majority of manufacturing, whole- 
sale and banking houses in that locality stands as an endorsement of that 
statement. Mr. Bailey was married in Chicago on June 27, 1912, to Miss 
Florence Tyler, daughter of Edward Tyler, a promoter of Detroit, 
Michigan. They have one daughter, Bertha Bailey, born October 29, 
1913. Mr. Bailey is a Eepublican, and socially is a member of the Rotary 
Club of Fort Wayne. He is also a member of the Commercial Club. 

Andrew J. Baker is a native son of Fort Wayne, is a representative 
of one of the old and honored families of this city, and has been for nearly 
thirty-five years an efficient and valued member of the city fire depart- 
ment, in which he has held the office of captain since 1894. Since 1899 
he has held continuously the office of captain at Fire House No. 7, the 
preceding five years having been marked by his service in a similar 
capacity at Fire House No. 5. Captain Baker was born in Fort Wayne 
on March 6, 1859, and is a son of Henry J. and Mary (Doherty) Baker, 
the former of whom was born in Germany on August 3, 1828, and the 
latter in the city of Rochester, New York, August 26, 1836. Henry J. 
Baker was six years of age at the time of his parents' immigration to 
America and he was reared and educated in Fort Wayne, Indiana. As 
a young man, associated with two of his brothers, he became promi- 
nently concerned with the civic and material interests of Fort Wayne 
and Allen county, and later in life he became a member of the firm of 
Murray & Baker, which developed a prosperous enterprise in the manu- 
facturing of mechanical and gas engines. He engaged also in the real 
estate business and as an exponent of the same did much to further the 
development and upbuilding of the present metropolis of Allen county. 
He laid out the plot of land on which is now located the Pennsylvania 
railroad depot in Fort Wayne, and his name is fittingly honored and 
perpetuated in the title of Baker street, in that section of the city. He 
was also in the saw-mill and general lumber business, and furnished the 
lumber for the Pittsburg Railroad Company shops. For a number of 
years he was superintendent of the Wabash and Erie Canal with head- 
quarters in Fort Wayne, and he was also one of the Directors and a 
stockholder in the Fort Wayne, Jackson and Saginaw Railroad. He was 
essentially a sterling citizen of much energy, progressiveness and versatil- 
ity. This honored pioneer was but forty-four years of age at the time of 
his death, in 1872, and he was influential in public affairs of a local 
order, his allegiance having been given unreservedly to the Democratic 
party, and though he was not a seeker of public office he served at one 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 31 

time as a director of the • northern state penitentiary of Indiana. His 
>vidow survived him for more than thirty years and v^'as nearly seventy 
years of age at the time of her death, in 1904, both having been earnest 
and consistent communicants of the Catholic church. They became the 
parents of nine children : Julia, who was born February 12, 1855, is the 
"wife of Charles E. Stapleford, and they maintain their home in the state 
of Colorado. Mrs. Stapleford is a woman of fine intellectual and literary 
attainments and is the author of an interesting published volume entitled 
"Wahseeola," an Indian word that signifies "The Light of the Tribes 
at the Meeting Waters," and in 1916-17 she is engaged in the prepara- 
tion for publication of another work entitled "Under the Yoke of Con- 
science," that is certain to find popular favor and enduring value. 
Henry J., who was born November 8, 1856, is bookkeeper for the Clifford 
Brothers Coal Company of Fort Wayne. Catherina likewise resides in 
Fort Wayne and is the widow of Victor MuUer. Captain Andrew J., 
of this review, was the next in order of birth. Ambrose C, born July 
22, 1862, still resides in Fort Wayne. Margaret, born April 27, 1864, 
is the wife of August Steinbrunner, of this city. Lawrence A. still 
maintains his home in Fort Wayne, where he was born April 4, 1868. 
Ellen A., born August 25, 1870, died in 1916. Gertrude F., born February 
11, 1872, is the wife of James Orr, of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Cap- 
tain Andrew J. Baker acquired his early education in the Catholic 
parochial schools of Fort Wayne, and as a youth he served an appren- 
ticeship to the baker's trade, as if to make even more consistent the 
name which he bears. He did not long devote his attention to this trade, 
however, and after quitting the same he was for some time in the employ 
of the United States Express Company. In 1883, when twenty-four years 
of age, he became a minuteman in the Fort Wayne fire department, and 
in 1893 he was made a full-pay member of the department. That his 
service and executive ability were of high order was made manifest in 
the following year, when he was promoted to the office of captain and 
assigned to Fire House No. 5, where he remained until 1899, since which 
year he has been captain at Fire House No. 7, as previously noted in this 
context. The Captain is a strict disciplinarian but invariably just and 
considerate, so that he has the implicit confidence and good will of his 
co-workers and has made an admirable record of service as one of the 
resourceful and courageous fire-fighters of his native city. His political 
affiliation is with the Democratic party and he attends and supports 
the Catholic church, in the faith of which he was reared and of which 
his wife is a zealous communicant. On January 28, 1885, wass olemnized 
the marriage of Captain Baker to Miss Matilda O. Weier, who was born 
in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, and who is a daughter of Martin and 
Amelia (Weaineer) Weier, both natives of Germany. The name of 
Mrs. Weier 's first husband was Richter, and the one child of this union 
is Benjamin Richter, who is employed as a tinner by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company. Martin Weier, a tanner by trade, established his 
residence in Fort Wayne in 1861, and here both he and his wife passed 
the remainder of their lives. Of their six children Louis J. and Eleanor 
are deceased ; Mrs. Baker was the third and was reared and educated in 
Fort Wayne; Mollie is the wife of Frederick W. Yeager, of Chicago; 
Hattie is deceased, and Anthony is a resident of North Dakota. Captain 
and Mrs. Baker have but one child, Louis A., who is now a successful 
and popular traveling salesman for the Mossman-Yarnelle Company, 
of Fort Wayne. 



32 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Joseph J. Baker has been a resident of Fort Wayne from the time 
of his birth, is a representative of one of the honored German families 
that was founded in Allen county in the pioneer days, and from his 
youth has been closely and worthily associated with business affairs in 
his native city, where for the long period of thirty-one years he was 
an etricient and valued employe of the United States Express Company, 
with which he remained virtually until this corporation closed up its 
business and retired from the field of enterprise in which it had long 
been a dominating factor. Mr. Baker is now one of the two interested 
principals in the Zurbuch-Baker Coal Company, which controls a pros- 
perous wholesale and retail business and in which his coadjutor is 
Joseph F, Zurbuch, concerning whom individual mention is made 
on other pages of this volume. Joseph J. Baker was born in Fort 
"Wayne, December 29, 1860, a son of Jacob and Agatha (Mayer) Baker, 
the former of whom was born in Hesse- Darmstadt, Germany, and the 
latter in Geisingeny, a town of the German grand duchy of Baden. 
Jacob Baker came to America as a young man, about the year 1839, 
and soon afterward became a resident of Fort Wayne, where he engaged 
in the work of his trade, that of wagonmaker, but soon afterward became 
the owner of a sawmill, to the operation of which he gave his attention 
for a term of years, as one of the substantial and valued business men 
of Fort Wayne. In 1878 he retired from active business and was \ en- 
erable in years at the time of his death, in August, 1895, his widow 
having passed to eternal rest on February 4, 1899, and both having 
been zealous communicants of St. Mary's Catholic church, of which he 
was a charter member, his political allegiance having been given to the 
Democratic party. Of the children the eldest is Mary E., who is now 
Sister Helen of the Catholic sisterhood of Notre Dame and is giving 
consecrated service at the present time in the city of St. Louis, Missouri ; 
Joseph J., of this sketch, was the second child; Father Joachim is a 
priest of the Catholic church and holds a pastoral charge at Remington, 
Jasper county, Indiana; and Johanna is the wife of Henry W. Kohr- 
mann, of Fort Wayne. Joseph J. Baker was afforded the advantages 
of the excellent parochial schools of St. Mary's church and as a youth 
entered the employ of the firm of Shaffer & Calbacker, with whom he 
remained three years. He then entered the local service of the United 
States Express Company, in the employ of which corporation he con- 
tinued for thirty-one years, at the expiration of which, in 1914, he 
became associated with Joseph F. Zurbuch, under the present title of 
the Zurbuch-Iiaker Coal Company. He is a loyal and public-spirited 
citizen and takes deep interest in all things pertaining to the welfare 
of his native city and county, the while be is found aligned as a staunch 
supporter of the principles of the Democratic party. Both he and his 
wife are active communicants of St. Mary's Catholic church, in con- 
nection with which he is a member of the Holy Name Society. On No- 
vember 18, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Baker to Miss Eliza- 
beth Miller, daughter of Joseph and Anastasia (Witz) Miller, of Fort 
Wayne, and they have three children — Helen, who is the wife of Thomas 
Harkenriter, of Fort Wayne; Leon J., who is attending the United 
States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, Maryland; and Agneta, who re- 
mains at the parental home. 

Leonard M. Bane — As one generation has followed another on to 
the stage of life Allen county has not failed so to recruit its bar as to 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 33 

maintain at all times a high standard for the same, and the city of Fort 
Wayne has been the home and professional headquarters of many who 
have been distinguished figures in the history of Indiana jurisprudence. 
Leonard Morgan Bane is one of the successful and highly esteemed 
younger members of the Fort Wayne bar, and has been established in 
the practice of his profession in the Allen county metropolis and seat of 
government since the autumn of 1908. His close application and 
recognized ability have resulted in his developing a substantial law busi- 
ness and it is constantly and legitimately increasing in scope and im- 
portance from year to year — a condition that denotes the popular 
estimate placed upon his ability as an advocate and as a well fortified 
counselor. The ancestors of the Bane family came to Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania, in the year 1687, from Lancaster, England. The name is 
Scotch-Irish origin. The great-great uncle of Leonard M. Bane on the 
Bane side of the family, was a captain of militia and an Indian fighter 
during the French and Indian war. A great-grandfather, Lot Leonard, 
of the maternal side of Mr. Bane's ancestral line, was a captain in the 
Revolutionary war. The grandfather of Mr. Bane on his mother's side 
was of German descent. Mr. Bane was born in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on November 8, 1880, and is a son of Morgan A. and Mary E. 
(Bowser) Bane, the former of whom was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, May 22, 1845, and the latter in Greene county, that state, 
July 14, 1852. The parents now maintain their home in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, where the father is living virtually retired, he 
having been a successful farmer and also having been for many years 
engaged in practice as a veterinary surgeon. His political allegiance is 
given to the Democratic party and while he has always taken a loyal 
interest in public affairs in his community he has not been a seeker of 
political office, though he held for twelve years the position of school 
director. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and he and his 
wife attend the Christian church. Of the children the eldest is David 
E., who is a resident of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, where he is success- 
fully engaged in the practice of law; Leonard M., of this review, was 
the next in order of birth ; Seth C. resides in the village of Lock No. 4, 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he holds the position of time- 
keeper in the American Wire Mills; Orpha R. is principal of the public 
schools in one of the thriving villages of Fayette county, Pennsylvania; 
Veronia likewise is a successful teacher in that county; Pearl M. is the 
wife of Clyde Swaney, of Washington county, Pennsylvania; John R. 
is engaged in farming near Billings, Montana ; and Joseph H. remains 
at the parental home. Leonard M. Bane acquired his preliminary educa- 
tion in the public schools of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and sup- 
plemented this by an effective course in Madison Academy, at Union- 
town, that state. Thereafter he was a successful and popular teacher 
in the public schools of his native state until he initiated his preparation 
for the legal profession, his service as a teacher having continued for a 
period of six years. He finally came to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he 
entered the law department of the Valparaiso University, in which he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1907, and from which he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, his admission to the Indiana bar 
having been recorded on the 5th of June of that year. On the 13th of 
November, 1908, he began the independent practice of his profession in 
Fort Wayne, and by his ability and effective service he has built up an 
excellent law business that marks him as one of the representative 



34 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

younger members of the Fort Wayne bar. He is affiliated with the In- 
diana State Bar Association and the Allen County Bar Association, and 
he has been admitted to practice in the Indiana supreme court as "well 
as in the United States district court for Indiana. Mr. Bane gives 
unequivocal support to the principles of the Democratic party, and in 
Fort Wayne he attends and contributes to the support of the Christian 
church. In the Masonic fraternity his ancient craft affiliation is with 
Sol D. Bayless Lodge, No. 359, and in the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Eite he has received the thirty-second degree, his maximum York Rite 
affiliation being with Fort Wayne Commandery of Knights Templars, 
besides which he holds membership in the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and is identified with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is an active member and supporter 
of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, and holds membership in the Uni- 
versity Club of Fort Wayne and the International Association of Motor 
clubs. 

Mrs. Carrie B. Banning, M. D. — In according recognition to the 
representative members of the medical profession in Allen county it is 
in order to pay tribute to Dr. Banning, whose services as a physician and 
surgeon have been marked by success. Dr. Banning has been engaged in 
the practice of her profession in Fort Wayne since 1898 and gives virtu- 
ally her entire attention to the treatment of the diseases of women. A 
woman of culture, the Doctor takes active interest in civic affairs, and is 
a woman whose friends are many. Dr. Banning was born at Phelps, 
Ontario county, New York, on the 11th of February, 1857, and is a 
daughter of Dr. Calvin Hasselton and Jeanette K. (DeLano) Carpenter, 
both likewise natives of the old Empire state and both representatives 
of families that were founded in America in the colonial era, the an- 
cestral record of each family running back in this country to 1638 and 
both having given valiant soldiers to the patriot forces in the war of the 
Revolution, so that the Doctor is eligible for and holds membership in 
the Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Dr. Calvin 
Hasselton Carpenter, a physician and surgeon of much ability, served 
with distinction as a surgeon with the Union forces in the Civil war, 
in which he had charge of the Eighteenth Army Corps of the Army of 
the Potomac, besides having had supervision of hospital boats on the 
James river, in Virginia. After the close of the war he engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Geneva, New York, where he became one 
of the leading exponents of the Allopathy school of medicine and where 
he died when still a young man, his widow surviving him by many years ; 
his father was one of the prominent clergymen of the Baptist church in 
the state of New York for many years prior to his death. Dr. Banning, 
of this sketch, is the elder of the two children, and her only brother, 
Jay DeLano Carpenter, died at the age of eleven years. Dr. Banning 
acquired her early education in well ordered private schools and later 
attended the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. She likewise gave 
effective service as a teacher in the public schools, and on February 11, 
1879, she became the wife of Edmond P. Banning. Within a period of 
five years' residence in the city of Boston, Massaclmsettes, she gave 
special attention to the study of vocal music. Eventually she determined 
to prepare herself for the profession in which her father had gained 
distinction. In consonance with this ambition she finally entered the 
Cleveland University of Medicine and Surgery, at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
in this institution she was graduated as a member of the class of 1894. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 35 

After thus receiving her degree of Doctor of Medicine she was engaged 
in practice at Willoughby, Ohio, until 1898, in which year she established 
her home in Fort Wayne. In this city she has impressed the intervening 
years with faithful service. The Doctor is a medical inspector of the 
public schools of Fort Wayne and also for the General Electric Company. 
She is a prominent member in the Indiana Federation of Women's Clubs, 
besides which she is identified with college sororities. In a professional 
way she is affiliated with the Indiana Institute of Homeopathy. Of the 
children of Dr. Banning the first, Lydia, died in infancy; Carina is the 
wife of William H. Warrington, of Fort Wayne, is a lawyer by profession 
and the first woman to be admitted to practice in Allen county. Florida 
is the wife of Charles Hart, of Fort Wayne ; and John D. is identified with 
the Doud real estate agency in this city. 

William N. Barden. — The life of William N. Barden, which came to 
a close on the 21st of April, 1913, was typical of the men who have entered 
heartily into the life of the community and made valuable contribution 
to the true social order. Mr. Barden was born in Genesee county, New 
York, October 22, 1846, a son of Nathaniel and Loretta (Brown) Barden. 
His father was a native of New Jersey and his mother of the state of New 
York, and of their four children, Mary, William N., and Loretta are de- 
ceised, the only one now living being Charles, who is a resident of Wood- 
land, Illinois. William N. Barden was only sixteen years of age when 
he contrived to compass his enlistment for service as a defender of the 
Union in the Civil war. He became a member of the Eighth New York 
Heavy Artillery, and in this gallant command he continued his faithful 
and valiant service for a period of three years. The regiment made a 
glorious record in the eastern campaigns of the great conflict between 
the North and the South, and took part in every engagement following 
the battle of Rappahannock with the army corps and division to which 
it was attached. After the close of his military career Mr. Barden, a 
gallant young veteran, came to the west and established his residence at 
Union City, Branch county, Michigan, where he engaged in the work of 
the carpenter's trade, his desires and ambitions being centered in identify- 
ing himself with the higher phases of construction work. Within a few 
months he was found in Chicago, engaged as a bridge builder. In 1871 
he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, as a 
constructor of bridges. Later he established himself in business at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, and while still a resident of that city he re-entered the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, in the service of which 
he became eventually locomotive engineer of passenger trains. He was 
one of the valued and veteran engineers in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company at the time of his death, and in his forty-three 
years of faithful and effective service he made a record that inures to 
his lasting credit and honor. On Christmas day of the year 1872 was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Barden to Miss Nettie Buell, who was 
born and reared in Branch county, Michigan, and who is a representative 
of one of the oldest, most numerous and most influential pioneer families 
of that county. She is a daughter of the late Chauncey and Elmira 
(Blanchard) Buell, both natives of the state of New York, the father 
having been born in Chenango county and the mother in Onondaga 
county. Chauncey Buell settled in the vicinity of Union City, Branch 
county, Michigan, as one of the pioneer farmers of that section of the 
state, and he had come to Michigan in 1838, the year following that of 



36 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

its admission as one of the sovereign commonwealths of the Union. He 
became one of the prominent and influential citizens of Branch county, 
and there both he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, both 
of them having been zealous members of the historic old Congregational 
church at Union City. Of their five children the eldest was William 
Henry, who became more familiarly known to his host of friends as 
"Billie Hank" Buell and who served with honor as a gallant soldier of 
the Union in the Civil War, in which he was a member of the Fourth 
Michigan Battery; he is now a resident of the National Soldiers' Home 
in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; Ira B. became one of the representa- 
tive farmers and substantial capitalists of Branch county, Michigan, 
and passed the closing years of his life in Union City, he likewise having 
been a soldier in the Civil war; Mrs. Barden was the next in order of 
birth ; Frances is deceased ; and Elnora is the wife of Phinious I. Simons, 
of Athens, Calhoun county, Michigan. William N. Barden was a stalwart 
supporter of the cause of the Republican party, received the thirty-second 
degree in the Scottish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, was an honored 
member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and was an active 
member of the Third Presbyterian church of Fort Wayne, as is also his 
widow, who takes deep interest in the various departments of church 
work, her pleasant home being at 206 West Creighton avenue. 

Edward A. Barnes, the general superintendent of the Fort Wayne 
works of the General Electric Company, has been a resident of this city 
for more than a quarter of a century and has been continuously identified 
with the electrical business during the entire period of his independent 
career. He is skilled in both the technical and practical knowledge of 
applied electricity and in his chosen profession has won distinctive suc- 
cess, as attested by the responsible position of which he is now the in- 
cumbent. In his personal career and ancestral history are points of more 
than passing interest, and in view of the present tragic period of "wars 
and rumors of war" he can not but feel a measure of satisfaction and 
pride in reverting to the long and able service given by his father as an 
officer in the British army. Edward A. Barnes can claim the distinction 
of Oriental birth, though he is a scion of the staunchest of British ancestry 
in both the agnatic and distaff lines. He was born at Dhurmsala, India, 
in June, 1865, and is a son of Major Edward Barnes and Georsriana 
(Carnegy) Barnes, the former a native of Wales and the latter of Scotland. 
Major Barnes gave distinguished service as an officer in the English 
army and was assigned to duty in different colonial dependencies of 
England from time to time, so that his travels were of wide scope. He 
was in government service with the army in India at the time of the birth 
of his son Edward A., of this review, and was in active service in South 
Africa at the time of his death, his widow having passed the closing years 
of her life in Fort Wayne, where she remained in the home of her son 
Edward A. until her death, in 1901. The only other surviving child is 
Colonel Arthur A. Barnes, who was commander of a Wiltshire regiment 
in England and who is now with his command in the great European 
war. Edward A. Barnes was a child of four years when he was taken 
from India to England, where he received excellent educational advan- 
tages and where he gained his preliminary technical training as an elec- 
trician. In 1885, when twenty years of age, he came to the United 
States and established his residence in Ncav York city. There he continued 
his association with the electrical business until 1889, when he came to 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 37 

Indiana and established his permanent home in Fort Wayne. Here he 
took a position with the Fort Wayne General Electric Company, and 
with this concern he has continued his effective services during the inter- 
vening years. The local works of the General Electric Company have 
owed much to Mr. Barnes for the effective development of the important 
business of which he is now the general superintendent, and thus he has 
been a factor in advancing the industrial and commercial prestige of 
Fort Wayne, where he is known and valued as a loyal citizen, progressive 
business man and as a captain of industry. In his estimate of the land 
of his adoption there is naught of equivocation and he is thoroughly in 
harmony with American sentiment and institutions. His political alleg- 
iance is given to the Republican party. He is a communicant of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, and he holds membership in the Fort Wayne 
Commercial Club, the Rotary Club, the General Electric Quarter Century 
Club, and the Country Club, as well as of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers and the American Institute of Metals. On October 
16, 1895, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Barnes to Miss Katherine 
Steinbrunner, who was born and reared in Fort Wayne and who is a 
daughter of Robert and Ignatia (Lais) Steinbrunner, both natives of 
Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes have two children — Georgiana Ignatia 
Carneay and Katherine Allison Stuart. 

Abraham G. Barnett is one of the most venerable of the native sons 
of Fort Wayne now residing in the city, and he has witnessed the develop- 
ment of the judicial center of Allen county from the status of a mere 
village to its present proud position as one of the important industrial 
and commercial centers and attractive cities of the Hoosier state. He is 
a representative of a family whose name has been identified with the 
history of Allen county during the long years that have intervened since 
the war of 1812, and his father was captain of a company that served at 
the old fort for some time during the progress of the second conflict with 
Great Britain. Mr. Barnett was born at Fort Wayne November 10, 1832, 
and is a son of James and Nancy (Welsh) Barnett, whose marriage was 
here solemnized in the year 1824. James Barnett came to Fort Wayne 
in 1812, and after having served as captain of a company that was here 
stationed during a portion of the war of 1812-15 he continued his residence 
in Fort Wayne after the war had terminated. In the pioneer days he 
developed a successful business in the hauling of merchandise and other 
commodities from Dayton, Ohio, to Fort Wayne, and finally he made 
judicious investments in land in this part of the state. He became one 
of the successful and influential citizens of Northern Indiana, did much 
to further civic and industrial development and progress in Allen county, 
and it was principally through his financial assistance and generosity that 
the late Samuel Hanna, another of the sterling pioneers of Allen county, 
was enabled to engage in the mercantile business and thus to lay the 
foundation of what became one of the large fortunes here accumulated. 
James Barnett was born in 1785 and died in 1851. His wife was born in 
1801 and died in 1857. Of their seven children, four attained to maturity, 
and of the number only two are now living — Abraham G., of this review, 
and Mrs. Susan B. Shoaff, who likewise resides in Fort Wayne. Abraham 
G. Barnett profited by the advantages afforded in the pioneer schools of 
Fort Wayne and at the age of about seventeen years he here began clerk- 
ing in the drug store of Watson Wall. In 1852, when twenty years old, 
he was one of the adventurous spirits who made the long and perilous 



38 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

journey across the plains to California, and four months were demanded 
in making the trip from St. Joseph, Missouri, the outfitting point, to 
Placerville, California, a place then known by the significant name of 
.Hangtown. Mr. Barnett was actively associated with gold mining in 
the pioneer placer camps of California, and his activities included also 
service as mail carrier and work as a blacksmith. In 1855 he returned 
to Fort Wayne, where he engaged in the grocery business, besides becom- 
ing a successful exponent of agricultural enterprise in his native county. 
Finally he was appointed United States assessor for the district compris- 
ing Allen county, and of this position he continued the incumbent three 
years. His next occupation was in connection with the operation of a 
local paper mill, and after severing this alliance he established in Fort 
"Wayne a transfer line. In this field of enterprise he built up a large 
and prosperous business and to the same he continued to give his general 
supervision for more than a quarter of a century. Since that time he 
has lived virtually retired in his attractive home at 2432 South Webster 
street, and he is one of the well known and highly honored pioneer citizens 
of Fort Wayne, At the time of the Civil war Mr. Barnett made two 
attempts to enlist, but on each occasion he was refused the privilege, 
owing to minor physical ailments. March 3, 1863, he was appointed major 
in the regular army, but never served. He is the oldest Blue Lodge Mason 
in Fort Wayne and has taken the York Rite degrees of Masonry and 
affiliated also with the Scottish Rite. He has always been liberal and 
public-spirited as a citizen, has maintained lively interest in all things 
touching the welfare and advancement of his native city and gives his 
political allegiance to the Republican party. As a young man Mr. Bar- 
nett wedded Miss Sarah Elizabeth Angell, who was born at Little Falls, 
New York, and the maximum loss and bereavement in his life came when 
his gracious and devoted wife was summoned to eternal rest, in 1906. 
Of the four children who survive the loved mother, Katherine is the wife 
of W. Bruce Beamer, of Fort Wayne ; Susan M. remains with her vener- 
able father; Byron H. is individually mentioned on other pages; and 
James W. is the name of the youngest. 

Eyron H. Barnett was formerly one of the successful exponents of 
amusement enterprise in his native city of Fort Wayne, where he was 
for a time associated in the ownership and operation of the Palace theater, 
a modern home that provides the best grade of entertainments. The 
business was effectively conducted by the Fort Wayne Lyric Theater 
Company, of which Mr. Barnett was secretary and treasurer. Byron H. 
Barnett was born in Fort Wayne, February 14, 1867, and is a son of 
Abraham G. Barnett, who conducted in this city a successful transfer 
business and who is a citizen held in unqualified esteem. Byron H. 
Barnett acquired his youthful' education in the Fort Wayne schools and 
as a young man served an apprenticeship to the machinist's trade, in the 
Fort Wayne shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. As a railroad 
man he was for five years employed on the Santa Fe in California, and 
at the expiration of this period he became associated with his father in 
the transfer business in Fort Wayne. Finally he here bcame associated 
with Frank E. Stouder in the ownership of the Lyric theater, and four 
years later, after having conducted the house most successfully, they 
disposed of the same and built the handsomely equipped Palace theater, 
which they conducted under the corporate title previously mentioned 
and with a substantial and representative supporting patronage. In 



; , uBUC UBRARYf 

t 

ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN FOUND ATtD«j 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 39 

politics Mr. Barnett is found arrayed as a loyal supporter of the principles 
and cause of the Republican party, he and his wife are communicants of 
the Protestant Episcopal church, he is affiliated with the local organiza- 
tion of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, and in the Masonic 
fraternity he holds membership in York Rite bodies, including the Fort 
Wayne Commandery of Knights Templars, besides which he is affiliated 
also with the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. In the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of Masonry 
he has received the thirty-second degree. In 1900 was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Barnett to Miss Catherine Auger, daughter of Louis B. 
Auger, a pioneer florist and well known citizen of Fort Wayne. Mr. and 
Mrs. Barnett have one son, Abraham Houston, who was born January 27, 
1903, and whose educational advantages include those of the Howe Mili- 
tary Academy, at Howe, Indiana. 

Charles Eldridge Barnett, M. D.— One of the functions of this publi- 
cation is to accord recognition to those who touch closely the communal 
life of Fort Wayne and Allen county, and under these conditions it is 
pleasing to give consideration to Dr. Barnett as one of the leading 
surgeons of the county and state. He is engaged in the practice of 
surgery in Fort Wayne and his success shows the expediency of concen- 
tration of effort in the one department of his profession. Dr. Barnett 
was born at Wapakoneta, the judicial center of Auglaize covmty, Ohio, 
September 30, 1866, and is a son of Rev. William C. and Frances Mead 
(Sullivan) Barnett, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of Virginia. The father, a man of fine intellectuality and exalted charac- 
ter, gave many years of effective service as a clergyman of the Lutheran 
church. For many years he was one of the directors of Wittenberg Col- 
lege, and he continued in the active work of the ministry until his death, 
which occurred in 1898, in the state of Tennessee, his loved wife having 
died in 1880, at which time the family home was in Kentucky ; and of their 
six children three are living. Dr. Charles Eldridge Barnett was a child of 
two years when his parents removed from Ohio to Boone county, Ken- 
tucky, where he was reared to the age of fifteen yars and where he 
attended the public schools. Thereafter he was engaged in teaching for 
a time and finally he entered Edgewood College at Edgewood, Tennesee, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1888, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. In preparation for his chosen profession 
he came to Indiana and entered the Fort Wayne College of Medicine, in 
which well ordered institution he was graduated in 1890, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. In 1893 he took an effective post-graduate course 
in the Chicago Polyclinic, and a few years later he did excellent post- 
graduate work in the medical department of the University of the South, 
at Suawanee, Tennessee. The Doctor has made Fort Wayne the scene 
of his professional activities since 1896 and he has been not only a leader 
in surgery but has also been influential in the educational work of his 
profession. He served as a member of the faculty of his alma mater, the 
Fort Wayne College of Medicine, in which he held the chair of surgical 
anatomy and genito-urinary surgery until the institution, together with 
all other medical colleges in the state, was merged into the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Indiana, in which he was made adjunct pro- 
fessor of genito-urinary surgery. The professional novitiate of Dr. Bar- 
nett was served at Archer, Nebraska. He is actively identified with the 
American Medical Association; the Mississippi Valley Medical Assoeia- 



40 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

tion, of which he was vice-president in 1911, as well as chairman of its 
surgical section ; the Indiana State Medical Society ; and the Allen County 
Medical Society, of which he was president during the year 1910-1911. 
He took a lively interest in the alumni association of Fort Wayne College 
of Medicine and served at one time as president of the same. The Doctor 
is a member of the Indiana state committee for the national association 
of physicians formed for the furtherance of medical preparedness under 
conditions of war; and of the Council of National Defense under the 
jurisdiction of the War Department ; is a member of the medical officers 
reserve corps of the United States Army ; and is an influential member of 
the American Society of Urological Surgeons. He is a fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons. In 1898 he gave definite evidence of his 
loyalty and patriotism by tendering his service and going forth as assis- 
tant surgeon of the One Hundred and Fifty-Seventh Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, with the rank of captain. Incidental to the Spanish-American 
war he continued in active and effective service with this command until 
the regiment was mustered out, at the close of activities. Dr. Barnett 
has been a voluminous and an authoritative writer on professional sub- 
jects pertaining to the diagnoses and treatment of genito-urinary dis- 
eases, especially from the surgical standpoint. After returning from 
one of his numerous trips to Europe for post-graduate work he gave to 
the world some new and valuable surgical knowledge by publishing, in 
1910, an article entitled, "The Visicule Seminales," which was copied 
by the leading foreign surgical journals. In 1913 he published an article 
entitled "Polycistic Kidney," and, as a matter of purely technical judg- 
ment on his part, he looks upon these two publications as constituting 
his most valuable contributions to the literature of his profession. He is 
one of the Abstract Editors of the Literature of the world under the 
subject of Genito-Urinary Surgery, also on the advisory board and 
Colaborator of the Urologic and Cutaneous Review. He is one of the 
Abstract Editors of Genito-Urinary Surgery in International Abstract of 
Surgery (Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics with International Abstract 
of Surgery). In connection with his study and individual research he 
continues to make frequent contributions to our leading surgical publica- 
tions, with his ideals of personal stewardship in thus giving to his con- 
freres the benefits of his fortuitous knowledge. Dr. Barnett has taken 
post-graduate work in all of the leading surgical centers of Europe, 
especially Vienna, Austria, and he has traveled in nearly all parts of the 
civilized world, with a constant view to expanding his knowledge of 
surgical science and practice. In politics he gives unswerving allegiance 
to the Democratic party, and in the Masonic fraternity he has completed 
the circle of both the York and Scottish Rites and belongs to the Mystic 
Shrine. 

James M. Barrett, long connected with the traction systems of 
northern Indiana in executive positions, has enjoyed for many years 
an enviable place among the members of the bar of Indiana. For an 
extended period Mr. Barrett served as the counsel for the several com- 
panies that developed into the present Fort Wayne & Northern Indiana 
Traction Company, and latterly, until 1917, he served as president of this 
important corporation, which not only owns and operates the Fort Wayne 
city traction system and a seven-mile extension to Robison Park but also 
owns and operates two important interurban lines, extending to the south 
and southwest of Fort Wayne. As an authority on corporation law Mr. 



FORT AVAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY . 41 

Barrett has gained a high reputation, although his services in other lines 
have proved to be most efficacious. As the author of the so-called Barrett 
law, while a member of the Indiana legislature, his name is favorably 
known throughout the state. James Madison Barrett was born on a farm 
in LaSalle county, Illinois, February 7, 1852, and is a son of Benjamin 
and Elizabeth Barrett, both natives of Ireland, where the father was born 
in the year 1809, a son of William Barrett. James M. Barrett was the 
eighth in order of birth in a family of eleven children, of whom nine 
attained to years of maturity. Benjamin Barrett and his wife came from 
the Emerald Isle to America in 1834. They established their home in 
Belmont county, Ohio, where the father continued to be engaged in 
farming until 1848, when removal was made to LaSalle county, Illinois. 
There the death of Benjamin Barrett occurred in 1876, his widow surviv- 
ing him by nearly a score of years and having been eighty years of age 
at the time of her death, in January, 1894.- After attending the common 
schools of his native county, James M. Barrett was given the opportunity 
of attending the Mendota College, at Mendota, Illinois, and after leaving 
this institution he entered the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1875. He had 
pursued a literary course in the university, thus following a natural 
inclination to acquaint himself with the broad scope of this branch of 
work undertaken so thoroughly by the Ann Arbor institution. Mr. Bar- 
rett's university course was followed by a brief course of study in the 
law offices of the firm of McCagg, Culver & Butler, prominent Chicago 
attorneys, and thereafter he spent a period of study at Princeton, Illinois. 
He was attracted to Fort Wayne in the early weeks of 1876 and reached 
the city on Washington's birthday anniversary of that year. Shortly 
after his arrival he was admitted to the bar of Allen county. Mr. Barrett 
found it advisable to devote his studies largely to the intricacies of 
corporation law, and his determined action along this line has brought 
him a designation as a man of keen perception, yet one with a knowledge 
and appreciation of the rights of men that have won for him the victory 
in many a hard-fought legal battle. For a considerable period Mr. 
Barrett was associated in practice with Samuel L. Morris and R. C. Bell, 
and after the death of the latter the firm of Barrett & Morris continued 
until the recent addition of Edward G. Hoffman to the personnel of the 
firm. An extensive suite in the Shoaff building marks the location of this 
important legal union. For several years before his selection as president 
of the Fort Wayne & Northern Indiana Traction Company Mr. Barrett 
served as the counsel for the company. His knowledge of this branch of 
commercial activity has made his service and advice of incalculable value 
to other traction systems in which he holds a financial interest. Mr. 
Barrett is interested in a number of manufacturing industries, including 
the Packard Company, makers of the famed Packard pianos and player- 
pianos, and he is a member of the directorate of this concern. In 1896 
Mr. Barrett was appointed a member of the board of trustees of Purdue 
University, at Lafayette, Indiana, by Governor Claude Matthews. He 
served on the board with former President Benjamin Harrison, who was 
selected the same year. In 1886 he became the Democratic candidate for 
state senator, to represent the P^'ort Wayne district, and his popularity 
was demonstrated by the splendid majority that was awarded him at the 
polls. During his first term in the senate he was prominently identified 
with the creation of many constructive laws. Among the important acts 



42 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

was that which insured for Fort AVayne the choice of his home city as the 
seat of the Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth. During the im- 
portant session of 1889 Mr. Barrett was the acknowledged leader of his 
party in the senate, serving as chairman of the judiciary commJttee and 
as a member of many other committees whose functions Avere of marked 
importance to the success of momentous measures of that session. Senator 
Barrett was the author of a number of important bills, and proved to be 
an able and discriminating legislator. Faithful to the interests of the 
people, he was uniformly recognized as an impartial representative of 
his district and of the state. Mr. Barrett has achieved a reputation not 
only as a ready, forceful and eloquent speaker but he has also shown 
himself to be possessed of great strength of character and thus has ever 
held an inviolable place in the hearts of the people of his community. 
Mr. Barrett is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Benevo- 
lent & Protective Order of Elks. He finds delight in his affiliation with 
the Fort Wayne Country Club, and his active interest in civic affairs is 
suggested by his membership in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club. The 
recognition of his personal worth is indicated in his membership in the 
American Academy of Social Science, the American Geographical Society, 
the American Municipal League, the American Bar Association and the 
Indiana Bar Association. On the 28th of June, ]877, Mr. Barrett was 
united in marriage with Miss Marian A. Bond, daughter of Charles D. and 
Lavinia (Ewing) Bond, of Fort Wayne. Mr. Bond was a former president 
of the Fort Wayne National Bank, which is now known as the Old 
National Bank, and his wife was a daughter of Judge Charles W. Ewing, 
the first attorney to locate in Fort Wayne and one of the earliest judges 
of the circuit court of Allen county. To James M. Barrett and his wife 
have been born four children : Florence Ewing, wife of George T. Ladd, 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Charles W., master mechanic of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad shops at Sunbury, Pennsylvania ; Walter A., me- 
chanical engineer with the Bass Foundry & Machine Company, Fort 
Wayne; and James Madison, Jr., now (1917) a student in the University 
of Michigan, in the literary department of which institution he was 
graduated in 1916 and in the law department of which he is a member 
of the class of 1918. James M. Barrett has always been a liberal con- 
tributor to every movement for the advancement of Fort Wayne and the 
state of Indiana, and he is truly counted as one of Indiana's "most valuable 
citizens. 

Louis L. Bart, one of the prominent real estate men of Fort Wayne, 
Indiana, was born in Mallet Creek, Ohio, a village in Medina county, 
that state, October 28, 1875. He is of German extraction, his father, 
Leonard Bart, having been born in Germany, March 31, 1832. He 
learned the shoemaker trade and conducted a shoe store in Washington, 
D. C, after his arrival in this country. He espoused the cause of the 
north in the War of the Rebellion, serving at the battle of Bull Run 
and others. Later he married Helen Miller, a native of Newark, Licking 
county, Ohio, and taking his bride to Mallet Creek, established himself 
in the shoe trade. He conducted a shoe store for thirty-two years, 
retired, and is still living in the town of his adoption. To him and 
his wife were born six children, five of whom are living. Louis L. 
Bart, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the common schools 
at Mallet Creek, Ohio, and in the high school at York, Ohio, from which 
institution he was graduated with the class of 1891. Immediately upon 



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FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 43 

receiving his diploma he interested himself in the profession of teleg- 
raphy and followed it for twenty-two years. For fifteen years he was 
associated with the Nickel Plate Railroad at Fort Wayne, thirteen of 
which he was train dispatcher. He forsook this calling, however, to 
take up that of the real estate business, establishing himself in business 
in 1913. He has met with success in this new pursuit and is now the 
vice-president of the Wildwood Sales Company. But this on? o^^ce 
does not require all his time and he is also a director in the Morris 
Plan Bank, vice-president of the Fort Wayne Real Estate Exchanc^e, 
and is on the executive committee of the Railroaders' Realty Company. 
Mr. Bart has always given the Republican party his political support, 
although he has never entered the lists as a candidate for office. He 
is a Knight Templar, a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, and 
also a member of the Shrine. He is a member of the Commercial C^ub, 
serving that organization on the membership committee. On June 29, 
1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bart to Miss Josephine Shue- 
maker, and this marriage has been blessed with one son, Robert Rosen- 
thal Drayer Bart. 

Charles S. Bash. — Measured by its rectitude, its productiveness, its 
pervading altruism and its material success, the life of the late Charles S. 
Bash, of Fort Wayne, counted for much, and in this history of the city 
and county in which he passed the major part of his life and to whose 
civic and material progress he contributed in large measure, it is most 
consistent that a review of his career and a tribute to his memory be 
incorporated. His influence extended in many directions, his broad 
business activities inured to the commercial prestige of Fort Wayne, and 
his insistent civic loyalty and progressiveness were not a matter of mere 
sentiment but of constructive achievement. He marked by distinctive 
personal accomplishment a place of his own in connection with economic, 
industrial and social affairs of Allen county, where his name and memory 
shall he held in lasting honor. Mr. Bash was born at Roanoke, Hunting- 
ton county, Indiana, July 28, 1853, and at his home in Fort Wayne, he 
rested from his labors and passed to the life eternal on the 24th of Septem- 
ber, 1916, after an illness of several months' duration. Of his attitude 
in the closing days of his earnest and prolific life the following pertinent 
statement has been written: ''His indomitable courage and his deter- 
mined refusal to submit to the domination of physical ills were such that 
until two weeks prior to his death his condition was not thought to be 
serious." In the year following that of his birth the parents of Mr. Bash 
removed to Fort Wayne, and here he passed the residue of his life. Here 
he continued his studies in the public schools until he had duly profited 
by the advantages of the high school, and soon afterward he became 
associated with the firm of S. Bash & Company, which was well established 
in the seed and produce commission business and of which his father, Solo- 
mon Bash, was the executive head. This firm was founded in 1868, the in- 
terested principals in establishing the business being Solomon Bash, P. D. 
Smyser, and P. L. McKee. Solomon Bash was long known and honored 
as one of the representative business men and influential citizens of Fort 
Wayne and he became president of the commission house of S. Bash & 
Company after the same was incorporated under the laws of Indiana. 
Of this office he continued the incumbent until his death, which occurred 
in 1914. His son, Charles S., subject of this memoir, then assumed control 
of the extensive and well ordered commission business, of which he 



44 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

became the sole owner, the other members of the company having retired. 
His intimate and prolonged association with the business thus established 
in the early days gave to him the strongest of reinforcement in carrying 
forward the important industrial and commercial enterprise, and in this 
connection the following estimate is worthy of perpetuation: "Having 
entered the employ of his father when a young man, he had practically 
grown up with the business, and his knowledge in this line was so broad 
and accurate that he was justly considered an authority and that his 
advice was often solicited and as frequently valued. Few men had a 
wider or more general acquaintanceship throughout northern Indiana 
than did Mr. Bash, the nature of his business bringing him into specially 
close touch with the representative agriculturists in this favored portion 
of the Hoosier state. ' ' A man of splendid force and much reserve energy, 
Mr. Bash did not limit his activities to the seed and produce business, 
and his interests became many and varied in connection with commercial, 
industrial and semi-public enterprises, the while he was known as one of 
Fort Wayne's most alert, progressive and loj^al citizens. Mr. Bash was 
one of the organizers and incorporators of the Salamoni Mining & Gas 
Company, and this became one of the most important concerns with 
which he had constructive alliance. It was essentially due to the zealous 
and well ordered efforts of Mr. Bash that natural gas was first brought 
into Fort Wayne, and it was in his home that the first natural gas piped 
into the city was burned. In that pioneer period -pf the development of 
the natural gas industry in northern Indiana; In. 1890, the introduction 
of the gas in Fort Wayne was an event of importance, and many persons 
assembled to witness the result of the experiment when Mr, Bash lighted 
the first flame. He had the circumspection and initiative that make for 
self-confidence, and he was ever ready to support his confidence in con- 
crete action, so that it was characteristic of the man when he became the 
prime mover in the organization of the natural gas company and the subse- 
quent exploitation and development of the gas resources of this part of 
the state. In this field w^as given one evidence of his progressiveness and 
ready grasping of opportunity, and it is a matter of record that later 
appreciable financial returns came from the development of the natural 
gas business throughout the eastern and central parts of Indiana. Mr. 
Bash was one of the organizers and original stockholders of the Home 
Telephone & Telegraph Corapanj^, and was characteristically resourceful 
and influential in the upbuilding of its excellent system of service. He 
was likewise one of the incorporators of the Wayne Knitting Mills and 
gave to the incipient enterprise the valuable aid that resulted in its devel- 
opment from modest proportions to an important status as one of the 
leading concerns of its kind in the United States. Mr. Bash established 
the first fertilizing plant in this section of Indiana, and was for some time 
a director of the Hamilton National Bank and of the Fort Wayne Electric 
Works. His judgment was always assured in connection with business 
affairs and he was always ready to back this judgment by financial co- 
operation and personal effort in the support of enterprises that tended 
to advance the general welfare. There were few public enterprises in 
Fort Wayne in which he did not figure prominently and effectively. 
Concerning one of the most important undertakings that received his 
earnest and thoughtful advocacy the following statements have been 
made: "Just as he caught the vision of what the gas and telephone in- 
dustries might mean to the commonwealth, so he felt and realized the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 45 

possibilities and value of a barge canal through Fort Wayne. He was 
one of the pioneer boosters and hardest workers for the so-called Toledo, 
Fort Wayne & Chicago canal. For years he was a member of the board 
of directors of the Erie & Michigan Deep Waterways Association, and in 
December, 1915, he was an influential delegate to the national rivers and 
harbors congress. In the furtherance of the construction of the oanal 
he made a number of promotive trips with the late Hon, Perry A. Randall 
and delivered forceful speeches in favor of the project. It was one of his 
fondest hopes that he might see Lake Erie and Lake Michigan connected 
with Fort Wayne by a barge canal. He was confident of the ultimate 
construction of such a waterway. Having been for many years engaged 
in the shipping business, he could fully gauge the benefits to be derived 
from such transportation facilities, and he gave unsparingly of his time 
and money in forwarding the movement. " As a broad-minded and public- 
spirited citizen, Mr. Bash was strongly fortified in his convictions concern- 
ing governmental and economic matters and was aligned as a stalwart 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party. His civic loyalty was 
clearly shown by the effective service he gave as a member of the munici- 
pal board of public works, during the administration of Mayor Oakley, 
and by his several years' membership on the board of education. His 
deep interest in the cause of the Republican party became specially notice- 
able during the national campaigns of 1896 and 1900, when he became 
associated with Dr. A. E. Bulson, Jr., E. F. Yarnelle, and A. T. Lukens, 
in forming the "Big Four Quartet," an organization that traveled exten- 
sively through this section of the country during each of these campaigns 
and sang stirring songs in the Republican meetings held to further the 
cause of President McKinley and that of the party in general. Mr. Bash 
was a zealous member and supporter of Westminster Presbyterian church, 
in which his widow retains active membership, and such were his charac- 
ter and services that he signally honored the city in which he spent 
virtually his entire life and in which the community manifested a sense 
of personal loss and sorrow when he was summoned from the stage of his 
mortal endeavors. In April, 1882, was solmenized the marriage of Mr. 
Bash to Miss Flora E. Orr, who survives him, as do also nine children — 
Charles S., Jr., Joseph W. and Howard 0., all of whom are identified with 
business affairs in Fort Wayne ; Hester, who is the wife of Miles F. 
Porter, Jr., of this city; Virginia, who is the wiie of Hale Bradley, of 
Huntington, Indiana ; Clara, who is the wife of Arthur Schreck, of Fort 
Wayne ; and Misses Lucy, Julia and Marian, who remain with their 
widowed mother in the beautiful family home in Fort Wayne. 

John H. Bass — The name of John H. Bass is inseparably connected, 
in a most enviable way, with the financial and industrial life of Fort 
Wayne and the middle west during a period of more than sixty years. 
The activities of Mr. Bass in his home city date from the year 1852 when, 
at the age of seventeen, he inaugurated that vigorous, intelligent business 
career which has raised him to the pinnacle of success and placed his 
name among the captains of industry. Fort Wayne takes just pride in 
Mr. Bass as one of her foremost, substantial, progressive citizens. The 
monster plant of the Bass Foundry & Machine Company, spreading its 
departments over an area of more than five city squares in length will 
ever stand as a monument to his genius and ability— for Mr. Bass, unlike 
many another man similarly situated, has been careful to keep his hands 
and his mind closely upon the developing business which has grown to 



46 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

such large proportions and has refrained from delegating the care of 
his larger affairs to others. The Bass Foundry & Machine Company had 
its inception in 1853, when it was organized as Jones, Bass & Company. 
John H. Bass came to Fort Wayne in the preceding year from Salem, 
Livingston county, Kentucky, where he was born, November 9, 1835. 
Mr. Bass is descended from early families of Virginia and the Carolinas 
prominently identified with the colonial history of the nation. The 
grandfather of John H. Bass on the side of the father was Jordan Bass, 
born in Virginia in 1764, from which state he moved to Christian county, 
Kentucky, in 1805, in the midst of the troublous conditions which pre- 
ceded the war of 1812, in which Kentucky and Indiana took such a 
prominent part. He died in 1853 at the age of eighty-nine years. Sion 
Bass, father of John H. Bass, was born in Virginia, November 7, 1802. 
From the age of three, he was a resident of Kentucky and rose to prom- 
inence in the conduct of commercial affairs and the owner and cultivator 
of large areas of farm land. The wife of Sion Bass was Miss Jane Todd, 
born in Charleston, South Carolina, June 19, 1802, the daughter of John 
Todd, also a pioneer settler of Kentucky. Sion Bass and wife remained 
in Kentucky until 1866, when they came to Fort Wayne and spent their 
closing days with their son, John H. Bass. The mother died August 26, 
1874, and the father August 7, 1888. They were the parents of six 
children, four of whom attained to maturity. John H. Bass is the only 
surviving member of the family. In this connection it would seem en- 
tirely proper to refer briefly to the services and military record of Colonel 
Sion S. Bass, elder brother of John H. Bass, whose name is held in tender 
remembrance by the veterans of the Civil war and who have named one 
of the local posts of the Grand Array of the Republic in his honor. Sion 
S. Bass, who was born in Kentucky in January, 1827, came to Fort 
Wayne in 1848, as the first representative of the family to settle in In- 
diana. To his honor it may be said that he represented the type of 
pioneer manufacturer who laid the foundation for much of the active 
development in many lines of endeavor. As a member of the firm of 
Jones, Bass & Company, which was succeeded by the Fort Wayne 
Machine Works, he became indirectly one of the founders of the Bass 
Foundry & Machine Works, which was sold to the Pennsylvania railway 
for shop purposes and other industries which have resulted from the 
parent institution. Lincoln's call for volunteers in 1861 appealed to him 
so strongly that he gave up, with temporary intent, the conduct of his 
affairs in order to give his services to his country. His first service was 
in giving assistance to the formation of the famous Thirtieth Indiana 
volunteers of which he was made colonel. This regiment took an active 
part in the maneuvers which led up to the battle of Shiloh. Early on 
the second day of that battle, the regiment, without time to rest from an 
arduous march to the field, was ordered to advance. Amid a deadly 
fire, the regiment pushed forward, led by Colonel Bass, who fell with a 
mortal wound. Many others fell in that fearful advance at Shiloh. The 
comrades of Colonel Bass, after a brief memorial service, sent the body 
back to Fort Wayne, where a city already in mourning for many others 
M^ho sacrificed their lives in that immortal battle, bowed in deeper grief 
over tbe fallen leader of the,gallant Thirtieth. John H, Bass attendea 
the schools of his native county in Kentucky, and there gave evidence 
of a strong adaptability for the lines of study which later developed in 
the modern type of business man. For a time he enjoyed the instruction 
of a private tutor. He was seventeen years of age when hp came to Fort 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 47 

Wayne, in 1852, to begin his actual commercial career. For a time he 
was employed in a grocery store, and then served as a bookkeeper for the 
contracting firm of Samuel and William S. Edsall. Then he joined his 
brother, Sion S. Bass, as an employe of Jones, Bass & Company, where he 
served as bookkeeper from 1854 until 1857, when the firm dissolved 
partnership. During these years, Mr. Bass had, by studying at night, 
perfected himself as an accountant. In 1857, when investments in Iowa 
lands proved an attractive venture, he went west and spent $3,700 in 
the choicest farm lands he could find. He remained two years, watching 
carefully the real estate conditions, and returned with $15,000 in cash 
and the deeds to real estate worth $50,000. The close application to the 
study of business methods fitted him, by the year 1859, to employ his 
capital, in company with that of Edward L. Force, in the establishment 
of Bass & Force. The aggregate output of the concern during the first 
t"welve months reached $20,000. This plant stood on the site of the 
present Pennsylvania railway shops and became the nucleus of this great 
industrial department of that system. The example of Mr. Bass in ven- 
turing the investment of his money in manufacturing enterprises at that 
time was a great incentive to others to do likewise, with the result that 
Fort Wayne early became famed as a manufacturing center. Between 
the years 1860 and 1863 the business was owned and conducted by Mr. 
Bass and Judge Samuel Hanna. In 1863 Judge Hanna transferred his 
interests to his son, Horace Hanna, whose death occurred six years later. 
At that time Mr. Bass purchased the stock held by the Hannas and has 
since been the sole owner of the business and, under his sole management, 
it has had a wonderful prosperity. Employment has been given to thou- 
sands down through the years, and many of Fort Wayne's substantial 
citizens have been drawn and held there through their connection with 
the Bass Foundry & Machine Works. In 1898 the company -was in- 
corporated with a capital of $1,500,000, which was later increased to 
$2,200,000. This corporation owns and operates a branch plant at Rock 
Run, Alabama, which mines and smelts a large part of the ore used in 
the products of the Fort Wayne plant. The fine grade of pig iron which 
is made into car wheels comes largely from the affiliated Alabama con- 
cern. From time to time larger and better buildings have been added to 
the Fort Wayne plant. An average of 2,500 men are employed here, with 
an annual payroll (1917) of $1,500,000. The tonnage of manufactured 
material shipped from the two plants aggregates 300,000 tons annually. ^ 
The chief products of the Fort Wayne plant are car wheels, axles, iron 
and steel forgings, Corliss engines, boilers, complete power plants and 
gray iron castings. The product of the Rock Run plant is high grade 
furnace pig iron. The Fort Wayne plant covers an area of twenty acres. 
Twenty-five thousand acres of land are included in the Rock Run mining 
district owned by the company. Raw material from which the Fort 
Vf ayne plant produces its finished products is shipped to the city by the 
train load. The many departments of the business are operated "like 
clockwork" and the products of the Bass establishments have made a 
reputation for themselves and Foft Wayne all over America. After Mr. 
Bass established the Fort Wayne plant on a prosperous basis, he gave 
a portion of his attention to other lines of indu.^try which indicate his 
ability in many directions. In 1869 he founded the St. Louis Car Wheel 
Company, at St. Louis, Missouri, in which he held a controlling interest 
and served as its president until he disposed of his interest in the com- 
pany. In 1873 Mr, Bass, despite the conditions which characterized the 



48 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

panic of the period, established an extensive iron works in the city of 
Chicago, a venture which suggests the qualities in the character of Mr. 
Bass which enables him to view the future and its possibilities with a 
keener understanding than that which is vouchsafed to mo«t men of 
large affairs. Without that degree of daring which characterizes the 
plunger, but with a marked foresight and sagacity, coupled with good 
judgment, he recognized the possibilities of the city of Chicago and "got 
in on the ground floor" just as that city was beginning to recover from 
the effects of the destructive fire of two years before. The Chicago 
venture like that in St. Louis proved to be a large paying investment. 
In addition to the Alabama mining properties, and those already de- 
scribed, Mr. Bass is heavily interested in a large foundry at Lenoir, 
Tennessee, Avhich is also supplied with raw material from the Alabama 
mines. During his many years of residence in Fort Wayne Mr. Bass has 
shown a broad public spirit. He was one of the owners of the original 
street railway system, when the horse-drawn cars were employed. The 
Citizens' Street Railway Company was incorporated in 1871, to operate 
the system. On the 22nd of August, 1887, on the foreclosure of a 
mortgage for $20,000 executed to Oliver P. Morgan and Ed^v^ard P. 
Williams, the property rights and franchises were sold to Mr. Bass and 
Stephen B. Bond, representing the Fort Wayne Street Railway Company, 
which was brought into existence to acquire the property. The system 
then consisted of about two miles of single track on Calhoun street, from 
Main street to Creighton avenue, on Creighton avenue from Calhoun 
street to Fairfield avenue, and on Wallace street from Calhoun to Hanna 
streets. The cars were operated at intervals of twenty minutes. Asso- 
ciated with Mr. Bass and Mr. Bond in this ownership were Jesse L. 
Williams and Charles D. Bond. These men were the owners of large 
tracts of land south of the Pennsylvania tracks and east of Calhoun 
street, and the extension of the line served in the early development of 
that outlying district. This company owned the street railway lines 
until August, 1892, when a reorganized company converted the property 
into an electrically-propelled system. For many years Mr, Bass has 
been one of the chief stockholders of the First National Bank of Fort 
Wayne. During thirty years he held the office of president and resigned 
January 9, 1917. He is also a member of the boards of directors of the 
Old National Bank and of the Hamilton National Bank. The latter was 
merged with the First National Bank on April 7, 1917, and the institution 
is now known as the First and Hamilton National Bank. The beautiful 
suburban home of ]Mr. Bass — known as Brookside — is the most widely 
known estate in this region. In the midst of a large park of three hun- 
dred acres with broad areas of artificial lake, the mansion has a most 
beautiful setting. Here, Mr. Bass maintains a deer and buffalo park, and 
conducts a large dairy and stock farm. To the breeding of Clydesdale 
horses and Galloway cattle Mr. Bass has devoted much attention during 
the past quarter century. Direct importations are made from Europe. 
Upon this farm are to be found some of the finest specimens of live stock 
in the world. Exhibits at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, in 1893, 
and at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, in 1904, are note- 
worthy as receiving many first prizes. In various portions of Allen 
county, Mr. Bass owns fifteen thousand acres of land, while his land 
holdings in other parts of Indiana and in other states are extensive. He 
owns eighteen thousand acres of mineral land in Alabama. In the city 
of Fort Wayne he possesses a large number of commercial and residential 



If llillliijlif III III lltl II IH " 







TIUOE^ 



i VvUN' 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 49 

properties. So wide are his investment interests that these suggestions 
must suffice to indicate their aggregate valuation which may be esti- 
mated at between five and six millions of dollars. Mr. Bass has ever 
given his support to the principles of the Democratic party. In 1888 he 
was chosen as a delegate from Indiana to the national convention of his 
party and was nominated as presidential elector in that year. Mr. Bass 
is prominent in Masonic affairs of Indiana; he has been honored with 
the 1 hirty-Third degree of the Scottish Eite. He is a member of the 
First Presbyterian church. lu 1865 Mr, Bass was united in marriage 
with Miss Laura H. Lightfoot, daughter of the late Judge George C. and 
Melinda (Holton) Lightfoot. Mrs. Bass was born in Falmouth, Ken- 
tucky, and resided there with her parents at the time of the marriage. 
Two children have been born to them, Laura Grace, wife of Dr. Gaylord 
M. Leslie, of Fort Wayne, and John H., -whose death occurred August 7, 
1891. This brief review of the active life of Mr. Bass suggests nothing 
of the geniality of the man which has not only surrounded him with the 
warmest of friends but which has enabled him to establish such a re- 
lationship between the executive and the productive departments of his 
large enterprises as to preserve the highest degree of harmony and con- 
sequent efficiency. To him Fort Wayne owes much of the inspiration 
which has lifted her to a high place among the cities of the middle west. 
Conrad Bayer, one of the specially alert and progressive business 
men of Fort Wayne, has been a resident of this city from his early youth 
and by his own ability and efforts has risen to a status of prominence and 
influence in connection with the representative commercial activities of 
the Summit City. His popularity is unqualified and is indicated in his 
being more familiarly knoM^n as "Coony" Bayer, this pseudonym being 
utilized in connection with the large and important industrial enterprise 
which has been developed under his able direction, for he is president 
and treasurer of the Coony Bayer Cigar Company, which owns and con- 
ducts one of the largest cigar manufactories in northern Indiana. This 
extensive enterprise was founded by him in 1891, and operations were 
instituted upon a very modest scale, as in this original manufactory he 
gave employment to but one man, the while he himself vigorously worked 
also at his trade, after having served a thorough apprenticeship as a 
cigarmaker. Not only effective service and excellent products were 
necessary to effect the evolution of the extensive business now controlled 
by the company of which he is executive head, but also the energy, cir- 
cumspection and initiative and constructive ability which he was able to 
bring to bear. He continued business in an individual way until about 
1902, when, to meet the constantly increasing demands placed upon his 
establishment, he effected the organization and incorporation of the 
present stock company, of which he has been president and treasurer 
from the beginning, William A. Bayer being superintendent and gen- 
eral manager, and Frederick Bayer the secretary of the company, which 
was originally incorporated for fifteen thousand dollars. No more 
pertinent voucher for the splendid expansion of the enterprise can be 
found than in the fact that in 1914 the capital stock was increased to one 
hundred thousand dollars, the executive officers remaining the same. In 
connection with the business and manufacturing departments of this now 
large industrial and commercial enterprise an average of about seventy- 
five persons are employed. In 1901 the factory headquarters were 
established in a building erected for the purpose, at the corner of Wayne 
aiid Barr streets, but within a comparatively few years these accommo- 



50 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

dations proved inadequate, with the result that in 1915 the company 
erected its present modern building of five stories, at the corner of Cal- 
houn and Levs^is streets, the same affording the aggregate floor space of 
seventeen thousand square feet. The high grade of the products of this 
manufactory constitutes its best commercial asset, and the annual out- 
put of cigars is now in excess of four million, while the trade is con- 
stantly being expanded into a broader field. Conrad (Coony) Bayer 
was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, on the 27th of 
November, 1871, and thus he was a lad of about ten years when, in 1881, 
he accompanied his parents, Michael and Dorothea (Stuber) Bayer, on 
their immigration to America, the family home having soon afterward 
been established in Fort Wayne, where he was reared to adult age and 
where he continued to attend the Lutheran parochial schools until he 
was eligible for entrance in a local business college, in which he com- 
pleted an effective course. In the establishment of Dessauer & Company 
he learned the trade of cigarmaker, and later he was in the employ of 
W. H. Ortman, engaged in the same line of business. In 1891 he severed 
this alliance to establish his independent enterprise as a manufacturer 
of cigars, and from a small beginning he has evolved one of the large 
and prosperous manufacturing and commercial industries of the metrop- 
olis of Allen county, besides h?ving shown his progressiveness and self- 
reliant energy in connection with other lines of enterprise. He is 
president of the Bayer Realty Company, and is a member of the 
directorate of the German-American Bank of Fort Wayne. In politics 
Mr. Bayer accords staunch allegiance to the Democratic party, he is a 
valued member of each the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, Rotary Club 
and Retail INIerchants' Association, and is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Order of Buffaloes, 
and the Turnverein. On September 30, 1901, Mr. Bayer wedded Miss 
Anna Hofer, daughter of Andreas and Christine Hofer, of Fort Wayne, 
and the two children of this union are Ralph Conrad, who was born July 
12, 1904, and Dorothy Christine, born November 21, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary J. Beardsley — It is specially gratifying to present in this 
history a brief review of the life record of this venerable and revered 
native daughter of Allen county, who is a representative of one of the 
best known and most honored pioneer families of the county, her par- 
ents having here established their home more than four score years ago. 
Mrs. Beardsley celebrated in November, 1916, the eighty-third anniversary 
of her birth, and as she has lived in Allen county all her life it may well 
be understood that her memory forms an indissoluble link between the 
pioneer past and the twentieth century of opulent prosperity and 
progress in this section of the Hoosier state. Mrs. Mary Jane (Wood) 
Beardsley has the distinction of having been the first white child born in 
Perry township, this county, and the time of her nativity was November, 
1833. She is a daughter of Albert and Nancy (Dunton) Wood, both of 
whom were born and reared in Jefferson county, New York, where their 
marriage was solemnized and whence they soon afterward, in 1833, came 
to Indiana and numbered themselves among the very first settlers in the 
wilds of what is now Perry township, Allen county, where the father 
set to himself the herculean task of reclaiming a farm from the forest. Of 
the twelve children Mrs. Beardsley was the first-born, and in the year 
that marked the establishing of the new home in Allen county she here 
gained the prestige of being the first white child born in Perry town- 



FORT WAYNP] AND ALLEN COUNTY 51 

ship, as previously noted. Of the other eleven children, all likewise 
natives of this county, one died in infancy, and the names of the others 
are here indicated in their respective order of birth : John Wesley, 
Richard Freeman, Amos Mason, Oscar B., Julia, Etta, Lucy, Commodore, 
William and Charles. Besides Mrs. Beardsley only four others of the 
children are living at the opening of the year 1917 — Richard F., who is 
now a resident of the state of Kansas, where he has been for many years 
a prosperous farmer ; Oscar B., who resides at Monroe, Grant county, In- 
diana ; Lucy, who is the wife of Henry McCarthy, of Columbia City, 
Whitley county, Indiana ; and William, who owns and resides upon his 
father's old homestead farm in Perry township, one mile west of Hunter- 
town. William Wood is one of the extensive landholders of Allen county 
and is one of the substantial and representative citizens of his native 
township. He has five sons, two of whom are successful teachers in the 
public schools. Albert Wood, father of the gracious pioneer woman to 
whom this sketch is dedicated, reclaimed much of his land to cultivation 
and was influential in community affairs during the entire period of his 
residence in Allen county. He died on his old homestead when he was 
sixty years of age, and his wife attained to the remarkable age of ninety 
years. He left to his widow and children the old homestead of one 
hundred and ten acres, and a part of the tract which he originally ob- 
tained from the government is now owned by Henry N. AVilliams, of Fcrt 
Wayne. Mary Jane Wood was reared under the conditions and influ- 
ences of the pioneer days and acquired her early education in the old- 
time log schoolhouse, the while she gave active assistance in the domes- 
tic activities of the modest but happy pioneer home. In 1849, at Hunter- 
town, was solemnized her marriage to James Oliver Beardsley, and he 
was fifty-six years of age at the time of his death, in 1878. During all 
of the long years from the time of her marriage to the present Mrs. 
Beardsley has lived continuously at Huntertown, save for a period of one 
year which she passed at Aub^^rn, Dekalb county. Under the administra- 
tion of President Grant her husband served two terms as postmaster at 
Huntertown, and for a time he held the position of deputy postmaster, 
besides having given effective service also as justice of the peace. Mr. 
Beardsley was a citizen of sterling character and marked ability, and he 
ever commanded the unqualified confidence and esteem of his fellow men. 
His political allegiance was given to the Republican party, he was a 
Master Mason, and was an earnest member of the Universalist church, 
as is also his widow, who owns and resides in one of the attractive homes 
of Huntertown and who is surrounded by a host of loyal and appreciative 
friends who accord to her the most sincere affection. Physical disability 
prevented Mr. Beardsley from serving as a soldier during the Civil war, 
but he supported the Union cause to the fullest extent of his ability, be- 
sides having paid for a substitute for one of his friends who had been 
called to the Union service but w^hose circumstances were such as to make 
it almost impossible for him to leave home. Mr. and Mrs, Beardsley be- 
came the parents of no children, but, lacking filial solicitude on this ac- 
count, Mrs. Beardsley feels a gracious compensation in the devoted love 
of her many friends. 

Montgomery G. Beaver, one of the essentially progressive and repre- 
sentative business men of his native city of Fort Wayne, is virtually the 
successor to the substantial lumber business that was here founded by 
his honored father more than half a century ago, the history of the enter- 
prise having been consecutive and having continued at all times in the 



52 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

control of the Beaver family, so that the extensive and important business 
now conducted by Montgomery G. Beaver, in the retail lumber trade and 
the operation of a most modern planing mill, may consistently be noted 
as one of the pioneer industrial and commercial enterprises of the metropo- 
lis and judicial center of Allen county. Mr. Beaver was born in Fort 
Wayne April 10, 1867, and is a son of Augustus and Mary Emily (Parks) 
Beaver, both of whom are now deceased, the father having l3een born 
in Pennsylvania and the mother in Indiana, in which latter commonwealth 
their marriage was solemnized. Of their two children the subject of this 
review is the younger, and his sister, Florence, is the wife of Watson 
Nicholson, of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Augustus Beaver established him- 
self in the wholesale lumber business at Fort Wayne more than fifty 
years ago, and as a man of energy, uprightness and sagacity, he developed 
a most prosperous business, his status as one of the prominent business 
men and influential citizens of Fort Wayne having been maintained until 
his death, which occurred when he was about 80 years of age. He con- 
tributed materially to the civic and commercial prosperity of the city 
and county and his name merits an enduring place in the history of Fort 
Wayne. Montgomery G. Beaver made good use of the advantages 
afforded in the public schools of Fort Wayne and as a youth became 
closely associated with his father's lumber business. By personal inclina- 
tion and ambition, as well as through paternal direction and encourage- 
ment, he thoroughly informed himself in all details of the business, and 
he is a recognized authority in lumber and building material values, as 
well as in the technical details of manufacturing in this line. At the age 
of 21 years he was admitted to partnership in his father's business, and 
after the death of his mother he purchased the entire business, which he 
has since conducted in an individual and distinctively successful way, 
the enterprise being now of retail rather than wholesale order and a well 
equipped planing mill having been operated as an important adjunct of 
the enterprise. In the spring of 1917 Mr. Beaver completed the erection 
and equipment of a new planing mill of the best modern standard, the 
building being of brick and steel construction and thoroughly fire-proof. 
The plant has its own electrical equipment throughout, the machinery 
and accessories are of the latest improved order, and the mill has ample 
capacity for turning out the best work in an expeditious way. The office 
headquarters of the mill and lumber yards are at 2047 Broadway. In this 
connection Mr. Beaver gives employment to an average force of from 
fifteen to twenty men, including a number of skilled operatives in the 
mill. He is not only an alert, vigorous and progressive business man but 
also a loyal and public-spirited citizen, with secure place in the confidence 
and good will of the urban community that has ever represented his home. 
His political allegiance is given to the Republican party, he is a valued 
member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, in the Masonic fraternity 
he has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, besides being affiliated with the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, and both he and his wife are members of Plymouth Congre- 
gational church. January 10, 1893, recorded the marriage of Mr. Beaver 
to Miss Edith R. Cutshall, who likewise was born and reared in Fort 
Wayne, and whose father, William H. Cutshall, is now a retired farmer 
of this county, his wife being deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Beaver have one 
son, Melvin Montgomery, who is associated with his father's lumber 
business. He was graduated in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 53 

as a member of the class of 1916, and in that institution completed both 
literary and business courses. 

Sylvanus B. Bechtel. — The application of ability and energy to his 
service with S. F. Bowser & Company has brought to Mr. Bechtel consecu- 
tive and noteworthy advancement with this important Fort Wayne con- 
cern, and he now holds the exacting and responsible office of general 
manager, with secure status as one of the representative business men 
of the younger generation in Allen county's metropolis and judicial 
center. Mr. Bechtel was born in Barry county, Michigan, June 17, 1878, 
and the place of his nativity was the fine old homestead farm of his 
parents, Joseph K. and Mary (Benjamin) Bechtel, the former of whom 
was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, and the latter in the state 
of Pennsylvania. The father long held prestige as one of the substantial 
farmers and honored citizens of southern Michigan, where he continued 
his identification with the basic industries of agriculture and stock- 
growing until the time of his death, his widow now being a resident of 
Toledo, Ohio. Of the children the eldest is William H., who resides at 
Caro, Tuscola county, Michigan ; Barbara is the wife of Guy E. Pierson, 
of Wayland, Allegan county, that state ; Clarence W. died when about 
37 years of age ; the subject of this review was the next in order of 
birth ; and Roy W. is now a resident of the city of Toledo, Ohio. Sylvanus 
B. Bechtel continued his studies in the public schools of Michigan until 
he had completed the prescribed curriculum of the high school at Way- 
land, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1894. There- 
after he proved the solidity and efficacy of his academic discipline by three 
years of successful service as a teacher in the schools of his native state 
and after his retirement from the pedagogic profession he went to the 
city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he held a position in the business 
department of the Daily Democrat until 1899, when he came to Indiana 
and established his home in fort Wayne. He arrived in this city in July 
of that year and entered the employ of S. F. Bowser & Company, his 
original post in the office of this representative manufacturing concern 
having been that of correspondent. He was soon given charge of the 
collection department, and of this position he continued the incumbent 
until June 1, 1901, when he was promoted to the post of superintendent 
of salesmen. One year later he was advanced to the management of the 
mail-order and advertising department; on January 1, 1906, he became 
assistant general manager ; and on the 1st of March, 1914, there came the 
ultimate in the recognition of his ability and efficient service, when he 
was appointed to his present important office, that of general manager. 
The record made by Mr. Bechtel during the period of his association with 
this company bears its own significance and denotes the fiber and pro- 
gressiveness of the man himself. In politics Mr. Bechtel is arrayed with 
the progressive wing of the Republican party; he and his wife hold 
membership in the South Fort Wayne Baptist church ; he is affiliated with 
York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity, as well as the 
adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, and he is a popular member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, 
the Quest Club, the Fort Wayne Country Club, and the University Club 
of Fort Wayne. On the 27th of June, 1900, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Bechtel to Miss Marie M. Russell, who was born in Fort Wayne 
and who is a daughter of William J. and Mary (Brew) Russell, her 
parents being now residents of Grand Rapids, Michigan, where her father 



54 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

holds the position of master carpenter for the Grand Rapids & Indiana 
Railroad. Mr. and Mrs. Bechtel have two children — Kenneth B. and 
Mary Catherine. 

Henry W. Becker has proved a loyal and influential figure in connec- 
tion with business and civic affairs in his native city of Fort Wayne, 
where he is now giving characteristically efficient service as a member of 
the municipal board of public works, an office of which he has been the 
incumbent continuously since 1905 and in which he has done much to 
further the efficient and important work of this department of the munici- 
pal government. Mr. Becker was born in Fort Wayne February 21, 1859, 
and is a son of Frederick and Margaret (Jennewein) Becker, both natives 
of Swaarbriiken, Prussia, Germany, where they were reared and educated 
and where their marriage was solemnized. The parents of the subject 
of this review came to America in 1848, a year specially marked by large 
immigration from Germany to the United States, and the father became 
one of the successful exponents of the blacksmith trade and business in 
Fort Wayne, where he commanded unqualified popular esteem and was a 
substantial citizen at the time of his death, in 1882, at the age of sixty- 
three years, his widow having survived him by several years and both 
having been earnest communicants of the Lutheran church, his political 
convictions having been shown forth in the loyal support which he gave 
to the cause of the Democratic party. Of the children the eldest is 
Frederick, Jr., who still resides in Fort Wayne, as do also Minnie, Charles 
and Mary, Henry W., of this review, being the youngest of the number. 
Henry W. Becker acquired his early education in the parochial school 
of the Lutheran church on Barr street, and as a youth he served a 
thorough apprenticeship to the stonecutter's trade, which, as a skilled 
artisan, he followed for the long period of twenty years, within which he 
was concerned in much important contract work in his native city. His 
induction into public service came when he was chosen deputy assessor 
of Wayne township, and his effective service in this capacity made him 
a normal candidate when, in 1900, he was elected township assessor, on 
the Democratic ticket. Of this office he continued the incumbent four 
years, and then, in April, 1905, he was appointed a member of the board 
of public works of Fort Wayne, under the administration of Mayor Henry 
C. Berghoff. He has received reappointment under each successive mayor 
and is one of the valued factors in connection with the administration of 
public affairs in his native city, to which his loyalty is of the most insistent 
type. As may be inferred from a foregoing statement, he is found arrayed 
as a staunch advocate of the principles of the Democratic party. On the 
3d of September, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Becker to 
Miss Lavina Englert, a daughter of the late Frank Englert, of Fort 
Wayne, and of the children of this union Magdalin and Margaret still 
remain at the parental home ; Florence is the wife of Paul Lauer, of Fort 
Wayne ; and Henry Roy and Frederick are still members of the parental 
circle. 

William Becker. — The German contingent in Allen county, Indiana, 
has from the early days been one of prominence and influence in the 
furtherance of social and industrial advancement and prosperity. He 
whose name initiates this paragraph was born in the province of Hanover, 
Germany, October 25, 1860, and was a vigorous and ambitious young man 
of twenty-three years when he came to America and established his home 
in Allen county. His parents, Henry and Sophia (Tye) Becker, passed 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 55 

their entire lives in the German fatherland, and of their seven children the 
subject of this review was the sixth in order of birth; Henry died in 
Germany; Jacob still resides in his native province; Ferdinand died in 
Germany; August is a retired grocer residing in Fort "Wayne and now 
gives his attention to the handling of bonds and other high grade secur- 
ities, he and the subject of this sketch being the only representatives of 
the immediate family circle in the United States ; Minnie and Sophia, the 
only daughters, both died in their native land. After duly profiting by 
the advantages offered in the excellent common schools of his home 
province William Becker there attended the Lutheran parochial schools 
for four years, after which he completed an effective course in a business 
college at Petershagen. The promptings of youthful ambitions led him 
to sever the home ties when he was a young man of twenty-three years, 
and his success during the intervening period has fully justified his course 
in immigrating to America and establishing the stage of his activities in 
Allen county. Here he has become one of the specially energetic and pro- 
gressive farmers of Adams township, though his original field of activity 
was in Wayne township, where he lived during the early period of his 
residence in the county. When Mr. Becker purchased the present model 
farm of one hundred and thirty acres the place was equipped with eleven 
primitive log buildings and in general had little suggestion of the thrift 
and prosperity now in evidence. The old buildings have been replaced 
by modern structures of the best type, including the attractive and com- 
modious farm residence, which is equipped with modern improvements, 
including a hot-water heating system, and Mr. Becker has further im- 
proved the place by constructing good fences, by clearing away much 
underbrush and by bringing his land up to the best stage of productive- 
ness. He is essentially one of the vigorous, progressive and successful 
representatives of the basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing 
in Allen county, and in all of the relations of life he has so borne himself 
as to command the confidence and good will of his fellow men. He is a 
staunch and valiant supporter and advocate of the cause of the Republican 
party and has been one of its influential representatives in Adams town- 
ship, where he served one term as township supervisor. He and his wife 
are active communicants of the German Lutheran church in the village 
of New Haven, which is about 1% miles distant from their fine rural 
home. November 3, 1887, recorded the marriage of Mr. Becker to Miss 
Sophia Fuelling, who was born and reared in Adams county, Indiana, 
a daughter of Frederick and Lizetta (Mayland) Fuelling, both of whom 
were born in Germany, both having been young folk when they became 
residents of Fort Wayne, Indiana, where their marriage was solemnized 
and whence they removed to Adams county, where the father passed the 
remainder of his life as a prosperous farmer, the widowed mother having 
later returned to Fort Wayne, where she died at a venerable age. Of the 
children of this honored couple the eldest was Louise, who became the 
wife of Frederick Kukelhan, both having been killed in a railroad accident 
at Maples, Allen county, November 9, 1907; Frederick is a resident of 
Root township, Adams county ; William and Charles died in infancy ; Mrs. 
Becker was the next in order of birth ; William remains on the old home- 
stead farm in Adams county; Otto died in infancy; Elizabeth is the wife 
of Gottlieb Berger, who is engaged in the dry goods business in Fort 
Wayne, with a well appointed establishment on Calhoun street; Ernest 
maintains his home in Root township, Adams county ; and Minnie died in 



56 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Becker have but one child, Arthur, who is asso- 
ciated with his father in the work and management of the home farm ; he 
wedded Miss Edith Behrman, and their two children are Naomi and 
Wilma. 

Fred C. Beckman is a son of Edward Beckman and the grandson 
of Henry Beckman, who settled in Washington township as early as 
1832, spent his life there and there reared his family. Among his chil- 
dren was Edward, who married Eliza Gerding, and they became the 
parents of ten children — Edward, Louis, Louise, Sophia, Justine, Eliza, 
Fred C, Herman, Julia and Charlotte. The two named last are deceased, 
each dying at the age of six years. In 1892 Edward Beckman was 
elected treasurer of Allen county, was re-elected in 1894 and served in 
that capacity until January 1, 1897. Fred C. Beckman was born on 
August 9, 1881, reared in Washington township and educated in its 
schools. He began farm life on the home place, continuing to make 
that his home until 1906, when he took up his residence in St. Joseph 
township. He is living now in that community and is the owner of 
one hundred and forty acres in Section 6. He has made practically all 
the improvements himself and the place is in a much better state of 
productiveness than when it came into his hands. The buildings have 
been remodeled under his supervision, fences have been erected and 
tiling has been put in, so that the farm is today one of the fine places 
of the township. General farming and stock-raising are carried on suc- 
cessfully. Mr. Beckman was married on May 24, 1906, to Miss Amelia 
Henschen, daughter of Frederick and Amelia (Rehorst) Henschen, farm- 
ing people of Washington township, where they are still resident. Four 
children have been born to the Beckman house — Lucile, Herbert, Ruth 
and Morris. The family are members of St. Paul's Lutheran church at 
Fort Wayne. 

Herman Beckman has been the exponent of progressive methods in 
his operations as a farmer in Washington township, and his home is 
one of the finest examples of modern building that is to be found in 
the township today, if not, indeed, the finest. His farm is up-to-date in 
every detail and reflects much credit upon its owner. Mr. Beckman 
is one of the younger farmers of the community. He was born on Jan- 
uary 11, 1884, in Washington township, son of Edward and Eliza (Ger- 
ding) Beckman, concerning whom extended mention will be found on 
other pages of this work. Herman Beckman attended the common 
schools of his native village as a boy and applied himself to farming 
on the home place, where he is still in charge. He now is the owner 
of one hundred and seventy acres in Washington township, on which 
he has carried on progressive and profitable farming that has placed 
him in the front ranks of the successful men of the village. He has 
lately completed the erection of a fine modern bungalow, so well planned 
and carried out that further mention may properly be accorded to it. 
The place is equipped with every modern convenience, and no city dwell- 
ing is better provided with the comforts of urban life than is this farm 
house of Mr. Beckman 's. Electric lights, modern furnace, open plumb- 
ing, hot and cold running water, modern laundry equipment in basement 
with clothes chute from top floors to laundry and service elevators from 
kitchen to basement, make up some of the labor-saving devices and 
aids to comfort that are so necessary in these days and so seldom found 
in the farm home. Mr. Beckman was married, in 1909, to Marie Schow, 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 57 

daughter of Ludwig Schow, concerning whom extended space is given 
elsewhere in these pages. He and his wife are members of St. Paul's 
Lutheran church in Fort Wayne and in politics he is a Democrat. He 
is not active in local politics beyond the demands of good citizenship 
and has no fraternal affiliations. 

John Beckstein is one of the native sons of Allen county who is 
aiding definitely in the upholding of its prestige along the line of agri- 
cultural enterprise and is one of the substantial farmers and represent- 
ative citizens of St. Joseph township, where he is the owner of a well- 
improved farm of eighty acres, in Section 29. Mr. Beckstein was born 
in the township that is now his place of residence and the date of his 
nativity was August 14, 1861. He is a son of John and Frederica 
(Bufink) Beckstein, both of whom were born in Germany and were 
young at the time of coming to America. They settled in St. Joseph 
township more than half a century ago and the present farm of their 
son John, of this review, is a part of their old homestead, upon which 
they continued to reside until their death. Of the children only three 
are now living — John, George and Henry. The mother passed to the 
life eternal, in 1877, and the father was one of the venerable and honored 
pioneer citizens of St, Joseph township at the time of his death, in 
September, 1914. He whose name introduces this article was reared 
to the sturdy discipline of the farm, profited duly by the advantages 
of the schools of his native township, and has never faltered in his alle- 
giance to the basic industry of agriculture, through the medium of which 
he has achieved definite success. He owns and resides upon a portion 
of his father's old homestead farm, as previously stated, and upon the 
same has made numerous improvements that mark the demesne as a model 
farm. Industry and good management have characterized his activities 
as an agriculturist and stock-grower, he is independent in politics, has 
had no inclination toward public office, but takes loyal interest in those 
things that touch the communal welfare. Both he and his wife hold 
membership in St. John's Reformed church in the city of Fort Wayne. 
The home farm is about four miles distant from the city mentioned and 
receives service on rural mail route No. 15 from the county seat. On 
November 28, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Beckstein to 
Miss Christina Denges, who likewise was born and reared in this county, 
a daughter of Christian and Elizabeth (Hansel) Denges, her parents 
having been children at the time of the imigration of the respective 
families from Germany to America and both families having established 
homes in Allen county in the pioneer days. Of the ten children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Denges five are living — Henry, Christ, Caroline, Sophia 
and Christina. Mr. and Mrs. Beckstein have five children, namely: 
Walter, Selma, John, Jr., Edna and Hilda. 

George W. Beers has been a resident of Fort Wayne for nearly a 
quarter of a century and has been specially prominent and influential in 
the promotion of industrial enterprises — notably along the line of public 
utilities. It was under his personal direction that the lines of the Postal 
Telegraph Cable Company were brought into Fort Wayne, he was the 
chief factor in effecting the organization of the Home Telephone Company, 
of which he was the first president, and he has not only been a strong, 
positive and efficient force in the establishing of independent telephone 
services but has also been prominent in the manufacture and distribution 
of gas in northern Indiana. He is one of the substantial and valued 



58 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

citizens of Allen county and is entitled to definite representation in this 
history. Mr. Beers was born in Darke county, Ohio, on the 7th of June, 
1859, and is a son of the late William J. and Amanda (Ward) Beers, both 
of whom passed the closing years of their lives in the old Buckeye state, 
where the father had been for many years an able and successful member 
of the bar of Van Wert county. Of the five children only George W. 
and Kate are now living, and the latter is the wife of Walter S. Allyn, of 
Cleveland, Ohio. In the public schools of his native state Mr. Beers 
acquired his early education and as a youth he gained practical experi- 
ence in surveying and general civil engineering work. In this connection 
he was associated with the engineering corps that had charge of the con- 
struction out of Van Wert of the Cincinnati Northern Railroad. Later he 
was concerned prominently with timber development enterprises, mainly 
in the state of West Virginia, and in 1893 he established his permanent 
home in Fort Wayne. He has done much in furthering enterprises along 
the line of applied electricity, and, as before stated, he had charge of the 
extending of the Postal Telegraph lines into Fort Wayne, besides which 
he was the dominating force in establishing the system of the Home 
Telephone Company in Allen county and has otherwise been prominently 
interested in the exploiting and establishing of independent telephone 
lines. A business man of circumspection, energy and initiative, Mr. Beers 
has made a most successful record, and as a citizen he has been liberal 
and progressive. Well fortified in his convictions concerning govern- 
mental and economic policies, he is independent in politics and instead of 
being restricted by mere partisanship he gives his support to men and 
measures meeting the approval of his judgment. In the Masonic fra- 
ternity he is a Knight Templar, a member of the Mystic Shrine and has 
received also the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite. Both he and his wife are members of the First Presbyterian church 
of Fort Wayne. In 1884 Avas solemnized the marriage of Mr. Beers to 
Miss Catherine Numbers, who was born at Decatur, Adams county, 
Indiana, and the two children of this union are Dan N., who is identified 
with business interests in Fort Wayne, and Ruth, who is the wife of 
William T. McKay, of this city. 

Joseph W. Bell has been a resident of Fort Wayne for nearly forty 
years and during this long period he has been continuously identified 
with business interests that have had distinct bearing on the civic and 
material prosperity of the community. For twenty years he was here 
engaged in the wholesale saddlery and hardware business, and since his 
retirement therefrom, in 1911, he has given his attention to the real 
estate business, in which his operations have been confined to the handling 
of his own properties, entirely aside from commission transactions. He is 
the owner of valuable realty in Fort Wayne, both improved and unim- 
proved, and his activities in his present line of enterprise are conducive 
to further development and progress in the metropolis of Allen county, 
even as his previous business enterprise contributed to the commercial 
prestige of Fort Wayne. In the agnatic line Mr. Bell is of sterling Scotch 
lineage, as a scion of the third generation of the family in America, and 
in his character and achievement he has manifested the inviolable integ- 
rity for which the Scotch people have ever been noted. Joseph William 
Bell was born at Coshocton, Ohio, and the date of his nativity was De- 
cember 1, 1853. He is the eldest in a family of three children, and the 
other two are Mrs. Laura Bell LcM^is, of Cleveland, Ohio, and George A. 
Bell, of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Benjamin Franklin Bell, father of him 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 59 

whose name initiates this article, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and was 
but seven years of age at the time of the family immigration to America. 
He here acquired a liberal education, and his advantages included those 
of the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware. He prepared himself for 
and entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he gave 
many years of earnest, able and consecrated service in the vineyard of 
the Master. For ten years he was pastor of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Delaware, Ohio, and thereafter he held various other pastoral 
charges, including a number of important order, the closing years of his 
life having been passed at Wellington, Ohio, where he died at the age of 
59 years, his cherished and devoted wife, a woman of singularly gracious 
personality, having been 48 years of age when she was summoned to 
the life eternal. At the age of twenty-four years Rev. Benjamin F. Bell 
wedded Miss Lucinda McMorris, daughter of Joseph McMorris, who was 
a successful millwright and prominent citizen of Dresden, Muskingum 
county, Ohio, and concerning the three children of this union due mention 
has already been made in this context. Joseph W. Bell was signally 
favored in being reared in a home of culture and refinement and his 
public school education was supplemented by a course in his father's alma 
mater, the Ohio Wesleyan University. At the age of twenty-five years 
he entered the wholesale hardware business at Mansfield, Ohio, where he 
remained five years. He then, in 1885, came to Fort Wayne, where he 
has since maintained his home and where for twenty years, as previously 
noted, he was successfully established in the wholesale hardware and 
saddlery business. Mr. Bell has always stood exponent of loyal and 
public-spirited citizenship, has given unfaltering allegiance to the Re- 
publican party, has become affiliated with the York, Scottish Rite and 
Shrine bodies of the Masonic fraternity, is an active member of the Fort 
Wayne Commercial Club, and both he and his wife were members of 
the Presbyterian church. On the 26th of December, 1877, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Bell to Miss Elizabeth Reed, daughter of the late 
Nicholas S. Reed, of Mansfield, Ohio, and the two children of this union 
are Guy Reed Bell and Benjamin Rector Bell, both of whom are associated 
with their father in the real estate business, as representative young men 
of Fort Wayne. 

Henry E. Bell, who has been the popular mail carrier on rural routes 
Nos. 2 and 5, from the village of New Haven, since 1907, is a scion of 
one of the well-known families of Allen county, where the marriage 
of his parents was solemnized, but he claims the Sunflower State as 
the place of his nativity. He was born in Reno county, Kansas, Sep- 
tember 12, 1872, a son of Robert S. and Lucy (Burgess) Bell, the former 
of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Allen county, 
Indiana, where her parents settled in the pioneer days. The mother 
passed to the life eternal, in 1876, and the subject of this sketch is 
the eldest of the three children, the other two being Eugene H. and 
Robert. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Bell removed 
to Kansas, where they gained a due quota of pioneer experience, and 
upon their return to Allen county settled on a farm in Jefferson town- 
ship. The father became one of the substantial agriculturists of the 
township, made good improvements on his farm, including the erection 
of excellent buildings, and he lives in New Haven, the death of his wife 
having occurred in 1877. Henry E. Bell was about two years old at 
the time of his parents' return from Kansas to Allen county, where 



60 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

he was reared to manhood on the home farm and where he profited 
by the advantages offered in the schools of Jefferson township. He 
continued his active alliance with agricultural enterprise until he assumed 
his present position as rural mail carrier, in which his service has given 
unequivocal satisfaction and in which he has made a fine rcord, as 
attested by the commendation of the patrons of the two routes which 
receive his attention. In politics Mr. Bell is a Republican, and he is 
affiliated at New Haven with the organizations of the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On October 5, 
1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bell to Matilda J. Cameron. 
She is a daughter of James and Matilda Cameron, the former of whom 
was born in Scotland and the latter in Allen county, Indiana, where 
their marriage was solemnized, Mrs. Bell being the first in a family 
of seven children and the names of the others being here designated: 
John A., Martha Maude, Harriett G., one who died in infancy, Lily 
May, Mary Winona and James Ross. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have no children, 
but Mrs. Bell has one son by a former marriage — Roy M. Tirabrook, 
who is associated in the conducting of an automobile garage in the city 
of Fort Wayne. 

Gustave Bengs. — The Engineering Company, located at Fort Wayne, 
of which Gustave Bengs and his brother are the moving spirits, is one of 
the leading enterprises of its kind in the state. It was organized in 1907, 
and in 1908 it was incorporated under the laws of the state, at which 
time the capital stock was increased from $15,000 to $100,000. The com- 
pany engages in the manufacture of beams, channels, angles, plates, 
sheets, steel for buildings, iron stairs, ornamental railings and grills, 
with special attention given to the manufacture of machinery for use in 
milk condensing, their product in that line being used from coast to 
coast. The factories are established at the corner of Winter street and 
the Wabash railroad, and they have most admirable facilities there for 
the efficient handling of their products. Gustave Bengs is of German 
origin, born in that country on January 2, 1871, and he is the son of 
Herman and Anna (Alf) Bengs, both of German birth and ancestry. 
The father was a stone cutter by trade and came to Fort Wayne with his 
family in 1883, direct from Germany. The parents, who are no longer 
living, reared a family of nine children. All survive but two, and the 
subject was the fourth born in the family. He had his education for 
the most part in Fort Wayne, attending first the parochial school of the 
German Lutheran church, and later entering the old Methodist College, 
where he took a course in mechanical engineering. Following his gradu- 
ation from that institution Mr. Bengs entered upon an apprenticeship in 
the Bass Foundry & Machine shop in Fort Wayne, and he served long 
and faithfully in that shop, adding to his college training valuable 
experience that has since proved itself of inestimable value to him in 
his business. Leaving the shop he engaged in business with Frank Gruber 
in a boiler making enterprise, and after eighteen months sold his interest 
to his partner, after which he went to Philadelphia and entered the service 
of the John Baizley Iron Works. He was there for about five years, 
and from Philadelphia he went to Los Angeles, California, in search of 
a suitable location for business. He spent six months in that quest and 
returning to Fort Wayne joined his one-time partner, Frank Gruber, 
continuing with him for two years. Once more he sold out to his partner, 
this time to engage in business with his brother, Otto, who is his partner 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLExM COUNTY 61 

today in the business conducted under the name of The Engineering 
Company, whose activities have been described in an opening paragraph. 
The Bsngs brothers have every reason to feel pride in their accomplish- 
ments in the past ten years as the proprietors of this thriving business, 
and they have won the confidence and good will of the business interests 
of the city. Mr. Bengs married Anna Heine in August, 1898. She is a 
daughter of Fort Wayne, and her family has long been established in 
the county. Mr. and Mrs. Bengs have three children — Herbert, Raymond 
and Alfred — fine boys who are growing up in the public schools of the 
city, and who give promise of splendid futures. The family are members 
of the German Lutheran church and Mr. Bengs is a Republican in politics, 
but not a politician. 

Edward P. Bennigen, whose well-developed executive ability comes 
into efi'ective play in his native city, has won by his own ability and 
efforts a merited advancement in the service of the Pennsylvania Pail- 
road Company, in the freight department of which in the city of Fort 
Wayne he is now serving as chief bill clerk. Mr. Bennigen was born 
in Fort Wayne, August 24, 1872, a son of Henry E. and Mary C. (Meyer) 
Bennigen, the former of whom was born in New Jersey and the latter in 
Fort Wayne, both having been of sterling German lineage and having 
passed the closing years of their worthy and unassuming lives in Fort 
Wayne, the father having been for nineteen years employed as a skilled 
machinist in the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He 
was a sterling citizen who commanded the esteem of all M^ho knew 
him and both he and his wife were earnest communicants of the Catholic 
church. Of their nine children the subject of this review- is the eldest; 
Charles F. still resides in Fort Wayne, as does also Bertha, who is 
the wife of Louis Neef ; Agnes is the wife of Edward Wehmeyer, of this 
city; George W. and Arthur still reside in Fort Wayne; Estella is the 
wife of Oliver Reed, of this city ; Esther died in childhood ; and Albert 
likewise resides in his native city. Edward P. Bennigen acquired his 
early education in the German parochial schools of the Catholic church 
in Fort Wayne but began to depend largely upon his own resources 
when he was a lad of but thirteen years. For a time he was employed 
in a local clothing store and later found employment along mechanical 
lines in the Olds Wagon Works, with which he continued his association 
until 1893. In the following year he entered the service of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and in 1895 began his work in its freight 
department, with which he has since been identified and in which he 
has won advancement to the responsible position of chief bill clerk. 
He gives his political allegiance to the Republican party, is affiliated 
with the Knights of Columbus and both he and his wife are communi- 
cants of the Cathedral parish of the Catholic church in their home city 
On June 27, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bennigen to 
Miss Amelia N. Hitchens, who was born in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and they have two children — Elva Mary, who was born July 6, 1907, 
and Kenneth C, who was born March 19, 1909. 

John Benzinger. — Among the many successful and capable farmers 
of Marion township who claim that prosperous community as their birth- 
place may be mentioned John Benzinger, who was born in Marion town- 
ship on June 29, 1859, the son of Fred and Catherine Benzinger. Fred 
Benzinger was born in New York state of German parents, and he ac- 
companied them to Allen county as a boy. They drove an ox team across 



62 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the country and experienced many hardships that made the trip a life- 
long memory to all who participated and were of sufficient years to re- 
member anything. The family settled on a tract of land in Marion 
township, and John Benzinger is the owner of that farm today. A single 
cabin of logs with old time puncheon floor was the first rude home that 
sheltered the Benzingers, in marked contrast to the commodious dwelling 
that is the family home of the representative of the name at this time. 
Fred Benzinger was a farmer all his life, a hard working man and a good 
citizen, and he was able to accumulate some property during his active 
years. He was a Democrat and a member of the German Lutheran 
church, and his children numbered seven. John, the first born, is the 
immediate subject of this family review. Fred lives in Fort Wayne. May 
is married. Rosa is the wife of Henry Rievel. Lena is deceased, as is also 
the seventh child, the latter dying in infancy. John Benzinger had his 
education in the German Lutheran schools of his community, and early 
learned to apply himself to the duties that presented themselves in the 
management of the home place with his father. He continued there until 
the death of Fred Benzinger, when he inherited the home place, and from 
then on he gradually accumulated other properties in the township. He 
carries on diversified farming on a generous scale, enjoying a well mer- 
ited success in his work. He is a Democrat in politics, prominent in local 
politics, and a member of the German Lutheran church from infancy. He 
was married in January, 1888, to Miss Carolina Waterback, who was 
born in Germany. They have three children — Frederick, William and 
Mary, the two younger ones still at home with the parents. 

Gustav A, Berghoff. — See Rub-No-More. 

Hubert Berghoff has been closely associated with his elder brothers, 
Herman, now of Chicago, Henry, and his younger brother, Gustave, in 
the development of one of the important industrial enterprises of Fort 
Wayne, that of the Berghoff Brewing Association, but in 1908 impaired 
health caused him to retire from active business, though he still is the 
nominal secretary of the Rub-No-More Soap Company, which has de- 
veloped in Fort Wayne an extensive and prosperous manufacturing en- 
terprise that adds materially to the city's commercial prestige. Hubert 
Berghoff was born in the town of Dortmund, Westphalia, Prussia, and the 
date of his nativity was November 21, 1860, his parents, Anthony and 
Elizabeth (Boellhauve) Berghoff, having passed their entire lives in that 
section of the German empire ; the father died in 1777 and the mother in 
1884. He whose name introduces this article gained his early education 
in the excellent schools in his native land, and he was nineteen years of 
age when he severed the home ties and came to America, where, on the 
12th of February, 1880, he joined his elder brothers, Herman and Henry, 
who had establislied their residence in Fort Wayne and concerning whom 
further mention is made on other pages of this publication. During the 
earlier years of his residence in Fort Wayne Hubert Berghoff' was as- 
sociated with the wholesale house of A. C. Trentman, and in 1889 ' he 
formed an alliance with his two brothers in establishing the enterprise 
that has been developed into the extensive business now controlled by 
the Berghoff Brewing Association. As previously stated, he has been prac- 
tically retired from active business responsibilities since 1908. Like his 
brothers, Mr. Berghoff' has proved one of the liberal and public-spirited 
citizens of Fort Wayne and has supported measures and enterprises that 
have tended to advance the civic and material prosperity of the com- 
munity. On October 11, 1882, was solemnized his marriage to Miss 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 63 

Johanna Mayer, daughter of Lawrence Mayer and a representative of 
one of the old and influential families of Allen county. Of the children 
of this union the eldest is Hubert, Jr., who is bookkeeper in the offices of 
the Berghoff Brewing Association ; Herman is similarly engaged in the 
offices of the Rub-No-More Soap Company; Henry E. is secretary and 
treasurer of the Fort Wayne Carriage Works; and Elizabeth remains at 
the parental home. 

Forrest B. Beyer, of the Beyer Grocery Company, of Fort Wayne, 
has proved a vital and resourceful factor in the developing of the sub- 
stantial wholesale business now controlled by this representative com- 
mercial concern and is known not only as one of the influential young 
business men of the metropolis of Allen county but also as one of specially 
high scholastic and scientific attainments. Mr. Beyer was born at North 
Manchester, Wabash county, Indiana, May 21, 1886, and is a son of 
Cyrus C. and Melissa Catherine (Baker) Beyer, who now maintain their 
home in the city of Kendallville, Noble county, where the father is 
engaged in the wholesale produce business, besides which he is one of the 
interested principals in the Beyer Grocery Company, at Fort Wayne. 
Forrest B. Beyer was a boy at the time of the family removal to Ken- 
dallville, where he continued his studies in the public schools until he 
had completed the curriculum of the high school. In pursuance of his 
higher educational discipline he entered historic old Yale University, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1908 and from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Later he completed a 
post-graduate course in Leland Stanford Junior University, at Palo Alto, 
California, and from this institution he received the degree of Master of 
Arts. For one year thereafter he served as chemist for the Twenty-Mule 
Team Borax Company at Alameda, California, and later he held the 
position of organic chemist for the Bureau of Science at Manila, P. I. In 
1913 he came to Fort Wayne and associated himself with the wholesale 
grocery business then conducted under the title of Beyer Brothers Com- 
pany, and this alliance he has since continued with marked success, the 
concern having been reorganized in 1916 under the present title of the 
Beyer Grocery Company. His associates in the substantial and constantly 
expanding enterprise are his father, and George H. Crouse and Irvin W. 
house through its trade territory, and in the establishment itself an 
Von Gunten. Four traveling salesmen represent this wholesale grocery 
house through its trade territory; and in the establishment itself an 
adequate corps of clerical and general assistants is maintained. Mr. 
Beyer takes lively interest in all things tending to advance the commercial 
and civic welfare and progress of the Summit City, is an active member 
of the local Commercial Club and Rotary Club, and is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity. On the 1st of September, 1909, Mr. Beyer wedded 
Miss Ethel C. Reyher, daughter of Jacob Reyher, of Kendallville, and the 
one child of this union is Forrest B., Jr., who was born November 5, 1914. 

Clarence F. Bicknell. — When Clarence Ford Bicknell came to Fort 
Wayne, in 1902, to assume the management of the Fort Wayne Daily 
News, every newspaper in the city entered upon a period of develop- 
ment until, today, no city of its size in America can boast of superior 
purveyors of the news of the world or more effective wielders of public 
opinion. Mr, Bicknell was born on a farm near Freelandville, Knox 
county, Indiana, December 26, 1864. In his native town he attended 
the public schools and the German Evangelical schools. The death of 



64 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

his father, wheu Clarence had reached the age of twelve, brought to 
him early in life the necessity of making his own way in the world, 
and he commenced by engaging in farm work during his summer vaca- 
tions while continuing his studies in the winter. At the age of sixteen 
he began the teaching of a rural school and was engaged for two 
winters at the same school. The next few years of his experience form 
an interesting study, but the true philosophy of his activities is shown 
by the use to which he put his experience. The fact that he was a student 
in the University of Indiana at Bloomington, from 1883 to 1885, that 
he left the university at the end of his sophomore year, and, within 
a short time, was "wiping" engines at night in the roundhouse of the 
Burlington railroad at Lincoln Nebraska, brings to the mind an inquiry 
which is readily answered by Mr. Bicknell himself who says that his 
earnest desire, on leaving school was to "go west and grow up with 
the country." The Lincoln railroad shops offered the opportunity and 
Mr. Bicknell grasped it. For seven months, during his work in the 
roundhouse, he gathered much experience which has been of inesti- 
mable value to him in later years. From this work he was advanced 
to a clerkship in the office of the general superintendent of the road. 
During his three years in this capacity he perfected himself in stenog- 
raphy and his wider knowledge of the business of the department gave 
him an advancement to a position in the general passenger department of 
the Burlington road to Omaha. He remained here for four years, being 
promoted successively to the positions of head of the advertising depart- 
ment and cashier. In 1893, having for some time wished to enter busi- 
ness for himself, he purchased a weekly newspaper circulated in the 
towns of Gas City and Jonesboro, Indiana. In 1896, after a successful 
management of the property, he sold it, and, in connection with his 
brother, Ernest P. Bicknell, now Director General of Civilian Relief of 
the American Red Cross Society, purchased a controlling interest in the 
Terre Haute (Indiana) Tribune, of which publication he served as the 
business manager. In 1899 he sold the Tribune, but remained under 
contract as its manager until the spring of 1902, when he came to Fort 
Wayne and purchased the Fort Wayne Daily News for himself and 
his brother from William D. Page, its founder. Mr. Bicknell has man- 
aged the property with splendid success from the beginning of his con- 
nection with it. From a paper of small size and circulation, he has given 
it a high position of sustained popularity and influence. While a resi- 
dent of Omaha, Mr. Bicknell, at the age of twenty-three, was united 
in marriage with Miss Clara A. Sluss, of Bloomington, Indiana. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Bicknell have been born three daughters, Ruth, Marguerite 
and Winifred. Mr. Bicknell is a member of the South Wayne Baptist 
church. He is a Mason, a member of the Scottish Rite body and the 
Shrine, the Knights of Pythias, the Maccabees, the Commercial Club and 
the Quest Club. In politics he has always been a staunch exponent of 
the principles of the Republican party. For two years he occupied the 
position of chairman of the Republican party of the Twelfth Congres- 
sional District. Through the medium of his newspaper, his activity in 
many organizations, and his wide acquaintanceship, Mr. Bicknell has 
taken advantage of his exceptional opportunities to support every great 
public movement which has for its object the good of the many. 

Charles L. Biederwolf, the efficient and popular secretary of the 
Fort Wayne Commercial Club, naturally is unequivocally loyal to 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 65 

Indiana, as this is his native commonwealth, and he is not only a member 
of the bar of the state but has also gained broad experience through 
service as private secretary to two representatives of Indiana in the 
United States congress, so that, all in all, his activities have been of that 
broadening type that makes him specially eligible for the furtherance 
of the high civic ideals and progressive policies of the vigorous organiza- 
tion of which he is now serving as secretary. Mr. Biederwolf was born 
at Monticello, the judicial center of White county, Indiana, September 27, 
1876, and is a son of Michael and Abbie (Snetzer) Biederwolf, both of 
whom were born in the historic old city of Strassburg, Germany, and 
were married in Reading, Pennsylvania. Michael Biederwolf was a car- 
penter by trade but he eventually engaged in the lumber and coal busi- 
ness, in which he developed a prosperous enterprise, both he and his wife 
having been residents of Monticello at the time of their death and both 
having been earnest members of the Presbyterian church, the while the 
father was found arrayed as a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party. Charles L. Biederwolf continued his studies in the 
public schools of his native place until he had availed himself of the 
advantages of the high school, and thereafter he attended the Gem City 
Business College, at Quincy, Illinois, and Wabash College, at Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, in which latter he was a student for one year. In the prose- 
cution of his law studies he attended the law department of the University 
of Ohio for two years, as a member of the class of 1898, and he finished his 
technical course in the law department of the University of Indianapolis 
in which he was graduated in 1901, and from which he received his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, with virtually concomitant admission to the bar 
of his native state. In 1904 he established his home in Fort Wayne, and 
thereafter he served in turn as secretary to Hon. Newton W. Gilbert, 
representative of the Twelfth Indiana district in the United States con- 
gress, and the latter 's successor, Hon. Clarence C. Gilhams. His secre- 
tarial duties involved his residence in the city of Washington during the 
sessions of congress, and his effective services as secretary gave him a 
specially close and comprehensive knowledge of public affairs. His 
incumbency as secretary to Hon. Clarence C. Gilhams terminated in 1909, 
and on the 26th of March, 1910, he became secretary of the Fort Wayne 
Commercial Club. In this executive office he has done splendid service 
in systematizing and vitalizing the work of the club and has aided 
greatly in making it an influential exponent and promoter of the civic, 
industrial and commercial interests of Fort Wayne and Allen county. 
His popularity and the estimate placed on his administrative ability are 
further shown in his having been chosen secretary also of the Rotary 
Club of Fort Wayne, which position he held for one year. As implied 
by his service as secretary to the congressmen previously mentioned, Mr. 
Biederwolf is staunchly aligned as an advocate and supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party, and he takes lively interest in the party 
cause. In addition to his membership in the two representative clubs of 
which he is secretary, he is a member of the Fort Wayne Country Club, 
and he is affiliated with the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks and 
the Friars. January 28, 1904, gave record of the marriage of Mr. Bieder- 
wolf to Miss Katherine Shanahan, daughter of Michael and Mary Shana- 
han, of Wabash, this state, and both are popular in the social life of their 
home city. They have no children. 



66 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

William Bittler has given nearly half a century of effective service 
in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and is one of 
the veteran men of this corporation in the city of Fort Wayne. Tech- 
nical and executive ability on his part have not failed of official recog- 
nition in the passing years, and, since 1875, he has had full charge of 
the maintenance and repair work on the water stations of what is known 
as the western division of the Pennsylvania Lines — between Crestline 
and Chicago being the line over which he has jurisdiction in his assigned 
position. He has the status of an expert stone mason, and it was his 
ability along this line that led to his advancement in the service of the 
great corporation with which he has been long identified, the while his 
sterling characteristics and worthy achievement have brought and re- 
tained to him the fullest measure of official and popular confidence and 
good will. Mr. Bittler was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 19, 1850, and in the same historic old commonwealth were born his 
parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (Smith) Bittler, the father having been 
a shoemaker by trade and vocation and both he and his wife having 
been residents of Reading, Pennsylvania, at the time of their death. 
Of the children Mary, Rebecca and Leah are deceased ; Emma still resides 
at Reading, Pennsylvania; Hannah is the wife of Jacob Wannemaker, 
of New York city ; William, of this review, is the elder of the two sons ; 
and Samuel is a resident of Pennsylvania. As a boy and youth William 
Bittler gained practical experience and discipline in connection with 
farm industry in the old Keystone State and in the meanwhile attended 
the public schools when opportunity offered. At the age of sixteen 
years he made his way to Tiffin, Ohio, where he worked about eight 
months as a stone mason, a trade in which his natural predilections and 
careful application eventually gained to him full qualification as a jour- 
neyman. In 1868 he came to Fort Wayne and here was employed at 
his trade by the late Henry Paul, father of William Paul, who is still 
a resident of this city. On August 6th of the following year Mr. Bittler 
took a position as stonemason and pipe man in the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and then initiated his service in looking 
after the water stations of the company on the 'western division. In 
1875 his ability and effective service brought to him advancement and 
from that year to the present he has been in full charge of the work 
of keeping in proper condition the water stations of the company on 
the line between Crestline, Ohio, and the city of Chicago. Mr. Bittler 
is one of the oldest employes of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
attached to the Fort Wayne headquarters, is well known and held in 
high esteem among the railroad men and the same estimate is placed 
upon him by all others who know him. He has never swerved in his 
fealty to and appreciation of Fort Wayne, takes loyal interest in the 
city's prosperity and progress, has served as a trustee of the municipal 
water system, is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are earnest 
communicants of the Lutheran church, in the faith of which he was 
reared. On October 3, 1873, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bittler 
to Miss Mary Jacobs, who was born in Germany and came to America 
when young. Of the four children of Mr. and Mrs. Bittler the eldest 
is Edward, who is now assistant cashier of the People's Trust Company 
of Fort Wayne ; George is the recent state treasurer of Indiana ; Hannah 
remains at the parental home ; and Herman is identified with business 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 67 

interests in his native city, all of the children having honored the family 
name and the city of their nativity. 

Albert J. Black has been a resident of Allen county from the time 
of his infancy, has been for many years a successful representative of 
agricultural industry in Milan township and is a progressive and influ- 
ential citizen whose secure vantage-place in popular esteem is vouchsafed 
by his incumbency of the office of county commisioner, to which position 
he was elected in 1912 and in which he has been the earnest advocate 
and supporter of measures and enterprises that have conserved the best 
interests of the county and its people. Mr. Black was born in Erie county, 
Ohio, on the 18th of June, 1862, and is the only surviving child of Joseph 
and Matilda (Chester) Black, the former a native of Maryland and the 
latter of Ohio, their marriage having been solemnized in the Buckeye 
state and the father having been a sailor on the Great Lakes in his young 
manhood. The subject of this review was an infant at the time of the 
family removal from Ohio to Allen county, Indiana, in 1863, and here his 
father became a substantial farmer and representative citizen of Milan 
township, where he and his wife passed the residue of their lives. Albert 
J. B^ack acquired his early education in the public schools of Allen 
county, was reared to the invigorating discipline of the farm and during 
the long intervening j^ears he has not been deflected from the line of close 
allegiance to the basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing, of 
which he is now a prominent and enterprising exponent in this county, 
his well improved farm of one hundred acres being one of the model places 
of Mil an township and being still under his active supervision, though his 
official duties as county commissioner demanded his presence in Fort 
"Wayne during an appreciable portion of each year during his incum- 
bency of that position. Mr. Black is an active and influential Allen county 
representative of the Democratic party and prior to his election to the 
office of county commisioner had served four years as township trustee 
in Milan township. The marriage of Mr. Black was to Miss Alice M. 
Swan, who was born and reared in Allen county, and they have two 
daughters, both of whom have received excellent educational advantages 
and both of whom have been popular and efficient teachers in the schools 
of the^'r native county. Senora, the elder daughter, is the wife of Samuel 
Spindler, of Milan township; and Josephine is the wife of Ray Irving, of 
the same township. 

Louis C. Blase is a popular and successful business man in the metrop- 
olis of his native county, where he was local representative of the Cad- 
illac Sales Company for six years, which controlled a substantial business 
from its headquarters at Fort Wayne. Mr. Blase was born in this county 
on September 5, 1881, and is a scion of a family whose name has been 
worthily identified with the history of the county for fully three-quarters 
of a century. His father, the late Louis Blase, passed virtually his entire 
life in Allen county, and the widowed mother now resides in the city 
of Chicago. Louis C. Blase is indebted to the public schools of Fort 
Wayne for his early educational discipline and is one of the loyal and 
progressive young business men of this city. He is independent in pol- 
itics, is an active member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, is affili- 
ated with the local lodge of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, 
holds membership in the Country Club and both he and his wife are 
communicants of St. Paul's Lutheran church. On January 5, 1916, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Blase to Miss Ella Beverforden, and 



68 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

they have one child, Barbara. They are popular factors in the social 
life of their home city. 

William Blessing is known as one of the most progressive and suc- 
cessful exponents of agricultural and live-stock industry in his native 
county, is a scion of a sterling pioneer family, and owns and resides upon 
the fine old homestead farm, in Section 24, Lake township, which was 
the place of his birth, the date of his nativity having been December 
14, 1861. He is a son of Peter and Catherine (Dush) Blessing, both of 
whom were born in Germany and were young at the time of the emi- 
gration of the respective families to America, the mother's parents having 
settled near Kendallville, Indiana. Peter Blessing was a sturdy and 
ambitious youth at the time when he came to the United States and 
passed the first year in the state of New York. He then came to Allen 
county, Indiana, and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. It 
is a matter of record that this honored pioneer cradled wheat on the 
ground now comprised in the beautiful suburban residence district known 
as Bloomingdale — virtually an integral part of the city of Fort 'Wayne. 
He eventually became the owner of a farm three miles north of Fort 
Wayne, but his old homestead is the place now owned and occupied by 
his son William, the immediate subject of this review. Here he estab- 
lished his residence in 1885, and by the later purchase of additional 
tracts of land became the owner of one of the large and valuable landed 
estates of the county, the home farm of William Blessing now com- 
prising one hundred and sixty acres of as finely improved and fertile 
land as is to be found in this favored section of the Hoosier common- 
wealth. Peter Blessing contributed, through his energy, ability and civic 
loyalty, much too the development and progress of Allen county, his 
was inviolable place in popular confidence and good will, and he con- 
tinued to reside on his farm until his death, which occurred August 27, 
1897, his widow surviving him by a decade and a half and having been 
venerable in years when she passed to the life eternal, on December 10, 
1912. Both were devoted communicants of the Lutheran church and 
in politics the father was a staunch Democrat. Concerning the children 
the following brief record is entered : George is a prosperous farmer of 
Lake township ; Henry is deceased ; Charles is a representative farmer 
in Washington township ; Mrs. Mary Fick is deceased ; William, of this 
review, was the next in order of birth; John likewise is a successful 
farmer of Lake township ; Elizabeth, Frederick and Otto are deceased. 
While early accorded his full meed of responsibility in connection with 
the work of the home farm, William Blessing by no means failed to 
improve the educational opportunities that were afforded in the school 
of district No. 5, Lake township. He continued to be actively associated 
with farm enterprise until he was twenty-five years of age and thereafter 
devoted eight years to work at the carpenter's trade. He then returned 
to the old homestead farm and to the same has since continued to give 
his active and effective supervision, besides which he has added mate- 
rially to the excellent improvements that had been made by his honored 
father. He erected the attractive and commodious modern house that 
is now the family home, has provided a number of minor farm buildings 
and also erected a silo of large capacity. While utilizing his land for 
well-ordered agriculture of diversified order Mr. Blessing gives special 
attention to the raising of the better types of live stock, including 
short-horn Durham cattle and Chester White swine. He is liberal and 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 69 

loyal in his civic attitude, takes lively interest in local affairs, but has 
never consented to become a candidate for public office of any kind. 
His political support is given to the Democratic party and both he and 
his wife are zealous ceJ'mmunicants of St. John's Lutheran church in their 
home township. April 25, 1907, recorded the marriage of Mr. Blessing 
to Miss Mary Anderson, who was born in Sweden, a daughter of the 
late Anders Pearson and Mary (Johnson) Ajiderson. Of the other chil- 
dren it may be recorded that Christena (Mrs. Johnson) is now a resident 
of Michigan ; Peter resides in the city of Fort Wayne, as does also Mrs. 
Hannah Rudolphson;' and Niels, John, Caroline and Carrie still remain 
in Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Blessing have three children — Hilding D., 
Douglas A. and Astrid M., and the family is one of prominence and 
popularity in the social activities of the home community. 

Maximillian J. Blitz was assigned in 1890 to the position of city ticket 
agent at Fort Wayne for the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, 
which is more commonly known as the Nickel Plate Railroad, and also 
manager of Kinner's ticket office in Fort Wayne, which office he bought 
in 1891, though he had in the meanwhile identified himself with other 
lines of enterprise, through association with which he gradually matured 
his executive powers, and in 1895 was led to establish and develop his 
present representative general insurance agency, in connection with 
which he conducts a substantial real-estate business. Mr. Blitz was born 
at Cleveland, Ohio, on the 16th of October, 1871, and is a son of Leopold 
and Sarah (Spear) Blitz, both of whom vv'^ere born and reared near the 
city of Berlin, Germany. Leopold Blitz came to America about the year 
1842 and both he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives at 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he had long been a representative merchant and 
honored and influential citizen. In the public schools of his native town 
Maximillian J. Blitz acquired his early education, which was supple- 
mented by an effective course in the Spencerian Business College at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. In 1885 he became assistant city ticket agent in Cleveland, 
Ohio, for the Nickel Plate Railroad, and after serving in this capacity 
two years he was^ advanced to the position of assistant ticket agent for 
the Detroit & Cleveland Steam Navigation Company. This incumbency 
he retained two years, at the expiration of which, in 1890, he came to 
Fort Wayne to assume the position of city ticket agent for the same 
company, with incidental management of Kinner's ticket office. In 
1895 he was appointed local agent for the Preferred Accident Insurance 
Company, of New York, and in the following year he was made district 
manager for this company for the northern half of Indiana. This expe- 
rience led to his assuming the agency for other leading insurance com- 
panies and eventuated in his developing one of the leading general insur- 
ance agencies in the city of Fort Wayne, as previously intimated. He is 
now general agent for northeastern Indiana for the Hartford Accident 
& Indemnity Company ; general agent for the Lincoln National Life 
Insurance Company, and local agent for the following named and impor- 
tant companies: The Commercial Union, of New York; the Firemen's 
Fund, of California ; the Niagara Underwriters ; the North River Standard 
Insurance Company, of Hartford, Connecticut; the Sterling Fire Insur- 
ance Company, of Indianapolis, and the Standard Live Stock Insurance 
Company, which likewise has its general offices in the capital city of 
Indiana. Mr. Blitz maintains spacious and well-appointed offices in the 
Shoaff Building and in the same gives employment to a corps of six 



70 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

efficient assistants. His business is now of broad scope and has been 
built up through careful and progressive policies and straightforward 
dealings, the same forces having been brought to bear also in connection 
with his substantial real-estate enterprise, which likewise is of a general 
order. The political proclivities of Mr. Blitz are indicated by the staunch 
allegiance which he gives to the Republican party, and both he and his 
wife hold membership in the First Presbyterian Church, of Fort Wayne. 
In the time-honored Masonic fraternity his ancient craft affiliation is with 
Wayne Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and he is further 
actively identified with the local chapter of Royal Arch Masons, the 
Fort Wayne Commandery of Knights Templars, Fort Wayne Consistory 
and also the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles. of the Mystic Shrine, 
Mizpah Temple. He is likewise an appreciative affiliant of the local lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and holds membership 
in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, the Country Club, and the local 
Press Club. He takes much interest in military affairs and was an active 
member of the Fort Wayne Rifles. April 28, 1897, was the date on which 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Blitz to Miss Edith May Barcus, 
daughter of Hezekiah and Emerilis (Bennett) Barcus, of Fort Wayne. 
Mr. and Mrs. Blitz have three children, whose names and respective 
dates of birth are here noted : John Kinner, July 4, 1899 ; Richard 
Thompson, January 16, 1902, and Edith Maxine, May 25, 1914. 

The Blue Cast Magnetic Springs. — Allen county is to be considered 
greatly favored in the prestige given by the Blue Cast Magnetic Springs 
and Sanitarium, which give to the county a reputation for the best of 
natural and properly amplified facilities for the successful treatment of 
many of the ills to which human flesh is heir. As the wonderful remedial 
powers of the waters of the Blue Cast Springs become better and more 
widely known, in the same ratio is the popularity of the fine sanitarium 
that has been provided in connection with the same to become more 
and more one of the leading health meccas of the middle west. No 
other springs in Indiana can claim waters of greater and more assured 
medicinal value than those of the Blue Cast Magnetic Springs, and to 
the splendidly equipped sanitarium are drawn each year greater numbers 
of health-seekers whose faith in the institution is virtually to be assured 
through beneficial results. In a publication of this order it is impossible 
to enter into details concerning the analysis of the Blue Cast waters or 
the manifold attractions of the sanitarium and its beautiful park, for 
all these matters are adequately described in the literature sent forth 
by the institution itself and available to all who make application for 
the same, but as the developing company has made the institution one 
of the really great health resorts of Indiana and one that contributes 
in many ways to the precedence of Allen county, it is but due that a brief 
review be incorporated in this history of the county. To accomplish this 
end most consistently the following quotations are taken from an attract- 
ive brochure issued by the Blue Cast Magnetic Springs Company : ' ' Blue 
Cast Magnetic Springs and Sanitarium are located in beautiful Blue 
Cast Park, two miles north of Woodburn, Indiana. Woodburn is on the 
main line of the Wabash Railroad, seventy-five miles from Toledo, Ohio, 
and fifteen miles from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Direct connections are, 
therefore, possible with all railroad and interurban lines running into 
these two traffic centers. Blue Cast Park is on the Maumee river, con- 
sists of eighty-five acres, half of which is a fine grove, fronting for over 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 71 

a half mile on the beautiful Maumee river. High banks, splendid scenic 
views, good boating and fishing, afford most desirable sport and recre- 
ation. Blue Cast Magnetic Springs have long been known to residents 
of the surrounding country, who have enjoyed refreshment and kept in 
health for many years by partaking of this natural tonic from the crude 
springs. Now the healthful and invigorating properties of Blue Cast 
magnetic spring water have become available for the multitudes of sick 
and ailing and those desirous of continued well being. The name Blue 
Cast is derived from the very slight bluish tint which distinguishes the 
water. Another part of the name. Magnetic, is derived from the fact 
that the water has been endowed by Nature with a peculiar magnetic 
force rarely found in any mineral water of any kind, the world over. 
Iron or steel when immersed in this water will become magnetized. This 
wonderful invigorating force is imparted to those who bathe in Blue 
Cast water, exerting a powerful tonic and metabolic influence on the 
cell life of the body. The speedy and popular endorsement of these 
curative and tonical waters is amply justified by the searching analysis 
of their properties which has been made by well-known and authoritative 
chemists. The official analysis establishes beyond a doubt that Blue 
Cast Magnetic Spring water not only possesses refreshing and exhilar- 
ating qualities, but is Nature's own remedy for many common and chronic 
ailments." The water is further attractive as a high-grade table beverage, 
and in connection with the sanitarium has provided a bottling department 
with the best modern facilities, so that the product may readily be shipped 
to all parts of the country without the slightest deterioration,. From 
an auhoritative analysis and incidental report made by a leading chemist 
are taken the following statements: "This is a very fine water for 
internal medication and is adapted to a wide range of medical uses: 
the magnesium carbonate is especially good in all stomach disorders 
and its sulphate acts mildly on the bowels, while the potassium salts aid 
all the eliminative organs and act as alteratives." Of Blue Cast Sani- 
tarium the following brief description has been given: "The building 
is a modern, fire-proof, steel and concrete structure, steam heated, electric 
lighted, with hot and cold Blue Cast Magnetic Spring water in every 
room. No expense has been spared to carry to the extreme in this sani- 
tarium all the purposes for which it has been constructed, — the comforts 
of home, rest, recreation and the renewal of the health of patients." The 
bath facilities are of the best modern type and make provision for the 
use when expedient of the wonderful magnetic mud that has been impreg- 
nated by the springs. An efficient medical staff is maintained in con- 
nection with the institution, and there are few health resorts in the 
United States that can offer greater attractions for recreation and health- 
building. For full information concerning the institution application 
should be made to the general manager, George A. Hogue, who is treas- 
urer of the Blue Cast Company and who has been the dominant force 
in the development of this splendid health resort. George A. Hogue was 
born at Akron, Summit county, Ohio, on January 17, 1875, and is a 
son of Albert and Samantha (Rollins) Hogue, both likewise natives of 
the old Buckeye state, the father having been long employed as an expert 
machinist in the old Buckeye mower and reaper works at Akron. George 
A. Hogue is indebted to the educational institutions of his native state 
for his early scholastic training, and as a youth he became associated 
with contracting work in railway construction. He initiated his activ- 



72 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

ities along this line in 1892 and eventually became an independent and 
successful contractor. He obtained and completed the contract for the 
construction of the line of the Ohio Electric Railway from Lima, Ohio, 
to Fort Wayne, and had the supervision of all construction work in that 
connection except the building of the sub-stations. Within his active 
career as a contractor he built six hundred miles of electric railway — 
principally in Ohio, Illinois and Indiana. He thus developed to the full 
his admirable initiative and administrative powers, and when, in 1912, 
he identified himself with the development and exploiting of the Blue 
Cast Magnetic Mineral Springs he came to the work splendidly equipped. 
He effected the organization of the Blue Cast Company, which purchased 
the land and erected the fine sanitarium now conducted under his direct 
and effective management, and while the company had the best of 
medium through which to justify such exploitation it has been in large 
measure due to the earnest and well-ordered efforts of Mr. Hogue that 
this fine Allen county institution has been brought before the people 
of the country and the success of the enterprise made cumulative in 
character. In politics he is a Republican, and in his civic attitude he 
is characteristically loyal,' progressive and public-spirited. In 1898 he 
wedded Miss Lua Harrison, daughter of J. B. and Carrie Harrison, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and the two children of this union are Earl Harrison 
Hogue and Bonita Goldie Hogue, the son being now a cadet student in 
Pillsbury Military Academy, in the state of Minnesota. 

William F. Borgmann. — It is signally consistent that in this volume 
be entered a tribute to the memory of the late William F. Borgmann, 
who passed his entire life in Allen county, who was a representative 
of one of the sterling families that was here founded more than half 
a century ago and whose impregnable hold upon popular confidence and 
esteem was manifested in all stages of his career, especially during the 
period of his effective service as chief of the police department of the 
city of Fort Wayne. He had become associated with his father in the 
conducting of a prosperous business in Fort Wayne, under the title of 
the Brown Trucking Company, and his untimely death was the result 
of a pitiable automobile accident in which he was so severely injured 
that he died soon afterward. He was born in Fort Wayne on August 
7, 1865, and here his death occurred on April 13, 1912. Mr. Borgmann 
was a son of William and Lesette (Brockmeyer) Borgmann, both of whom 
were natives of Germany and came to this country when young. The 
father was a boatman on the old Wabash & Erie Canal %vhen a youth 
and in later years served for a considerable time as a member of the 
Fort Wayne police force. Upon his retirement from this service he and 
his son, William F., became allied in business under the title of the 
Brown Trucking Company, and with this enterprise he continued to 
be identified until his death, which occurred in 1908. William F. was 
the second of a family of five children, all of whom were born and 
reared in Fort Wayne. He was but fourteen years old when, after 
having attended school, he began to give his father valuable assistance 
in the latter 's trucking business, and they became very successful along 
this line, both having been connected with the same until their death. 
Like his father, William F. Borgmann made a splendid record of faithful 
and efficient service in the Fort Wayne police department. In 1890 
he became a patrolman and not only won promotion in turn to the offices 
of sergeant and captain but also proved so unmistakably his ability and 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 73 

good judgment that he was finally chosen chief of police. His admin- 
istration in this important office was most effective and popularly satis- 
factory, and he continued the incumbent of the post until 1910, when 
he resigned. In 1898 he had become associated with his father in pur- 
chasing an interest in the business under the title of the Brown Trucking 
Company, and after his retirement from the municipal service gave his 
attention to this business until his demise. Mr. Borgmann was a most 
stalwart and loyal advocate and supporter of the cause of the Demo- 
cratic party and was a consistent communicant of Trinity Lutheran 
church, earnest in his support of church work and active in the affairs 
of the parish, of which his widow continues an active communicant. 
On July 4, 1886, he was united in marriage with Miss Anna Hunche, 
a native of Lima, Ohio, and a daughter of Henry F. and Anna (Reber) 
Hunche, both natives of Germany. Henry F. Hunche was born and 
reared in Germany and came to the United States in 1861. He died, 
in 1911, his wife having passed away in 1891. Mrs. Borgmann remains 
a resident of Fort Wayne and maintains the attractive homestead at 
420 Fourth street. In the community her circle of friends are legion 
an entertain for her the warmest regard. In conclusion is entered 
brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Borgmann : Edith 
is the wife of Paul Charle, of Fort Wayne, and they have three children — 
John (deceased), William and Virginia. Walter A., who is now his 
father's successor as president and general manager of the Brown Truck- 
ing Company, wedded Miss Pauline Doenges, of Fort Wayne, and they 
have one son, William W., born May 18, 1913. Irene is the wife of John 
C. Marshall, of Fort Wayne, and they have two children — Stephen M., 
born March 24, 1911, and Helen, born January 19, 1913. 

Ellas H. Bookwalter. — Allen county is favored in having drafted 
well-qualified officials to direct the various departments of its govern- 
ment, and he whose name introduces this article gave a short but effective 
service in the office of county recorder, to which position he was elected 
in the autumn of 1916, his assumption of his official duties having 
occurred on the 1st of the following January. His incumbency of the 
position was only for the period of three months, as he died on April 
4, 1917, mourned by a large circle of friends. Elias Hubbard Book- 
waiter was born in Wabash county, Indiana, May 9, 1854, a son of Josiah 
and Elizabeth (Riley) Bookwalter, the former of whom was born at 
Eaton, Preble county, Ohio, on April 1, 1827, a date that denotes that 
his parents were pioneers of that section of the Buckeye State. Josiah 
Bookwalter was reared and educated in Ohio and, in 1850, came to 
Indiana and engaged in farming in Wabash county, where he also oper- 
ated a blacksmith shop. In the autumn of 1866 he came with his family 
to Allen county and thereafter continued to be engaged in farming in 
St. Joseph township, until 1870, when he removed to Fort Wayne and 
became a traveling representative for the Keeler Dental Company. In 
1885 he retired from active business life and now resides in the city 
of Indianapolis, April 1, 1917, marking his attainment of the patriarchal 
age of ninety years. He is a Republican in politics, having been affiliated 
with the party during practically the entire period of its existence; he 
has long been identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
and the passing years have found him a consistent and devoted member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife likewise was an earnest 
member of this religious denomination, her birth having occurred at 



74 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Baltimore, Maryland. Josiah Bookwalter is to be given honorable 
mention as one of the most venerable of the surviving veterans of the 
Civil "War, in which he served as a valiant member of Company E, One 
Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana Infantry, he having won in the same 
promotion from private to the office of corporal. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. Of the children the eldest is John A., 
residing at Indianapolis; Elias H., of this review, was the next in order 
of birth ; Charles A. is one of the influential citizens of Indianapolis and 
has served as mayor of the capital city ; Lucinda is the widow of Newton 
Cook and resides in Seattle, Washington; and James E. is a resident of 
Halstead, Harvey county, Kansas. Elias H. Bookwalter gained his rudi- 
mentary education in the schools of Wabash county and was about 
twelve years old at the time of the family removal to Allen county, 
where he was afforded the advantages of the city schools of Fort Wayne. 
As a youth he entered the service of the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette 
and with this representative newspaper continued to be associated for 
twenty-eight and one-half years, after which he rounded out his alliance 
with practical journalism by continuing his connection with the Fort 
Wayne Sentinel for eighteen and one-half years — or until he assumed 
the office of county recorder. His broad and varied experience in con- 
nection with newspaper business brought to him extensive and accurate 
knowledge concerning Allen county and its people, and this information 
proved a fortifying influence in making his administration as county 
recorder specially efficient and commendable. Mr. Bookwalter was never 
deflected from the course of loyal allegiance to the Republican party 
and he gave active service in behalf of its cause. He was affiliated with 
James B. White Camp No. 152, Sons of Veterans, and Harmony Lodge 
No. 19, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In September, 1874, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bookwalter to Miss Catherine Perrin, 
daughter of the late James and Keziah (McWhorter) Perrin, of Bourbon, 
Marshall county, Indiana, and the only child of this union was Clyde 
R., who passed his entire life in Fort Wayne and was forty years of 
age at the time of his death, November 22, 1915. He was married, in 
1897, to Stella A. Botzum, of Akron, Ohio, and they have one child, 
Velma R. Clyde R. Bookwalter was owner of the Fort Wayne Tea & 
Coffee House and was prominent in fraternal circles. 

Rev. John H. Bosch. — The Reformed church in Indiana claims as one 
of its able, vigorous and zealous clergymen the Rev. John H. Bosch, who 
has served with utmost fidelity and efficiency as pastor of St. John's 
Reformed church, of Fort Wayne, since 1895, and whose earnest efforts 
have done much to forward the spiritual and temporal interests of this 
old and important parish, the church edifice of which is situated on 
Washington Boulevard, west. Mr. Bosch was born in the picturesque 
Rhein Province of Germany, September 8, 1867, and is a son of Henry 
and Sibilla (Peschken) Bosch, the father having been a prosperous 
farmer in that favored section of the German empire. He whose name 
introduces this review found the period of his childhood and early 
youth compassed by the conditions and influences of the home farm, 
and his early educational discipline was received in the Lutheran paro- 
chial schools of his native province. At the age of twenty years he 
came to the United States and shortly afterward entered Calvin College, 
in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, where he prepared himself for matric- 
ulation in Heidelberg Theological Seminary, at Tiffin, Ohio. In this 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 75 

latter institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1894, 
and prior to this had gone to Chautauqua. New York, where he pursued 
the special study of the Hebrew language under the private preceptor- 
ship of the late and revered Rev. William H. Harper, D. D., who later 
became president of the great University of Chicago. This effective 
special course enabled him to complete in two years the prescribed 
three years' curriculum of the Heidelberg Theological Seminary, and 
it has been a matter of enduring satisfaction to him that he was thus 
able to know and receive instruction from Doctor Harper, one of the 
greatest educators and university executives that America has known. 
On January 13, 1895, Mr. Bosch was ordained a clergyman of the Re- 
formed church and was duly installed pastor of his present parish, 
this result having been achieved through the action of "a committee 
of the Zion's classis of the Synod of the Northwest of the Reformed 
Church of the United States," and Rev. John Kuelling having been 
chairman of the ordaining and installing committee. Within the earnest 
and vigorous pastorate of the present incumbent the parish of St. John's 
Reformed church, of Fort Wayne, has expended more than thirty thou- 
sand dollars in the improving of the church property, and all of this 
appreciable amount has been paid in full, so that the parish is free 
from indebtedness. In 1916 was erected a new and modern parsonage, 
at a cost of eleven thousand dollars. The church has six hundred and 
seventy-five communicants, implying a congregation of fully one thou- 
sand persons. In addition to his zealous pastoral and executive duties 
Mr. Bosch was for twelve years editor and publisher of a periodical 
known as Gemeinde Bote, published in the German language. The paper 
was discontinued, in 1915, but in 1917 it was re-established and is now 
published in the English language. St. John's Reformed church, of 
Fort Wayne, was organized, in 1844, by fourteen families as constituent 
members, and concerning the growth and development of the historic 
old parish adequate mention is made in the general church history 
appearing in this publication. The church is identified with the South- 
western Synod, and the assembly of this synod, for 1917, was held in 
Fort Wayne. St. John's church has the largest congregation of all 
individual parishes in the synods of either .the Southwest or Northwest, 
and the former synod has been entertained by the historic Fort Wayne 
church on three different occasions, prior to 1917. Mr. Bosch was for 
twelve years a member of the board of directors of the Orphans' Home, 
besides being treasurer of the noble institution, for which he handled in 
this period funds to the amount of -more than one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars. At the present time Mr. Bosch is a member of the 
board of trustees of the Central Publishing House of the Reformed 
Church of the United States, and he is vice-president of the board, this 
publishing house being established in the city of Cleveland. Mr. Bosch 
is a Republican in politics and is known as a broad-gauged, progressive 
and public-spirited citizen who takes deep interest in civic and govern- 
mental affairs, though he has had no desire to take an active part in 
political maneuvers. He is a devotee of Outdoor sports and while in 
college gained championship honors in tennis. He takes lively interest 
in base ball, basket-ball, foot ball and all manner of athletics, and he 
and his wife enjoy to the full the boating, fishing and general pleasures 
incidental to their annual summer vacations in Northern Michigan, be- 
sides which he has indulged in various hunting trips in which he has 



76 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

brought down deer and other large game. In 1899 was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Bosch to Miss Frances R. Schweds, daughter of Rev. F. 
R. Schweds, D. D., who was pastor of St. John's Reformed church, of 
Fort Wayne, from 1868 to 1873, and under whose direction the present 
fine church edifice was erected. Mrs. Bosch was born in the old parson- 
age of this church and prior to her marriage had been a successful and 
popular teacher of German in the high school of the city of Terre Haute, 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Bosch have three children — Aurelia, Paul and 
Theodore. 

John Bostick passed his entire life in Fort Wayne, was a scion of 
one of the well-known and honored pioneer families of Allen county, 
and by his character and achievement he reflected dignity upon his native 
city, where he was long and prominently concerned with business affairs 
and where he won success through well-directed endeavors. A man of 
fine attributes of character and genial and kindly disposition, he com- 
manded the high regard of all who knew him and thus set at naught 
any application of the scriptural aphorism that ' ' a prophet is not without 
honor save in his own country." Mr. Bostick was born in Fort Wayne 
June 26, 1847, and here his death occurred two weeks prior to his fifty- 
fourth birthday anniversary. He was a son of Emanuel and Harriet 
(Kline) Bostick, who came from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and estab- 
lished their home in Allen county fully three-fourths of a century ago 
and who passed the residue of their lives in Fort Wayne, where the 
father built up a prosperous merchant tailoring business. The third 
in order of birth in a family of nine children, the subject of this memoir 
acquired his early education in the public schools of Fort Wajme, and he 
learned the tailor's trade under the effective direction of his father, by 
whom he was eventually admitted to partnership and after whose death 
he continued independently to carry on the successful merchant tailoring 
business until about 1883, when he engaged in the real estate business. 
Of this latter and important phase of productive enterprise he continued 
to be a' prominent and successful exponent until the close of his life, 
and incidentally he did much to further the normal development and 
upbuilding of his native city, which he had seen grow from a village to 
a civic and commercial center of metropolitan status. He accumulated an 
appreciable amount of valuable realty in Fort Wayne and vicinity, and 
of the same his widow still retains a considerable part, her beautiful 
home, at 426 East Wayne street, being known for its hospitality as a 
center of representative social activities. Mr. Bostick was a loyal advo- 
cate and supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, was actively 
affiliated with the time-honored Masonic fraternity and was a zealous 
communicant of the English Lutheran church, as is also his widow. He 
passed from the stage of his mortal endeavors on June 12, 1901, in the 
very prime of his strong and useful manhood and with an unsullied record 
as a man of sterling character and as a citizen of high ideals. On Sep- 
tember 1, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bostick to Miss 
Louisa Deppeler, who likewise was born and reared in Fort Wayne 
and whose parents, John and Elizabeth (Weyseit) Deppeler, both natives 
of the fair little republic of Switzerland, established their home in Fort 
Wayne many years ago. Mr. Deppeler became one of the representative 
merchants of this city and was one of the honored and influential citizens 
of Allen county, both he and his wife having continued their residence 
in Fort Wayne until their death. Mr. and Mrs. Bostick became the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 77 

parents of four children, all of whom are living except the first born, 
Edward, who died at the age of three years and three months. The 
three surviving sons, Samuel W., John D. and William E., are actively 
concerned with business affairs in Fort Wayne and the two first men- 
tioned still remain with their widowed mother, 

Delbert D. Boston, who is giving effective and loyal service as town- 
ship trustee of his native township and is engaged in the barber business 
at Harlan, was born in Springfield township on August 18, 1866, a son 
of Thomas and Lavina (Snyder) Boston, both natives of the state of 
Ohio. Thomas Boston was born and reared in Stark county, Ohio, a 
representative of a sterling pioneer family of that section of the Buckeye 
State, and was a young man when he came to Allen county, Indiana, 
and numbered himself among the pioneer exponents of agricultural in- 
dustry in Springfield township, where his marriage was solemnized and 
he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, he having been for 
many years one of the substantial citizens and representative farmers 
of the township. He was a Republican in his political proclivities and 
both he and his wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mary Ellen, the first of their five children, is deceased, and 
the survivors are : Myra, Elizabeth, David and Delbert D. He whose 
name initiates this article was reared to the sturdy discipline of the 
home farm and in the meanwhile profited by the advantages afforded 
in the schools of his native township. He continued his association with 
agricultural enterprise until he was twenty years of age, when he 
learned the barber's trade, to which he has since devoted his attention. 
With the exception of two years passed at Findlay, Ohio, he has been 
engaged in the work of his trade at Harlan during the intervening years, 
and here he has a well-equipped shop of modern appointments and the 
best of sanitary provisions, so that his trade is of representative and 
appreciative order. Mr. Boston is unflagging in his allegiance to the 
Republican party and in his loyalty to his native township and county. 
He was elected trustee of Springfield township in November, 1914, and 
is now the efficient and progressive incumbent of this office. He is 
affiliated with Harlan Lodge No. 296, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, 
he and his wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in their home community their circle of friends is limited only by 
that of their acquaintances. On November 6, 1889, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Boston to Miss Ella Furney, who was born and reared 
in this county and is a daughter of Jeremiah and Isabell (Cummings) 
Furney. Mr. and Mrs. Boston have two children— Beryl, who is the 
wife of DeGroff N. Swartz, a prosperous farmer of Springfield township ; 
and Donald M., who remains at the parental home. 

Daniel Bottenberg, who died March 12, 1917, and who was one of 
the venerable and revered citizens of Monroe township, is specially 
entitled to recognition in this history of Allen county, within whose 
borders he maintained his home from his boyhood and in which he was 
a representative of a sterling pioneer family. Though he later retired 
from the arduous labors that long engrossed his time and attention, he 
continued to reside upon and give a general supervision to his fine farm, 
which comprises one hundred and sixty acres and which is eligibly situ- 
ated in Section 22, Monroe township. Mr. Bottenberg was born in Butler 
county, Ohio, April 19, 1835, and was one of the members of a family of 
twelve children, only three of whom now survive. He was a son of 



78 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Jacob and Nancy (VanHorn) Bottenberg, the former of whom was born 
in Maryland of German lineage, and the latter in New Jersey, of staunch 
Holland Dutch ancestry. The parents removed to Ohio in the early 
'30s and in 1849 they came with their children from Butler county, that 
state, to Allen county, Indiana, where the father obtained a tract of 
heavily timbered land, in Marion township, and there he began the 
reclaiming of a farm under the primitive conditions that marked the 
pioneer era in the history of the county. His earnest and strenuous 
efforts brought to him independence and he and his wife lived to see 
their pioneer log house give place to a more modern and pretentious 
building. They continued to reside on their farm until he moved to 
Monmouth and there he died in 1869. Their names merit a place on the 
roster of the honored pioneers of Allen county. He whose name intro- 
duces this review gained his rudimentary education in the common schools 
of the old Buckeye state and was a lad of about fifteen years at the time 
of the family removal to Indiana. He assisted his father in the her- 
culean work of reclaiming the old homestead farm and remained at the 
parental home until he had attained to his legal majority, with a due 
quota of incidental discipline that tended to broaden his mental horizon. 
After leaving the home of his parents he farmed rented land for a number 
of years, and he then purchased his present homestead, which he devel- 
oped into one of the well-improved and valuable rural estates of Monroe 
township. As a loyal and liberal citizen he aided in the support of those 
things that advanced the general welfare of the community and he gave 
unfaltering allegiance to the Republican party, though he had at no 
time any desire for public office of any kind. Both he and his wife 
were zealous members of the Lutheran church in their community and 
he served the same in the offices of trustee and elder at the time of his 
death. Through his own well-ordered efforts Mr. Bottenberg made his 
way to the goal of worthy prosperity and enjoyed the rewards of former 
years of earnest toil and endeavor, the while both he and his wife rested 
secure in the high regard of all who knew them. In 1857 was recorded 
the marriage of Mr. Bottenberg to Miss Elizabeth Lenhart, who was 
born in Ohio and who is one of the four surviving members of a family 
of twelve children. Her parents, John and Rebecca (Burroughs) Len- 
hart, were born, respectively, in the states of Pennsylvania and Maryland, 
and the father was twelve years of age when he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Ohio, where he was reared to adult age. In 1839 
John Lenhart removed from Ohio to Adams county, Indiana, where he 
settled on an embryonic farm in the midst of the almost unbroken forest 
and there he reclaimed a productive farm. The original family dwelling 
was a pioneer log house with clapboard roof weighted down with poles, 
with puncheon floor and wide fireplace as interior provisions, and with 
door fitted with the old-time latch string that was always left hanging 
on the outside, as an evidence of the hospitality of the little domicile in 
which dwelt contentment and happiness. The parents of Mrs. Bottenberg 
remained on this old homestead until their death. Concerning the five 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Bottenberg the following brief record is given 
in conclusion of this sketch : Jason remains with his mother and has 
the active management of the old home farm ; John P. is the second son 
and is engaged in farming in this county; Nellie is the wife of Henry 
Bowers; Mary L. is the wife of William C. Foster, and they now reside 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 79 

in the state of Michigan; and Zenus J., the youngest of the children, 
resides in Monroe township. 

Oscar Boulton is one of the native sons of Allen county who has 
brought to bear a strong and well-poised mentality as well as significant 
enterprise and progressiveness in the furthering of his successful activ- 
ities as an agriculturist and stock-grower, and he is now one of the 
representative exponents of these fundamental industries in his native 
township of Springfield, where he has made the best of improvements 
upon his fine farm of one hundred and eighty-five acres, in Sections 
27 and 28, the homestead being about one and a half miles distant 
from the village of Grabill, which is his postoffice address. Mr. Boulton 
was born in Springfield township, February 2, 1862, a scion of a sterling 
family that was founded in this county full seventy years ago. He is 
a son of Henry and Helen (Hatch) Boulton. Henry Boulton was born 
in England and was fifteen years of age when he came to America with 
his parents, the home being established in Erie county, Ohio, where 
he was reared to manhood and whence he came to Allen county, Indiana, 
in 1847. He purchased a tract of land in Springfield township and 
from the virgin forest reclaimed a pro luctive farm. There he continued 
his residence until he had attained to advanced age, when he retired 
from active labors and established his home in the village of Harlan, 
where both he and his wife passed the residue of their lives in gracious 
peace and prosperity and with secure place in the esteem of all who 
knew them. Louisa, the eldest of their children, is deceased, and all 
of the others are living, namely : Nettie, Emma, Mary, Flora, Oscar, 
Ida and Minnie, the subject of this review being the only son. Oscar 
Boulton was reared to the sturdy and invigorating discipline of the 
home farm and his alert and vigorous mentality prompted in him such 
ambition that he was not content with the advancement made by avail- 
ing himself of the advantages of the public schools, but furthered his 
academic knowledge by attending for one term the normal department 
of what is now the great Valparaiso University. That he made good 
use of the opportunities thus afforded him is evidenced by the effective 
service which he gave as a representative of the pedagogic profession. 
For eight years he was in active service as a successful and popular 
teacher in the public schools of his native county and thereafter turned 
his attention with equal earnestness and circumspection to farm enter- 
prise, in which he has achieved unequivocal success, his present fine 
farm of one hundred and eighty-five acres giving definite evidence of 
thrift and prosperity. In 1917 he purchased a residence in the village 
of Harlan, where he contemplates making his future home. Mr. Boulton 
is found aligned as a well-fortified advocate of the principles of the 
Republican party and takes loyal interest in community affairs, though 
he has manifested naught of ambition for the honors or emoluments of 
public office. He attends and supports the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Grabill, of which his wife is an active member. On April 24, 1890, 
was recorded the marriage of Mr. Boulton to Miss Isa Burchfield, who 
likewise was born and reared in this county, a daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (Safford) Burchfield. Mr. and Mrs. Boulton have no children 
of their own, but in their home they are carefully rearing an adopted 
daughter, Julia Hamilton, who accords to them true filial affection. 

Jesse W. Bowers, M. D., has fortified himself with that resolute 
integrity of purpose and that thorough technical preparation which make 



80 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

for unequivocal success in the medical profession, and he is recognized 
as one of the able and representative physicians and surgeons of the 
younger generation in the city of Fort Wayne, where he has been estab- 
lished in the general practice of his profession since the summer of 1908 
and where his success is on a parity with his unqualified personal popular- 
ity. Doctor Bowers was born at Van Wert, Ohio, October 15, 1882, and 
is a son of George W. and Annie E. (Webb) Bowers, Avho still reside in 
that attractive little city of the Buckeye state, the father having been 
for a number of years identified with railroad operations, later having 
become an exponent of agricultural industry and being now successfully 
established as an apiarist at Van Wert, as an enthusiast and authority 
in bee culture and the producing of the finest grade of honey. Doctor , 
Bowers is indebted to the public schools of his native city for his early 
educational training, which was supplemented by a course in the Western 
Ohio Normal School, at ]\Iiddlepoint, as well as by a thorough course 
in the Ohio Northern University, at Ada, in which he took a scientific 
course, as a member of the class of 1901. In preparation for his chosen 
profession he entered the Eclectic Medical College in the city of Cin- 
cinnati, this being one of the foremost schools of the Eclectic system 
in the Union, and in the same he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1908 and with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He gained val- 
uable experience by serving as an interne in Seton Hospital, Cincinnati, 
prior to his graduation, and on June 3, 1908, he established his residence 
in Fort Wayne, where his close application and effective service have 
resulted in his building up a substantial practice. The Doctor is a 
member of the State Medical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, has attained the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite and the York Rite of the Masonic fraternity, besides being 
affiliated also with the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
the Tribe of Ben Hur and the Modern Woodmen of America. On Decem- 
ber 20, 1903, was recorded the marriage of Doctor Bowers to Miss Alby 
Beck, daughter of Daniel and Margaret (Rank) Beck, of Van Wert, Ohio, 
and the two children of this union are : Gab. w^ho was born May 20, 
1905, and Feme, who was born January 9, 1908, 

William E. Bowers. — One of the progressive and prosperous younger 
men of New Haven, resident there since 1903, is William E. Bowers, pro- 
prietor of the New Haven Tribune and since 1905 manager of the 
New Haven Telephone Company. Mr. Bowers was born in Jefferson 
township, Allen county, Indiana, on February 24, 1874, and is the son 
of David B. and Lucinda (Lesh) Bowers. The father was born in Mans- 
field, Ohio, and the mother in Lewisville, Ohio. Mr. Bowers was a farmer, 
coming with his parents to Allen county in 1848, where they bought a 
farm, locating in Jefferson tow^nship. He later purchased the original 
tract and also added thereto, carrying on active farming operations until 
1911, when he retired and moved to Fort Wayne. He died April 9, 1917. 
Mrs. Bowers died on the home farm in 1906. She and her husband were 
members of the Methodist Protestant church and were active workers 
in the church in the years of their residence in Jefferson township. Their 
children were seven in number. Alfaretta is the wife of J. F. Hathaway, 
of Fort Wayne. William E., of this review, was the second born. Harry 
H. lives in Dayton, Ohio. John E. is a resident of Washington, D. C. 
Glenola is the wife of Earl Schnitz, of Fort Wayne. Arthur died in 
infancy and Frances died at the age of seventeen years. William B. 



PORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 81 

Bowers had his education in the schools of Jefferson township, the New 
Haven and Fort Wayne public schools and the Ohio Normal University 
at Ada, Ohio, where he took a scientific course. His education finished, 
he engaged in teaching and for three years was employed in the schools 
of Jefferson township. He then spent one year in the Marion (Ind.) 
Law School, after which he taught in the Marion schools for three years 
and in 1903 came to New Haven and bought the Tribune, which he 
published successfully until January 1, 1917, when he leased the paper 
to C. F. Moon. In 1905 he became manager of the Home Telephone Com- 
pany, of New Haven, and he is now serving as president of the North- 
eastern Indiana Telephone Association. Mr. Bowers is a Republican in 
politics, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and of the New 
Haven Commercial Club, one of the live organizations of the town. His 
fraternal relations are confined to identification with the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He was married on January 15, 1902, to Miss Pearl 
Allen, the daughter of Hiram and Amanda (Lancaster) Allen, of Marion, 
Indiana. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowers — Arthur 
and Jeannette, now attending school in their home town. 

W. J. Bowker. — See Athenaeum, 

Allen A. Bowser is first vice-president of the. corporation of S. P. 
Bowser and Company, manufacturers of oil tanks and pumps and one 
of the most important manufacturing and commercial enterprises of Port 
Wayne. He is a nephew of the sterling and representative citizen whose 
name gives title to this well-known concern. Mr. Bowser was born in 
DeKalb county, Indiana, on February 19, 1865, and is a son of Alexander 
and Laurinda (DeVilbiss) Bowser, the former of whom was born in 
Allen county, the latter in the state of Ohio. The father, a representative 
of one of the honored pioneer families of this section of Indiana, who 
is now living retired in Port Wayne, followed the carpenters' trade for 
a long period and developed a substantial business as a contractor and 
builder. Later he and his son Allen, together with Sylvanus h\ Bowser, 
commenced the business in which he continued until his retirement a 
few years ago. Allen A. Bowser was a child at the time of the family 
removal to Port Wayne, where he acquired his early education in the 
public schools. At sixteen years of age he began working with his father 
in the carpenter business and at twenty years they started the making 
of pumps in a barn at the rear of their home. Since this time Mr. Bowser 
has been an invaluable aid in the extensive industrial enterprise con- 
ducted under the incorporated title of S. P. Bowser and Company. His 
inventive genius has produced many of the ideas of intrinsic value to 
this company. As first vice-president of this concern he has become an 
influential figure with secure status as a captain of industry in Port 
Wayne. Loyal and progressive in his civic attitude, he is aligned as a 
stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. In 1892 he 
married Miss Lottie Pierson, who was born and reared in Allen county 
and who served her community and church nobly until her death in 
November, 1916. Mr. Bowser himself has served the United Brethren 
church in many substantial ways, including the superintending of the 
Sunday school for the past twenty-six years. An only child, Jennie L. 
Bowser, resides with her father in their beautiful home on East Pontiac 
Street. 

Albert S. Bowser. — Of the younger business men of Fort Wayne, 
Albert S. Bowser is a most fitting representative. Of unostentatious de- 



82 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

meanor, never given to spectacular or pretentious display, Mr. Bowser, 
in his capacity as secretary of S. F. Bowser & Company and as the 
manager of the Michigan district in the sales organization of the company, 
has risen to the best opportunities of his connection with the enterprise 
founded by his father, S. F. Bowser. He has been actively connected with 
practically every department of the home office of the concern and is 
thoroughly acquainted with the details of the immense organization. 
Mr. Bowser was born in Fort Wayne July 28, 1886, the son of Sylvanus 
and Sarah F. (Russell) Bowser. A biographical review of S. F. Bowser 
appears elsewhere in this volume. Albert S. Bowser was educated in 
the public schools of Fort Wayne, and, following his period in the high 
school, he entered actively upon his business career with S. F. Bowser 
& Company, in December, 1906. On the 12th of September, 1907, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Ida Pearl Kickley, of Fort Wayne. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowser — Bon Silene and Albert 
S., Jr. Mr. Bowser is a member of the Masonic fraternity, including 
the Mystic Shrine, and actively connected with the Friars Club and the 
Country Club. His election to the presidency of the Senate Club in 1917 
placed him at the head of one of the live organizations of the younger 
business and professional men of the city, an honor which bespeaks his 
popularity among his associates. Mr. and Mrs. Bowser are active mem- 
bers of Plymouth Congregational church. 

Sylvanus F. Bowser is a striking example of the stalwart manhood 
of the middle west — an illustration of the attainment of true success 
through the application of sterling principles of action. As the head of 
one of the most widely famed manufacturing institutions of America — 
one with distribution centers in the capitals of Europe as well as in the 
chief cities of the United States — his name is known and spoken wherever 
commercial oils are sold or used. The hundreds of salesmen who tell 
of the superior merits of the self-measuring oil storage devices manu- 
factured by S. F. Bowser & Company, Inc., not only give a service 
of untold worth to millions of purchasers but they also spread abroad 
the good name of Fort Wayne to every quarter of the civilized world. 
Mr. Bowser is a man of enthusiasm, far-sightedness and of unbounded 
energy and capacity for thought and work. With high ideals of his duty 
toward his fellow men, he has built solidly upon the foundation of real 
success. His fraternal spirit is reflected throughout the organization of 
the office, the factory and the sales force. Mr. Bowser is a native of 
Allen county, of which Fort Wayne is the seat of government. He was 
born in Perry township August 8, 1854, and is a son of John H. and 
Eliza (Keiger) Bowser, both of whom were born and reared in Penn- 
sylvania, where their marriage was solemnized. They became the par- 
ents of thirteen children, of whom six are deceased. John H. Bowser 
removed from Pennsylvania to Perry tov/nship, Allen county, Indiana, 
in 1833, and here he developed a valuable farm in the midst of the virgin 
forests. Here he and his wife resided until the close of their days. Syl- 
vanus F. Bowser was reared on the home farm and attended the common 
schools. In 1882 he became a traveling salesman for the wholesale paper 
house of W. H. Wells and Brother, of Chicago. It was in 1885, while 
he was still employed by the Wells concern, that there came to him the 
idea of the self-measuring oil pump which was an entirely new device, 
the first of its kind and which was destined to revolutionize the oil 
handling business of the world. From the time the first pump was made, 



\ 



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^>:- 




\ 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 83 

Mr. Bowser, through the organization of the company after he had thor- 
oughly tested his invention, has constantly overcome all difficulties, until 
to-day the company's managers are recognized the world over as oil 
storage and handling experts, producing devices for the small user as 
well as those demanded by the largest and most complete factory or 
railroad plant. At the time of his discovery Mr. Bowser — as we find 
by referring to his own story of the business — had been compelled to 
refrain from hard manual labor, an account of a physical breakdown, 
and at this time on account of financial difficulties, he deeded his home 
to a creditor and engaged for his family small living quarters consistent 
with his meager means. The story of his struggle against ill health and 
threatened want, coupled with the courage and energy of the future 
manufacturer, is one of inspiration and hopefulness to every youth into 
whose life it may come. Referring to the day when things began to 
take on a new significance, Mr. Bowser says in his little booklet, entitled 
"A Dream and a Reality": "It was one morning in the early spring 
of 1885 that I was going out on a five o'clock train, in pursuit of my 
business as a salesman. Therefore, I arose at four o'clock, and, among 
other things, I wanted to leave my wife with a good supply of water 
for the day. The well from which we got our water was about seventy 
feet deep, and our means for getting it were somewhat primitive, not- 
withstanding the same is in use now, here and there through the country, 
and doubtless forever will be. Over the well was built a little house 
and up in the roof was a big, grooved swivel-wheel over which the long 
well rope passed so that a bucket could be made fast to each end of it. 
By letting one bucket down for water, you at the same time would be 
drawing up the other bucket full of water. The little house over the well 
was unusually high. It simply had a roof on it and was not enclosed 
and the well being deep and the night still and very cold, the steam 
that came out of the well froze on the ropes thus exposed between the 
mouth of the well and the roof. Therefore, in order to draw water in 
this manner, this frozen, frost-covered rope had to pass through my 
hands, and it being a very cold morning, its sting was added to my hands. 
I took my grip and made the train. I went to Decatur, twenty-two miles 
south of Fort Wayne ; here I got a team of horses and a sleigh and drove 
to Pleasant Mills, some six miles southeast. From there I drove to Will- 
shire, Ohio, three and one-half miles farther on. It was on this drive 
from Pleasant Mills to Willshire that my mind turned to the unpleas- 
antness of drawing water out of this deep well on a cold morning. My 
thoughts turned to devising some better way, at which time I saw, as 
it were, a pump cylinder at the bottom of the well sufficiently large to 
hold a pail of water, the same being provided with a discharge pipe 
and a pump rod, similar to our present pump, and so arranged that with 
one full stroke I could discharge a bucketful of water. This looked 
good to me, and I thought if it was good and practical, maybe I could 
work up a little business out of it by manufacturing it for the market. 
Upon returning home I took it up with my brother, who was an engineer 
on the Pennsylvania Railroad and lived the second door from me, drawing 
water from the same well. Neither of us being versed in this kind of 
business, but my brother having an acquaintanceship with a patent- 
model maker who was quite well versed in mechanics of this sort, we 
went down and laid the matter before him. He took out of his drawer 
a little book which treated of subjects of this kind and showed us 



84 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

therein the great pressure that would be necessary to raise the water 
to the surface from so deep a well, which convinced us that it was abso- 
lutely impractical. This settled it, for the moment at least, but when 
I got out alone and was thinking the matter over, it came to me in almost 
audible words : 'Why will it not do for oil? It is never far away.' And 
as this was going through my mind I could see, as it were, an oil tank 
sitting in the corner of a grocery and I could see another oil tank sitting 
beneath, in the corner of the basement of the grocery, and as basements 
are never very deep I felt sure that my pump would work satisfactorily 
in either of these tanks. So, in a few days, when my brother was in, 
I took this proposition up with him. He readily agreed with me that 
in this case the pump would work entirely satisfactorily, but he sug- 
gested that everybody was supplied with oil tanks and there would be 
no market for them. But as my business was selling goods, I did not 
see it in that way." The narrative goes on to tell of the inventor's 
securing five orders within the following two days, for his pump, which 
was as yet a dream. None of these orders were filled until three months 
later, but from that time forward the Bowser pump grew in popular 
favor until, as in the case of the year 1916, the sales of S. F. Bowser 
and Company totaled the splendid sum of six and one-half million dollars. 
The total number of office and factory employes is about 1,200, while 
the sales force has an aggregate of 550 men scattered over the civilized 
world. "A volume coulu be written of the dark and trying times before 
the idea came to me," says Mr. Bowser, "and two volumes could be 
written of the times since ; but you will observe that had it not been 
for these trying times and misfortunes, of which I have had many, 
together with my broken health, I would not have lost my home, I would 
still be a traveling man and there would have been no 'Bowser pump' 
to-day." Mr. Bowser has been active for many years in every great 
movement for the advancement of his fellow men. Daily he is called 
upon to give his means and his voice to the improvement of the welfare 
of the people of his own and other communities. Although he is a leader 
in the conduct of the affairs of the First Baptist Church, his benevolences 
are widespread. In polities he is a supporter of the principles of the 
Republican party. On October 11, 1876, Mr. Bowser was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sarah F. Russell, who likewise was born and reared 
in Allen county and who is a daughter of William and Sarah Russell, 
residents of Fort Wayne at the time of their death. Mr. and Mrs. Bow- 
ser became the parents of six children, as follows : Harry M., Eva C. 
(now Mrs. Leland F. Johnson), William Hugh (an invalid), Albert S., 
Ethelyn V. (now Mrs. Daniel G. Milligan) and Mildred L. Bowser. In 
honor of an invalid son, Mr. and Mrs. Bowser have erected a beautiful 
place of worship for the Free Methodist denomination, and the same 
is known as the Hughie Bowser church, the edifice standing near the 
extensive plant of S. F. Bowser & Company, 

Edward B. Boyle has been engaged in business in Hoagland for the 
past eighteen years and has enjoyed a fair measure of success in that 
time. Prior to his connection with his present enterprises he was iden- 
tified with the farming industry, in which he was reared on the home 
farm of his parents, who were Daniel and Elizabeth (Minick) Boyle, 
natives of Ireland. They came from their native land in the year 1832, 
settled in Huntington county, and Mr. Boyle found work on the old canal. 
After some time spent in that work he had saved enough to make pos- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 85 

sible the purchase of eighty acres of government land, and from then 
until his death he was successfully engaged in agriculture in Huntington 
county. He was a Democrat, a member of the Roman Catholic church, 
and he died at the age of fifty-six years, leaving four children. Ellen 
married John Tooley and is deceased, John Patrick was the second 
born. Edward is the immediate subject of this review, and Mary died 
in Chicago as the wife of "William Thomas. Edward Boyle was educated 
in the parochial schools at Hesse Cassel, and up to the age of sixteen 
years spent much of the time with his uncle in that place. He later 
branched out for himself and up to the age of thirty-two was connected 
with farming and kindred occupations. In 1899 he engaged in the saloon 
business in Hoagland, where he has since been successfully established. 
He is a director in the Hoagland State Bank and is fraternally identified 
by his membership in the Independent Order of Eagles. A Democrat, 
he has been influential in local politics, and is a member of the Catholic 
church at Hoagland. He was married on November 5, 1904, to Mary 
Schmidt, and they have two children — Robert Patrick and Eugene 
Charles. 

Conrad Branning merits recognition in this history by reason of his 
status as one of the loyal and popular citizens and substantial farmers 
of Aboite township, where he is the owner of a well-improved farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres and where his success has been consonant 
with the energy and good judgment he has brought to bear in the various 
departments of his farm enterprise. He was born in Germany, on Sep- 
tember 9, 1855, and is a son of Henry and Minnie Branning, who came 
with their family of nine children to America in the year 1881, their 
arrival in the port of New York city having been on June 22 of that 
year. They came forthwith to Indiana and after residing for a time in 
the vicinity of the city of Vincennes they came to Allen county, where 
they passed the remainder of their lives, the father having been an 
industrious and successful farmer. Conrad Branning acquired in his 
native land his early educational training and there also he learned the 
mason's trade. He was about twenty-five years of age when he accom- 
panied his parents on their immigration to the United States and for 
many years he continued to follow the work of his trade, first at Vin- 
cennes and later in Fort Wayne. He finally sold his business at Fort 
Wayne, where he had become a successful contractor, and in 1896 pur- 
chased eighty acres of his present homestead farm, the additional eighty 
acres having been secured at a later date. He has shown his energy 
and progressiveness in the improving and management of his farm, which 
is devoted to diversified agriculture and stock-growing and which gives 
definite evidence of thrift and prosperity. He takes loyal interest in 
public affairs of a local order and is a staunch Democrat in politics, he 
and his family being earnest members of the German Lutheran church. 
On October 10, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Branning to 
Miss Sophia Dammeyer, whose parents passed their entire lives in Ger- 
many. Only a few months after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Branning 
came to America, and they have been devoted companions and co-workers 
during the years that have brought to them a generous measure of inde- 
pendence and prosperity. Of their children the first born was Minnie, 
who died in infancy. The second child likewise was given the name of 
Minnie, and she is now the wife of Lemuel McKenzie. William, the third 
child, is deceased. Sophia remains at the parental home. Edmund and 



86 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Esther are twins and both are married and well established in life, 
Edmund having one son, William, and Esther, who is the wife of M. B. 
Marshall, having two children, Conrad and Catherine. Henry and Louise, 
the next two of the children, are deceased ; and those who remain members 
of the parental home circle are Ferdinand, Charles, Fritz, Mary, Theodore 
and Irene. 

Charles W. Branstrator was born in Lafayette township on the old 
William Branstrator place, settled by William Branstrator as long ago 
as in 1848. He was the father of the subject and he was long and prom- 
inently identified with that district, witnessing its development along 
many lines, and being a contributor to its worthiest advancement. He 
came from Warren county, Ohio, where the family had long been estab- 
lished in farming activities. William Branstrator married Catherine A. 
Hill, also of Ohio birth and parentage, and they were the parents of a 
family of twelve children. Frances E. died on April 13, 1913. Sarah B. 
is the wife of Henry Cress. Martin Luther died in infancy. Andrew 
Dallas lives in Fort Wayne. Anna Catherine married George Welbaum. 
William David is living in Warren county, Ohio, the old family home. 
Jason D. is a resident of Wayne township. James Calvin died in infancy. 
George B. Mc. is a resident of Fort Wayne. Charles W. is the subject. 
Rosa Jane and Delia May are deceased. The parents were members of 
the Unitarian church. Mr. Branstrator was a Mason and was long 
prominent in his community in a political way, serving as a trustee of 
the township in the early years after its official formation. He died 
May 1, 1900, and his wife April 13, 1913. Charles W. Branstrator had 
better educational advantages than the average farm youth. He fol- 
lowed his high school training with a course in the Fort Wayne College, 
thereafter spending two years in the University at Valparaiso, where 
he took a scientific course of study that included engineering. After 
finishing his university course he taught school from 1890 to 1892, in 
the latter year being elected to the office of County Surveyor of Allen 
county and serving as County Survej'^or for three consecutive terms. After 
his term of service he surveyed the Wabash Railroad line from Fort 
Wayne to Butler, and later spent six months in Oklahoma on an engi- 
neering work. Still later he spent some months in Fort Wayne as an 
engineer and in 1900 came to the home farm. He returned to Fort 
Wayne, however, but in 1904 once more came back to the old farm, and 
he may be found there at the present writing, where he has made a 
name for himself as a feeder of sheep, cattle and hogs. He has been 
very successful in his stock-farming and feels satisfied that he has found 
his rightful place in life. Mr. Branstrator is a Mason and a Democrat. 
He was married on April 14, 1895, to Miss Eda Kimmell, daughter of 
Jacob and Louisa (Fisher) Kimmell, the father a native of Pleasant 
township and the mother born in New York city. They were farmers 
in Pleasant township for many years, and both are now deceased. They 
had two children — Eda, wife of the subject, and Thomas, who is con- 
nected with the electric light plant in Fort Wayne. Nine children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Branstrator, here briefly named in the order of 
their appearance. Grace K. is a student at Valparaiso University. Helen 
is at home with the family. Charles is attending the high school in Fort 
Wayne. The others are Clover Hill, Clara, Mabel, Ann, Sarah Jane 
and Martha W. All are at home. 



1 



iC Li 



ASTOJ<, LEic 
TILDEN FOUNCfi', 



■i 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 87 

Mrs. Anna Brauneisen is a life-long resident of Indiana and has made 
her home in Fort "Wayne since 1884, when she and her husband opened 
a grocery store and identified themselves with the community life. When 
in later years the health of the husband failed Mrs. Brauneisen assumed 
responsibility for the success of the enterprise and continued to operate 
it with much success until 1910, when she sold the business and turned 
her attention exclusively to china painting, which had long been a hobby 
with her, and which has claimed her attention since then both profitably 
and pleasureably. She has an ever increasing patronage in Fort Wayne 
and vicinity, and besides executing orders for the work, she conducts 
classes in the art of china painting and is generally regarded as an 
expert along those lines. Her study of ceramics has been a far-reaching 
one, and it is a subject that claims a large share of her 
attention, though she has been able to devote some time to real estate 
operations along very successful lines. She has built and sold two fine 
residence properties in the city, and is now the owner of a third at No. 
2014 Webster Street. She also owns a store building at No. 1602 Wells 
Street, and some other property in the city. Mr. and Mrs. Brauneisen 
had one son — a brilliant youth who gave promise of imusual accomplish- 
ments in music. He died suddenly at the age of sixteen, just as he was 
graduated from a local business college. Mrs. Brauneisen is a member 
of the Roman Catholic church and is devoted to the work of the parish, 
though the demands her profession make upon her time prevent her from 
participating to any extent in the social activities of those circles in 
which she is known and esteemed. 

William P. Breen. — Fort Wayne and Allen county are grateful for 
the influence of the citizenship of a man of the type of William P. Breen, 
one of the most widely known members of the Indiana bar. Mr. Breen 
was born in Terre Haute, Vigo county, Indiana, February 13, 1859, the 
son of James and Margaret (Dunne) Breen, both natives of Ireland, born 
in 1820 and 1821, respectively. In 1840, the father at the age of twenty, 
severed the ties which had bound him to the Emerald Isle and came to 
America. After a brief residence in the east, he came west and settled 
at Terre Haute, where he remained until 1863, in which year the family 
removed to Fort Wayne. Mr. Breen not only attained to prominence 
as one of Fort Wayne's representative business men, engaged in mer- 
cantile lines, but he interested himself with marked effect in civic affairs. 
For a number of years, he served as a member of the city council, and, 
at the time of his death, was a member of the board of waterworks 
trustees. This was in 1883. William P. Breen was the only child of 
James Breen and his wife. He attended the parochial school conducted 
by the Brothers of the Holy Cross, and followed this with a course in 
Notre Dame University, from which institution he was graduated in 1877, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Upon his return to Fort Wayne, 
Mr. Breen entered upon a course in the study of law in the offices of 
Coombs, Morris & Bell, and, in 1879, was admitted to the bar of Indiana. 
At this time, Mr. Breen was but twenty years of age. From the beginning 
of his career in the law until November 15, 1882, the time of the death 
of Judge Warren H. Withers, Mr. Breen was associated with Judge 
Withers in a most successful practice of his profession, and then, for a 
period of eleven years, he continued an individual practice of increasing 
importance, until, in 1893, he formed a co-partnership with John Morris, 
Jr., son of Judge John Morris, The latter was one of the foremost jurists 



88 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of his time; his death occurred in 1905. The firm of Breen & Morris, 
which has continued since its formation, is recognized as one of the 
most influential in the state of Indiana. The enviable position of Mr. 
Breen among his fellow-members of the Indiana bar is suggested in his 
election as president of the Indiana Bar Association for the years 1903 
and 1904, as a member of the executive committee of the American Bar 
Association from 1903 to 1906, and as a delegate to the Universal Con- 
gress of Lawyers and Jurists, in 1904, at St. Louis, under the appointment 
of President Roosevelt, Republican. Although always a vigorous advo- 
cate of Democratic principles, Mr. Breen has never sought political 
honors. His activities have been recognized in his selection as a delegate 
to the National Democratic Convention at St. Louis, in 1916, and a 
member of the committee to visit President Woodrow Wilson at Shadow 
Lawn, New Jersey, in September, 1916, to give him official notification 
of the action of the convention. Mr. Breen 's keen power of thinking, 
his readiness of speech and his popular method of treating questions of 
wide importance has given him a place of prominence among the public 
speakers of Indiana. His opinions and his influence are ever sought by 
those who feel deeply the need of the co-operation of a man whose word 
finds weight with the many who seek the truth along many lines of 
endeavor. On May 28, 1884, Mr. Breen was united in marriage with 
Miss Odelia Phillips, daughter of Bernard P. and Caroline (Vogel) Phil- 
lips, of Fort Wayne. Mr. Breen is the president of one of the city's 
substantial financial institutions, the People's Trust and Savings Com- 
pany, of Fort Wayne, which occupies its own modern six-story building, 
centrally located. He is a member of the Catholic Club, of New York. 
He is a member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and of the Fort 
Wayne Country Club. Every movement for the substantial betterment 
of the community finds a stanch advocate in Mr. Breen. No member of 
the bar has conferred greater honor or distinction upon the profession in 
Allen county and the state of Indiana. Admittedly a man of resources, 
he is recognized among the men of his profession as one who is a close 
student of every element which comes into every case presented for his 
consideration — quick to recognize and to anticipate difficulties and to 
overcome them — forceful in the presentation of his arguments — he has 
gained and held the respect and admiration of all who have in any way 
been connected with the activities of his professional or private life. 

James J. Brennan has been identified with railway affairs since his 
early youth and his activities have touched both steam and electrical 
transportation, in the latter department of which he has achieved dis- 
tinctive success and precedence, as evidenced by the fact that he is at 
the present time superintendent of transportation for the entire system 
of the Fort Wayne and Northern Indiana Traction Company, which con- 
trols and operates about 230 miles of traction service, in Indiana. He 
maintains his residence and official headquarters in the city of Fort 
Wayne and as one of the representative business men of the metropolis 
of Allen county he is specially entitled to recognition in this history. 
Mr. Brennan was born in the historic old town of Harper's Ferry, West 
Virginia, on July 8, 1870, and is a son of Martin and Catherine (McCabe) 
Brennan, who were residents of West Virginia at the time of their deaths, 
both having been born in Ireland. Martin Brennan was a youth when 
he came to the United States, in 1847, and he first established his residence 
at Charlestown, West Virginia, whence he later removed to Harper's 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 89 

Ferry. During the major part of his active career he was closely iden- 
tified with railroad operations and through his industry and well-ordered 
efforts he won independence and a fair measure of temporal prosperity, 
both he and his wife having been zealous communicants of the Catholic 
church. Of their children, Elizabeth still resides at Harper's Ferry; 
James J., of this review, was the next in order of birth; John resides 
at Harper's Ferry, and William E. maintains his home at Harrisonburg, 
Virginia. In his native place James J. Brennan attended school until 
he was fourteen years of age, when he there entered the employ of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. He won advancement until he 
became identified with the train service of this company, and later he 
was similarly engaged at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the employ of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Compan}'. Later he became identified with 
the operation of an electric railway at Wheeling, West Virginia, and there- 
after his activities in this same direction involved his service in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and Detroit, Michigan. In 1905 he came to Fort Wayne and 
assumed the position of superintendent of overhead construction for the 
Fort Wayne and Northern Indiana Traction Company, and his ability 
and efliective service eventually led to his promotion to his present 
responsible post, that of superintendent of transportation for the entire 
local and interurban system of this corporation. He has proved one of 
the world's workers and his advancement represents the result of his 
ability, ambition and well-ordered endeavors. In politics Mr. Brennan 
maintains an independent attitude, he is affiliated with the Knights of 
Columbus, and both he and his wife are active communicants of the 
Catholic church. On May 21, 1892, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Brennan to Miss Bessie Winston, of Wheeling, West Virginia, and of 
their five children the first two, Cyril and Mary Agnes, are deceased; 
William Edward is a student in the great University of Michigan, at 
Ann Arbor, as is also Joseph F. ; and Thomas James remains at the 
parental home. 

August Brenneke was a young man of twenty-eight years when he 
established his home in this county, in 1884, soon after his arrival in 
America. When he severed the ties that bound him to his native land he 
came to this country with no definite financial resources and dependent 
upon his own ability and efforts in making his way to the goal of inde- 
pendence and prosperity. That success has attended him generously 
within more than thirty years of residence in Allen county is vouched 
for not only by his influential association with the banking business at 
Woodburn, but also by his ownership of one of the valuable estates of 
Maumee township. Mr. Brenneke was born in Germany January 13, 
1856, and is a son of Frederick and Caroline (Neward) Brenneke, who 
passed their entire lives in Germany, the father having been a farmer by 
vocation. In the excellent schools of his native land August Brenneke 
received his early educational discipline and there also gained his initial 
experience in connection with practical farm industry. In 1884 he came 
to the United States and established his permanent residence in Allen 
county. Here he bought a tract of cut-over land in Maumee township, 
and he reclaimed, drained and otherwise improved this property, which 
is now one of the fine farms of the county. With increasing financial 
means, Mr. Brenneke continued to make judicious investments in farm 
land, and he is now the owner of a finely improved estate of two hundred 
and fifty acres, divided into two farms, each of which is improved with 



90 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

modern buildings and kept up to the highest standard in all respects. 
Mr. Brenneke has been a man of assertive and self-reliant ambition and 
enterprise, has ordered his course on a high plane of integrity and honor 
and has achieved large and well-merited success through his own well- 
applied energy as a progressive agriculturist and stock-grower. His 
political support is given to the Republican party, he has served as trustee 
of Maumee township, and he and his wife are earnest communicants of 
the Lutheran church. In 1889 Mr. Brenneke wedded Miss Sophia Feusse, 
daughter of Henry and Margaret Feusse, of Adams county, Indiana, and 
this gracious union has been blessed with three children : Henry is suc- 
cessfully established in the mercantile business at "Woodburn, and Herman 
and William are, respectively, managers of two of their father's fine 
farms in Maumee township. 

William Breuer. — As the American republic stands to-day pre-emi- 
nent among nations in its capacity for the conducting of commercial and 
industrial affairs of great scope, so does the splendid enterprise of the 
Berghoff Brewing Company, of Fort Wayne, stand as a conspicuous 
example of the truth of the above statement, even as it does also of the 
great value of our German element of citizenship. The history of this 
representative Fort Wayne concern covers a period of more than thirty 
years, its business has been at all times conducted with scrupulous integ- 
rity both in the matter of maintaining the high standard of production 
and in the honorable methods employed in all trade transactions. The 
result has been the upbuilding of a business that far transcends local 
limitations and that marks the Berghoff Brewing Company as 6ne of 
the leading institutions of its kind in the Union, the capacity of its 
extensive and finely equipped plant being tested in supplying the demands 
of a trade that extends into divers states of the Union and that has made 
the Berghoff beer famed in such metropolitan centers as the city of 
Chicago. Of this company William Breuer is vice-president, and prior 
to giving a brief review of his career it is but consistent that there be 
entered a resume of the history of the important corporation of which 
he is thus a valued executive. In the year 1885 the Herman Berghoff 
Brewing Company was incorporated with a capital stock of one hundred 
thousand dollars and with Herman Berghoff as president and Hubert 
Berghoff as secretary and treasurer, the original plant of the company 
having been established at the corner of Washington Avenue East and 
Grant Street. The original principals were insistent in bringing the 
output of the brewery up to the highest German standard, and this policy 
has been maintained during the long intervening years, so that the 
Berghoff name now implies the maximum of purity, of proper maturing 
of all products and of a standard from which there have been all too 
many lapses in the record of American manufacturing of malt bever- 
ages. In 1899 a reorganization of the concern was effected under the 
title of the Berghoff Brewing Company, and the capitalization was in- 
creased to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars of common stock and 
an equal amount of preferred stock. At this juncture the officers of 
the company became as here noted : Herman Berghoff, president ; Hubert 
Berghoff, vice-president ; Stephen B. Fleming, secretary and treasurer, 
and William Breuer, superintendent. Three years later each the common 
and preferred stock was doubled, and at the present time the common 
stock is represented in the noteworthy sum of seven hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars, with preferred stock of equal amount. The personnel 



PUBLIC LFer' 



TltDJEN FOUN-DATION 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 91 

of the executive corps at the opening of the year 1917 is as here recorded : 
Gustave A. Berghoff, president; William Breuer, vice-president; Stephen 
B. Fleming, treasurer, and Martin C. Norton, secretary. All of these 
officers are likewise directors of the company, and the directorate includes 
also Charles Weatherhogg and G. R. Johnston. All of the directors are 
residents of Fort Wayne with the exception of Mr. Fleming, who now 
maintains his home in New York city, and Mr. Johnston, who resides 
in the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The plant of this great brewery 
utilizes about one and one-half city blocks, the average annual output 
is one hundred and eighty thousand barrels of beer and the bottling 
department turns out an average of one hundred and twenty thousand 
bottles daily. The company represents not only one of the most important 
industrial enterprises of Fort Wayne, but is also given the distinction 
of being the most extensive shipper on the line of the Nickel Plate 
Railroad. William Breuer was born in Westphalen, Germany, on October 
23, 1852, and is a son of Carl Ludwig and Catherine (Helle) Breuer. 
He was reared and educated in his native province and as a youth served 
a thorough apprenticeship to the brewer's trade, under the unexcelled 
German system, his apprenticeship having been initiated May 16, 1866, 
several months prior to his fourteenth birthday anniversary. In 1881 
he came to the United States, and after passing about three months in 
the city of Rochester, New York, he came to the west and found employ- 
ment at his trade in the city of Chicago, where he remained about nine 
months. He then went to Neillsville, the judicial center of Clark county, 
Wisconsin, where he held a responsible position in a brewery for two 
years. He then established a brewery at Boscobel, Grant county, that 
state, where he remained until 1885, when he came to Fort Wayne and 
assumed the position of superintendent of the plant of the Herman Berg- 
hoff Brewing Company, in the development of whose splendid business 
he has been an influential and valued factor, the while he has gained 
secure place as one of the representative captains of industry in the 
metropolis of Allen county, prior data in this review having sufficiently 
indicated his advancement in the control and management of the affairs 
of the Berghoff Brewing Company. In politics Mr. Breuer gives un- 
wavering allegiance to the Republican party, he is actively identified 
with the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, of which he is a trustee, and 
he is serving as a member of the board of park commissioners of his 
home city, besides which he is a trustee of Concordia College, one of 
the important educational institutions of northern Indiana. Both he and 
his wife are communicants of the German Lutheran church. On Novem- 
ber 23, 1884, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Breuer to Miss Caroline 
Rodewald, a native of Germany, and they have four children : William, 
who is actively associated with business affairs in Fort Wayne; Amelia, 
who is the wife of Kurt Johns, of Newark, New Jersey, and Delia and 
Louise, who remain at the parental home. 

Eugene H. Briggs, who exercises important functions in the position 
of executive assistant in the offices of the great manufacturing estab- 
lishment of S. F. Bowser & Company, one of the leading industrial 
concerns of Fort Wayne, is a scion of stanch old colonial stock in New 
England, on both the paternal and distaff sides. He was born in the city 
of Boston, Massachusetts, on July 15, 1874, and is a son of Rev. Lewis L. 
and Mary T. (Howarth) Briggs, the former a native of Providence, Rhode 
Island, and the latter of Dover, New Hampshire. The father, a man 



92 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of high intellectual attainments and mnch oratorical ability, served many- 
years as a clergyman of the Universalist church, his death having occurred 
in 1893, and his widow survived him by a score of years, she having 
been summoned to eternal rest in 1913. Of the three children Irene C. 
is the wife of Thomas G. Rees, of Boston, Massachusetts; Lewis H. died 
in infancy, and the subject of this review is the youngest of the number. 
Eugene H. Briggs attended the public schools at Lynn, Massachusetts, 
and he initiated his business career by assuming a clerical position in 
a banking institution in the city of Boston, in 1895. He continued his 
association with banking enterprises until 1910, and in the meanwhile 
his ability and effective service gained to him consecutive promotion. 
In the year last mentioned he became factory salesman in New England 
for the important firm of S. F. Bowser & Company, and in 1913 he came 
to Fort Wayne, where he now holds the responsible post of executive 
assistant in the offices of this important concern. Mr. Briggs is found 
aligned as a loyal advocate of the cause of the Republican party, and 
at Wakefield, Massachusetts, he still maintains affiliations with Golden 
Rule Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. On October 1, 1900, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Briggs to Miss May Katherine 
Wyman, who likewise was born in the city of Boston, and they have two 
children — Lewis L. and Norma H. 

Stillman B. Brokaw has held since the autumn of 1916 a position 
with the municipal waterworks department of Fort Wayne and takes 
loyal interest in all things pertaining to the welfare and advancement 
of his native city. He was born in Fort Wayne and is one of the three 
surviving children of the late Samuel L. Brokaw, who was born at 
Galena, Ohio, April 20, 1840, and died in Fort Wayne on April 28, 1907. 
As a young man Samuel L. Brokaw served as a member of Company K, 
One Hundred and Eighth Ohio Infantry, with which he served four 
years, or virtually during the entire period of the great civil conflict 
through which the integrity of the Union was preserved. He was dis- 
charged shortly before the close of the war, as the result of physical 
disability, and his record was that of a loyal and valiant young soldier 
of the Union, In 1867 he established his home in Fort Wayne, where 
he passed the remainder of his life. He was engaged in railroad work 
during the major portion of the long intervening years and the last ten 
years of his life were marked by his efficient service as county health 
officer, in which position he made an admirable record. His widow still 
resides in Fort Wayne, and with her remain her tAvo daughters, Estella 0. 
and Irene Sinex Brokaw, who, with Stillman B., subject of this review, 
are the only survivors in a family of nine children. Stillman B. Brokaw 
was educated in the public schools of Fort Wayne and while yet in his 
'teens entered the employ of Albert Tomkinson, who was here engaged 
in the plumbing business. His work in this connection was so well per- 
formed that he won advancement and eventually became an indispen- 
sable factor in the business, with which he continued to be associated 
until he assumed his present municipal position. On May 18, 1910, Mr. 
Brokaw married Miss Mary E. Tomkinson, a daughter of his employer, 
Albert Tomkinson, and the one child of this union is Herbert James 
Brokaw. Mr. Brokaw is a Republican in his political allegiance and is 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. The attractive family home is at 
411 Kinnaird Avenue. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 93 

Frank I. Brown is a recognized authority in connection with the 
grades and valuations of lumber and holds the responsible position of 
lumber agent for all lines of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company of the 
divisions and branches west of the city of Pittsburgh. He has maintained 
his home in Fort Wayne for nearly forty years and is one of the well- 
known and representative citizens of the Allen county metropolis. Mr. 
Brown was born at South Orange, New Jersey, on June 20, 1856, and is 
a son of John S. and Adelaide (Freeman) Brown, of whose seven children 
he is the youngest. The parents were born and reared in New Jersey, 
with whose history the family names have been identified for many gen- 
erations, and the father was one of the successful farmers of that state, 
within whose borders he and his wife continued to reside until their 
deaths. Frank I. Brown received the advantages of the public schools 
of New Jersey and also those of the Newark Military Academy, in the 
metropolis of his native state. As a youth he was concerned with mer- 
cantile business in Newark, and in 1880, as a young man of twenty-four 
years, he came to Fort Wayne and entered the employ of the firm of 
Hoffman Brothers, for whom he acted as lumber inspector. With this 
concern he continued his effective services nearly seven years, and he 
then accepted a position as lumber agent for the Pittsburgh, Chicago 
& St. Louis Railroad, commonly known as the Nickel Plate. With this 
company he continued his association in this capacity for twelve years 
and in January, 1900, he severed this connection to assume his present 
and similar office in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 
His official duties cause him to travel extensively, and he is familiar 
with lumber resources and conditions in the various sections of the 
Union. Though never a seeker of public office of any kind, Mr. Brown 
is aligned as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Republican party, 
and in his home county he is an active and appreciative member of the 
Fort Wayne Country Club. He is also vice-president of the United 
States Field Trial Club, of Grand Junction, Tennessee, and is well known 
as a breeder of English setters. Mr. Brown frequently is called to officiate 
as judge at the Grand Circuit Field trials. On January 15, 1896, was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Anna Bond, of Fort Wayne, no children 
having been born of their union. 

Martin C. Bruick. — The Bruick family, represented in St. Joseph 
township by Martin C, of this review, had its establishment in America 
in the year 1834, when his parents — Morris Bruick and Martha Cue — 
aged nine and seven years, respectively, came with their parents and 
settled in Adams township. There the young people were reared in 
the wilderness and, growing up as neighbors and lifelong acquaintances, 
their marriage followed quite as a matter of course. They settled in 
the community where they had been reared, became worthy contributors 
to the industrial life of the township, and were the parents of a family 
of eight children. They were John, Adam, Anna, Elizabeth, Martin, 
Henry, William and Jacob, all living at the present writing. The parents 
are now deceased — his passing being in the year 1887 and hers in 1892. 
Martin Bruick had a common school training in Adams township and 
early turned his attention to farming, in which he has since been occupied 
successfully. He is the owner of one hundred and fifty-four acres in 
St. Joseph township, on which he may be said to have made all the 
improvements. He married, in 1892, Sophia Goeglein, daughter of George 
Goeglein, concerning whom more extended mention will be found on 



94 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

other pages of this work. Seven children have come to Mr. and Mrs. 
Bruick— Hulda, Liiella, Arthur, Amiel, George, Arnold and Carl. The 
family have membership in the German Lutheran church, and Mr. Bruick 
is a Democrat in politics. 

George H. Buck has been engaged in the fish business in Fort Wayne 
since 1890 and has built up through effective service a substantial and 
representative trade, his well-equipped establishment being situated at 
720 Harrison street. Mr. Buck was born in the city of Indianapolis, 
Indiana, July 29, 1861, a son of Charles W. and Louisa (Durfee) Buck, 
natives of the state of New York and both now deceased, the father 
having been a railroad man during the greater part of his active life 
and he and his wife having been residents of Fort Wayne at the time 
of their death. Of their children the eldest is Lucy, who is the wife 
of Cyrus Crabbs, of Indianapolis, and the subject of this review was 
the second in order of birth; Mary is the wife of James Doudrick, of 
Kansas City, Missouri; Ada is the wife of Frank Cornish, a contractor 
in Fort Wayne; Edward is a locomotive engineer and now resides in 
the state of California. He whose name initiates this paragraph acquired 
his youthful education in the public schools of Indianapolis and Fort 
Wayne and thereafter was identified with railway service until he estab- 
lished his present business enterprise, in the conducting of which he 
has shown the care, discrimination and progressiveness that invariably 
make for success worthy of the name. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in the time-honored Masonic 
fraternity he has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accept- 
ed Scottish Rite, besides having completed the circuit of the York Rite, 
in which his maximum affiliation is with Fort Wayne Commandery of 
Knights Templars. He is identified also with the Mystic Shrine and 
the Knights of the Maccabees, and is an active and popular member 
of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club. The maiden name of the first 
wife of Mr. Buck was Ella J. Baughman, and she is survived by two 
daughters— Grace, who is the wife of John flengstler, of Fort Wayne, 
and Maude, who is the wife of Walter Kruse, of this city. The second 
marriage of Mr. Buck was solemnized in 1901, when Miss S. Ellen Uran 
became his wife. She was born in Michigan and is a daughter of John 
and Ola (Hayes) Uran. Mr. and Mrs. Buck have one son, George H., Jr. 

Ernest F. Bueker, who has been one of the energetic and successful 
representatives of farm industry in Aboite township, came from Ger- 
many to America in 1870, when a youth of about sixteen years, and estab- 
lished his home in Fort Wayne within a short time after his arrival in 
the United States, In character and ambition he proved himself well 
equipped for the achieving of success through personal endeavor and 
for the long period of twenty-two years was engaged in the work of 
his trade, that of plasterer. Through this medium he gained the financial 
resources that eventually enabled him to purchase his present farm of 
eighty acres, where he has erected good buildings and made such other 
improvements as denote significantly the spirit of thrift and enterprise. 
As an agriculturist and stock-grower Mr. Bueker won substantial success 
and still owns his valuable farm property, though he is now living 
virtually retired in Fort Wayne, where he has a pleasant home at 1923 
Hanna street. Loyal to and appreciative of American institutions, Mr. 
Bueker gives stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party 
and takes lively interest in public affairs of a local order. He is affili- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 95 

ated with the Masonic fraternity and also with the St. John's Reformed 
church in Fort Wayne, as was also his wife, who died May 24, 1917. 
Mr. Bueker was born in Westphalia, Germany, on May 15, 1854, a son 
of Frederick and Sophia (Buller) Bueker, who came to the United 
States, in 1871, and settled in Fort Wayne, their son Ernest, of this 
review, having preceded them to this city by about one year. Here 
the father engaged in the work of his trade, that of cooper, and here 
his death occurred in 1886, his devoted wife having been summoned 
to the life eternal, in 1882, and both having been zealous communicants 
of the Reformed church. Of their children the eldest is Frederick, who 
is a retired farmer living in Fort Wayne ; Frederica is the wife of 
Christian Tschannen, a farmer in Aboite township; Caroline and Lottie 
are deceased ; Lizetta is the widow of Henry Hilgeman, deceased ; Ernest 
F., of this sketch, was the next in order of birth ; and Henry is deceased. 
Ernest F. Bueker acquired his early education in the excellent schools 
of his native land and was an ambitious and self-reliant young man 
when he severed the ties that bound him to the fatherland and came 
to the United States, due record having already been given concerning 
his career since that period. October 3, 1878, recorded his marriage to 
Miss Lizetta Hildebrand, who was born in Fort Wayne, January 15, 
1857, a daughter of William and Marie (Hencheon) Hildebrand, 
both now deceased. Mr. Hildebrand was for a number of years identified 
with various lines of business enterprise in the city of Indianapolis 
and finally removed to Fort Wayne, where he and his wife passed the 
remainder of their lives. In conclusion is given brief record concerning 
the children of Mr. and Mrs. Bueker: Minnie is the wife of Charles 
Stillborn, of Fort Wayne, and they have two children — Irma and Elmer. 
Carl, who likewise resides in Fort Wayne, married Miss Minnie Goette, 
and they have four children — Mildred, Minerva, Nellie and Melba. Edwin 
resides in Fort Wayne, the maiden name of his wife was Jenette Presler 
and they have two children — Freda and Kathryn. William, who has 
charge of the old home farm in Aboite township, wedded Miss Ella 
Nicholson, and they have one son, William Aaron. Ernest is engaged 
in farming in Whitley county. Freda is employed as a skilled stenog- 
rapher in the offices of the S. F. Bowser Company, Fort Wayne, and 
remains at the parental home. Bertha also makes her home with her 
father. Matilda is the wife of Edwin Beard, of St. Joseph township. 

Frederick J. Bueker is one of the representative farmers of the 
younger generation in his native township of Washington, and his 
homestead, comprising one hundred and ten acres, has been bj'^ 
him greatly improved since it came into his possession, so that 
it is consistently to be designated as one of the model farms of 
Washington township. He was born in this township March 19, 
1879, a son of Frederick W. and Frederica (Oslag) Bueker, both of 
whom were born in Prussia and were young folk at the time when they 
came to the United States. The first husband of Mrs. Bueker was William 
Kolmartin and they became the parents of three children — William, 
Sophia and Henry J. — of whom only the last mentioned is living, he being 
one of the successful farmers of Washington township. Mr. Kolmartin 
died, in 1876, and on February 7, 1877, his widow became the wife of 
Frederick W. Bueker, the subject of this review being the eldest of the 
three children of this union ; Edward resides on the old homestead farm 
of his father, and Mrs. Eliza Most is now a resident of the city of Bujffalo, 



96 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

New York. Frederick W. Bueker became one of the substantial ex- 
ponents of agricultural industry in Washington township and upon his 
retirement from active labors removed to the city of Fort Wayne, where 
he and his wife still maintain their home. He whose name initiates this 
article gained his early education in the public and the Lutheran pa- 
rochial schools of his native township and as a lad of thirteen years began 
to render effective aid in the work of the home farm, with the manage- 
ment of which he continued to be associated until he initiated his inde- 
pendent activities as an agriculturist and stock-grower. He purchased 
his present farm in 1910 and has brought the same under a high state of 
cultivation, the place being devoted to well ordered agriculture of diversi- 
fied order. Mr. Bueker erected on his farm the present commodious and 
attractive residence and also the barn and other farm buildings of minor 
order, ndustry and progressiveness have brought to him merited pros- 
perity and he is one of the substantial and popular citizens of his native 
township, his political allegiance being given to th eRepublican party 
and both he and his wife being active communicants of St. John's Re- 
formed Lutheran church in the city of Fort Wayne, from which their 
home is about three miles distant, on rural mail route No. 1. On June 27, 
1909, Mr. Bueker wedded Miss Sophia Ungerer, who was born and reared 
in this county, a daughter of George and Magdalena (Hammerbacher) 
Ungerer, both natives of Bavaria, Germany, their marriage having been 
solemnized in Allen county about the year 1870. The father is now 
living retir din Fort Wayne, where he was for a number of years suc- 
cessfully engaged in the contracting business, and his devoted wife passed 
to the life eternal, March 28, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Bueker have four chil- 
dren — Carl, Florence, Doris and John. 

John Buell has been a resident of Allen county since he was twenty- 
seven years of age, is now one of the progressive and representative 
farmers of Aboite township, and his success as one of the world's pro- 
ductive workers has been of unequivocal and meritorious order. He 
is a citizen who can claim the historic Old Dominion state as the place 
of his nativity, and he is a scion of one of its old and honored families. 
Mr. Buell was born on a farm in Rockingham county, Virginia, July 22, 
1857, and is a son of William C. and Hannah (Canup) Buell, both of 
whom passed their entire lives in Virginia, where the father was a rep- 
resentative of agricultural industry during his entire active career. He 
was long known as one of the most active and influential advocates of 
the cause of the Republican party in his county and he served two terms 
as deputy sheriff of Rockingham county. Of his children the eldest was 
Milton, who served as a soldier in the Civil War, at the age of eighteen 
years, and who supposedly sacrificed his life in battle, as the other mem- 
bers of the family lost all trace of him within a short time after he had 
gone to the front; the second child died in infancy and the third was 
John, subject of this review; Maria became the wife of John Fleming 
and continued to reside in Virginia until her death; Miss Catherine still 
maintains her home in Virginia, as does also William, who is a prosperous 
farmer in Rockingham county; and Sarah Jane likewise remains in the 
old home state and county. John Buell passed his boyhood days under 
the turbulent conditions that prevailed in Virginia during the period 
of and subsequently to the Civil War, and his early education was gained 
mainly in the old-time subscription schools of his native commonwealth. 
He continued to assist his father in the operations of the home farm 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 97 

until he had attained to the age of twenty-three years, when he came to 
the north. He first went to Ohio, where he was employed one year. 
He was twenty-seven years old when he came to Fort Wayne, Indiana, and 
here he obtained employment as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad. He was thus engaged three years, and later was em- 
ployed by the month at farm work. For one year he worked in a meat 
market in Fort Wayne, a similar period was given to service as motorman 
on the street-car lines of the city, and he next worked a year in a black- 
smith shop. After his marriage he rented from his father-in-law a farm 
and continued his operations under these conditions for twelve years. 
He then purchased forty-six acres in Aboite township, and to the same 
he has since added until he now has a fine farm of one hundred and sixty- 
one acres, the same being devoted to well-ordered agriculture and the 
raising of good livestock. Mr. Buell erected the present modern and 
attractive house on his homestead, has provided other excellent farm 
buildings, and is known as one of the vigorous and progressive exponents 
of farm enterprise in Aboite township. Taking loyal interest in com- 
munity affairs, he has had no desire for public office, but he is found 
aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. On 
the 4th of March, 1891, Mr. Buell wedded Miss Ida F. Clark, wlio was 
born and reared in this county and who is a daughter of Enoch and 
Anna (Shippey) Clark, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Clark 
came from Maryland to Allen county and became one of the successful 
farmers and stock-growers of this section of the state, besides having 
given much effective service as a veterinary surgeon. Of the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Buell the eldest is Chauncey, who is a skilled mechanic 
and is employed as such in Fort Wayne; Grace holds a position in a 
hospital in Fort Wayne ; Paul is, in 1917, attending business college in 
that city; the fourth child, a son, died in infancy; and Oliver is the 
youngest member of the home circle. 

Henry F. Busching. — One of the substantial and prospering farmers 
of St. Joseph township is Henry F. Busching, who has been devoted to 
the development of one of the attractive farms of the community in the 
past years. He is of German birth and parentage, born in Germany on 
October 4, 1857, son of Karl and Sophia Busching, who lived and died 
in their native land. They had five children — Mary, Karl, Henry F., 
Sophia and Minnie. Henry Busching had his education in his native 
community and came to America in 1881, locating first in Fort Wayne, 
where he found work on a farm in that vicinity. He later secured em- 
ployment in the Bass Foundry & Machine Shop was there employed in 
various capacities until 1882, when he located in St, Joseph township, 
purchasing fifty acres of farm land and applying himself to its develop- 
ment. This acreage he has since increased by the purchase of another 
fifty-acre tract, and his farm of one hundred acres is partly improved 
and on the way to further development. Industry and ambition are 
salient qualities of his nature and success is bound to be his portion. 
Indeed, he is already classed with the successful men of the community, 
and rightly so, in view of his accomplishments from the humble begin- 
nings that were his. Mr. Busching was married, in June, 1882, to Mary 
Blume, daughter of Henry and Minnie Blume, early settlers in Allen 
county and highly esteemed among its citizenry. Seven children have 
been born to the Buschings — Addie, Emma, Mary, Fred, Henry, Herman, 
and William. Mary died in July, 1914, and the wife and mother passed 



98 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

away on May 5, 1907. The family are Lutherans and members of that 
church, and take an active part in its activities, as well as in the social 
affairs of the community. Mr. Busching is independent in politics and an 
excellent citizen without being active in the politics of his community. 

James F. Butt — One of the foremost men of Maumee township, 
Allen county, Indiana, is James Butt, born in Erie township, Miami 
county, on March 25, 1860, on the old Wabash & Erie canal. He is the 
son of William and Elizabeth (Lesher) Butt and the grandson of William 
Butt, a pioneer to Allen county from Ohio in 1832. The record of the 
migrations of the Butt family from 1832 up to 1875 accounts for numerous 
changes in residence, and a brief recounting of those moves would read 
something as follows: Came from Pickaway count}^ Ohio, in 1832; 
settled in St. Joseph township, Allen county, Indiana, where they farmed 
until 1846, and then went to Miami county, Indiana, where the son Wil- 
liam, father of the subject, remained until 1863, returning in that year 
to Allen county and settling on a farm in the vicinity of New Haven, 
where he was engaged in farming until the fall of 1865. He then moved 
back to Miami county and remained there until 1867. In the spring of 
that year he came to Allen county once more and there farmed until 
the death of his wife in February, 1869. In the next year he remarried 
and took up his residence in Miami county, remained there to 1875, 
operating a newly acquired farm, and in that year moved to the old home 
farm in Miami county, where he passed the rest of his days, death claim- 
ing him there on March 31, 1907. He was born in Pickaway county, 
Ohio, on May 10, 1829, and his life was that of a successful and energetic 
farmer. There were three children of his first marriage : James F., of 
this review, Ida and Dora. His second wife was the mother of two 
daughters — Effie and Rose. Mr. Butt was a prominent man in his 
community always, and wherever he went found his place in the public 
life of the town and township, and filled numerous public offices during 
his life time. James F. Butt had the average amount of schooling that 
is the lot of the country boy, and when he was sixteen he began active 
farm life on the farm home. He remained on the home place until he 
was twenty-one, gathering an experience and training that guaranteed 
him individual success in his own independent career. He came of age 
in March, 1881, and in June, 1882, bought from his father the home 
farm of 131 acres in Maumee township, which place has formed the 
nucleus of his present farm of 491 acres. It is worthy of mention that 
this 131 acres was deeded by the government to William Butt, grand- 
father of the subject, in 1832, and has been in the family possession ever 
since. William Butt, the original owner, did much improvement work 
on the place, and was himself one of the foremost men of his day in 
that district. He was one of the charter subscribers to the Fort Wayne 
Sentinel, a daily newspaper established in 1833, and the first paper that 
came from the press came into his possession and was cherished by him 
during his lifetime. The present owner of the old Butt farm is recog- 
nized as one of the leading stockmen of Allen county, and he is widely 
known for the Duroc-Jersey hogs he raises on his place each year, from 
six to eight hundred head being the yearly product of the place. It is 
stated on authority that he has sold more hogs yearly than any other 
man in Indiana, with a similar acreage as a basis of operations. In 1915 
he fed 14,000 bushels of corn to that year's hogs. Mr. Butt was married 
on January 18, 1883, to Miss Lucretia Johnson, the daughter of Edward 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 99 

and Cynthia C. (Pearson) Johnson, who were among the early settlers of 
Allen county and were prominent in the county all their active lives. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Butt. Jessie L. is married, 
and she and her husband live on the home place with the parents. They 
have two children — Ivan and John. William Edward, the second child 
of Mr. and Mrs. Butt, is professor of economics in the Kentucky State 
University. He has two children — Olin and Arthur. James F., Jr., is 
married and lives in the vicinity of the old home. He is his father's 
assistant on the home farm. Mr. Butt has taken his place in the public 
life of the community, and it is a notable fact that he served Maumee 
township as trustee in 1884 when he was but twenty-four years of age, 
and held the record then for the youngest trustee in the state. He was 
re-elected in 1886, and since that time has held other offices of public 
trust. He is a Democrat in politics, and fraternally has membership in 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being affiliated with Lodge No. 
463 at Antwerp, Ohio. 

Frederick C. Buuck is to be consistently designated as one of the 
representative farmers of Allen county, and his well improved homestead, 
comprising sixty acres, is eligibly situated in Marion township. That 
he has proved himself loyally interested in community affairs and has 
gained secure place in popular esteem is indicated by the fact that he is 
serving as township trustee, to which office he was elected in 1914. Mr. 
Buuck was born in Adams county, Indiana, February 18, 1864, a son of 
Ernest and Sophia (Kleinschmidt) Buuck, both of whom were born in 
Germany. Ernest Buuck was a lad of seven years when he accompanied 
his parents on their immigration to the United States and the family 
home was established in Adams county, Indiana, where he was reared to 
manhood under the conditions and influences of the pioneer days, assisted 
in the development of the home farm and profited by the advantages of 
the schools of the locality and period. He eventually instituted independ- 
ent operations as a farmer and became one of the prosperous and honored 
exponents of agricultural industry in Adams county, where he continued 
to reside until his death, in 1911, his wife having preceded him to the 
life eternal by about two years, and both having been earnest members 
of the Lutheran church. Mr. Buuck was a Democrat in politics and was 
one of the loyal young men of Indiana who went forth in defense of the 
Union when the Civil war was precipitated on the nation. He enlisted 
as a pi'ivate in Company D, Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, and with this 
gallant command continued in active service at the front until he was so 
severely wounded as to incapacitate him for further activity, with the 
result that he was accorded an honorable discharge, after having taken 
part in a number of severe conflicts. In later years he signalized his 
abiding interest in his old comrades by retaining affiliation with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. Frederick C. Buuck, the immediate sub- 
ject of this review, was the third in orler of birth in a family of eleven 
children; Louise resides in the city of Richmond, Indiana; Minnie is the 
widow of Gustav Rumphe and maintains her home in Fort Wayne ; Ernst 
still remains in Ad-ams county; Martin is deceased; William is a pros- 
perous farmer in Adams county; Mary, Sophia and Anna are deceased; 
Elizabeth is the wife of Christian Mahrnowald, of Jeft'erson township, 
Allen county ; and Christian resides in Fort Wayne. Frederick C. Buuck 
grew to adult age under the invigorating discipline of the home farm, 
continued to assist in its work and management until he was twenty-two 



< -' I ■ .-'■ i 



M 



100 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

years of age and in the meanwhile had not failed to profit by the advan- 
tages afforded in the public schools of his native county. Upon leaving 
the parental home he came to Fort Wayne, where he was employed three 
years in the shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The free and inde- 
pendent life of the farm, though demanding much of arduous toil, made 
insistent appeal to him and caused him soon to resume his alliance with 
agricultural industry. He purchased his present homestead of sixty 
acres, upon which he has made the best of improvements, including the 
erection of his commodious house and other good farm buildings, and 
he has so applied his mental and physical powers as to make of his farm 
industry a distinctive success, his attention having been given to diver- 
sified agriculture and to the raising of good live stock. Mr. Buuck is a 
stalwart in the local camp of the Democratic party, takes lively interest 
in all that concerns the well-being of his home township and county, ahd 
has given most effective service in the office of township trustee. Both 
he and his wife are earnest communicants of the German Lutheran church. 
On December 4, 1888, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Buuck to Miss 
Mary Doehrmann, daughter of Conrad and Minnie (Zwick) Doehrmann, 
of Adams county, and the two children of this union, Martin and Freda, 
still remain at the parental home. 

James B. Cahill is junior member of the representative firm of Getz 
& Cahill, which conducts one of the well appointed undertaking and 
funeral-directing establishments of Fort Wayne, and on other pages of 
this work is made individual mention of his associate in the ' business, 
Joseph F. Getz. Mr. Cahill was born in Cass county, Indiana, on the 
26th of August, 1879, and is a son of James Cahill, who was for a number 
of years engaged in farming in Cass county and who later removed to 
the city of Logansport, that county, and entered the service of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with which he continued his identifica- 
tion many years. He died October 3, 1899, and his wife is living in 
Fort Wayne. James B. Cahill acquired his early education in the St. 
Vincent Catholic parochial schools of Logansport and supplemented the 
same by a course in Hall's Business College of that city. He then 
assumed a position in the Logansport offices of the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company, but later prepared himself for the undertaking 
business, in which connection he acquired a thorough knowledge of the 
modern system of embalming. For a time he was employed in the under- 
taking establishment of Potter & Moffitt, in Muncie, this state, and in 1900 
came to Fort Wayne, where he entered the employ of the firm of Schone 
& Veith, being their first licensed embalmer. With this concern he 
continued his effective services until July, 1908, when he formed a partner- 
ship with Joseph Getz and established their present business enterprise, 
in connection with which they have the most approved facilities for 
careful and consistent service as embalmers and general funeral directors. 
Mr. Cahill is affiliated with the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, 
the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic 
Benevolent League of Indiana, and of the Holy Name Society of the 
cathedral parish of the Catholic church in the city of Fort Wayne, both 
he and his wife being earnest communicants of this parish. He is identi- 
fied also with the Married Men's Society of the cathedral and is a member 
of the Retail Merchants' Association of Fort Wayne. On June 22, 1910, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cahill to Miss Eleanor Reinhart, 
who was born at Fort Wayne June 24, 1880, and who was educated in 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 101 

St, Mary's parochial schools. She is a daughter of Matthias and Anna 
Marie (Bargus) Reinhart, both deceased. 

Stephen A. Callahan is one of the representative younger members 
of the bar of his native county and since his retirement from the office 
of assistant prosecuting attorney of Allen county has been engaged in 
the independent practice of his profession in Fort Wayne, v^ith secure 
standing and reputation as a resourceful trial lawyer and vi^ell fortified 
counselor. Mr. Callahan was born at Fort Wayne on July 30, 1888, and 
is a son of James T. and Margaret (Dolan) Callahan, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania and the latter of Indiana. The father holds the position 
of chief train dispatcher at Fort Wayne for the New York, Chicago & 
St. Louis Railroad, and he and his wife have maintained their home in 
Fort Wayne for thirty years. Of their four children the subject of this 
review is the third; Winifred remains at the parental home; Frank J. 
is associated with the Moran Ice Company; and Robert is, in 1917, a 
student in the Fort Wayne high school. Stephen A. Callahan acquired 
his early education in the excellent Catholic parochial schools of Fort 
Wayne and in preparation for his chosen profession entered the law 
department of the great Valparaiso University, in which he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1909 and from which he received his degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, with virtually coincident admission to the bar 
of his native state. For two and one-half years after his graduation he 
was associated with the well known Fort Wayne law firm of Leonard, 
Rose & Zollars, and he was then appointed deputy prosecuting attorney 
of the county, a position in which he made an admirable record and 
from which he finally retired to engage in active general practice in an 
individual way. Mr. Callahan is a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party, is a communicant of the Catholic church, is affiliated 
with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent & Protective Order of 
Elks, and the Loyal Order of Moose. May 26, 1914, recorded the mar- 
riage of Mr. Callahan to Miss Esther Auger, who likewise was born and 
reared in Fort Wayne and who is a daughter of Louis and Lydia (Bird) 
Auger, the former of whom is deceased. 

Warren D. Calvin, M. D., is above all else a man of distinct individu- 
ality, and that individuality is the positive expression of a strong and 
loyal nature that in turn exemplifies itself in the true stewardship 
of good works and kindly deeds. The Doctor is a man of thought and 
efficient service, and as a true humanitarian he is free from bigotry 
and intolerance in all of the relations of life. He is one of the essen- 
tially representative physicians and surgeons of Allen county and is 
engaged in the practice of his profession in the city of Fort Wayne. 
Like many another American who has achieved success and prestige 
in professional life, Dr. Calvin passed the period of his childhood and 
youth under the effective and invigorating discipline of the farm, and 
of the enduring value of this discipline he is deeply appreciative. On 
the old homestead farm of his father, two and one-half miles distant 
from Bryan. Williams county, Ohio, Dr. Warren D. Calvin was born, 
May 27, 1867, his father having been "a farmer good, with corn and 
beef and plenty," and where he himself early gained a full quota of 
experience as he "mowed and hoed and held the plow," his active asso- 
ciation with the basic industry of agriculture having continued under 
these benign conditions until he was nineteen years of age, the while 
he waxed strong of brain and brawn, as he had not failed to make good 



102 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

use of the advantages of the district schools. In this connection it has 
been recorded that "He attended a country school which at times en- 
rolled more than sixty pupils and which, because of certain local in- 
fluences involved in the personnel of the patrons of that school, was 
peculiarly an intellectual rural center. Algebra and Latin were taught 
at times and from its walls there emerged scores and scores of teachers, 
many of whom later became able representatives of the legal, medical, 
pedagogic and ministerial professions, it being worthy of note that 
one of the students for which this school stood sponsor eventually be- 
came United States representative to Mexico." Dr. Calvin expresses 
his sense of thankfulness for the fortuitous influences that compassed 
him in the formative period of his youth and he reverts with great 
satisfaction to the vitalizing privileges that were his in the school above 
mentioned. He followed the prevailing ambition of the youth of that 
rural community and put his scholastic attainments to practical test 
by entering the field of pedagogic service. At the age of seventeen 
years he assumed charge of his first school, and in the meanwhile he 
furthered his own education by attending the- autumn terms in the 
high school at Bryan, the judicial center of his native county. When 
nineteen years of age he devoted a portion of his time as a traveling 
representative and salesman for A. H. Andrews & Company, manu- 
facturers of school apparatus and furniture, with headquarters in the 
city of Chicago. His vaulting ambition to gain a liberal education 
did not overleap the bounds of practical judgment, and it can not be 
regarded as other than fortunate that the young man was compelled 
to consult ways and means in the attainment of the desired end and 
that he was virtually dependent upon his own resources in defraying 
the expenses of his higher academic and his professional education. 
In the autumn of 1887 Dr. Calvin entered the preparatory department 
of Hiram College, of which institution the late General James A. Garfield, 
former president of the LTnited States, was a graduate and of which he 
later served at president. In this college the Doctor gave his attention 
to fortifying himself further for the vocation of teaching, in which 
field he had at the time a future engagement. However, his desire for 
a higher education resulted in his continuing his studies in Hiram 
College until his graduation, as a member of the class of 1892, and 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science. During his junior and senior 
years he was associated in the editorial work of the two college publi- 
cations — the annual and the periodical college paper. In the meanwhile 
he had formulated definite plans for his future career, and in consonance 
therewith, in September, 1892, he entered the celebrated Rush Medical 
College, in the city of Chicago. There he continued his technical 
studies three years, during which he was joint owner of the college med- 
ical journal, besides having been its editor in chief during the last year. 
He was also the chief promoter and a member of the editorial board 
of the first medical annual ever published in connection with a medical 
college. During the summer vacations of his eight collegiate years 
Dr. Calvin continued his successful service as a traveling salesman for 
A, H, Andrews & Company, the concern previously mentioned, and 
from this service he obtained the financial returns necessary for the 
continuance of his studies. He was graduated in Rush Medical College 
as a member of the class of 1895, and prior to making a permanent 
location he determined to gain preliminary experience of a practical 
and varied order. Thus it was that after receiving his degree of Doctor 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 103 

of Medicine he served his professional novitiate by engaging in active 
general practice at Canby, Yellow Medicine county, Minnesota, where 
he remained nine months. This was followed by one year of surgical 
work of official order along the course of the Chicago drainage canal, 
which was then in course of construction, his headquarters being at 
Riverside. Upon completing this service he came to Fort Wayne, where 
he has been established in the active practice of his profession since 
April, 1897, and where his unequivocal success offers the best voucher 
for his ability, discrimination and personal popularity. He gives his 
attention largely to the phase of practice involved in internal medication 
and he has long controlled a large and representative practice that 
denotes him as one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Allen 
county. Dr. Calvin maintains active and appreciative membership in 
the American Medical Association, the Mississippi Valley Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Tri-State Medical Association, the 12th District Medical 
Society, the Indiana State Medical Society, and the Allen County Medi- 
cal Society. He was a member of the faculty of the Ft. Wayne Medical 
College, and is now (1917) on the Hope Hospital staff. He is medical 
examiner for eight important life insurance companies and has the 
distinction of being a member of the United States Medical Reserve 
Corps, in which he has the rank of first lieutenant. In politics Dr. Calvin 
believes in supporting men and principles rather than being constrained 
by strict partisan lines, but if definite political classification were given 
he would probably be designated as a progressive Republican. In religion 
the Doctor gives his only denial to the family patronymic, for he goes 
far afield from the old Calvinistic doctrines and believes that the 
dogmatic theological creeds are altogether inimical to the interests of 
mankind, the while he maintains that man's religious nature can incor- 
porate all its wants under the two tenets of the fatherhood of God and 
the brotherhood of man, untrammeled by creed, ordinances, definite 
ritualism and mysticism. He believes also that every person should 
have a vacation from his professional or other vocational work, in order 
that the mind may dwell upon a different environment and the cells 
used in the prosecution of his daily employment and thus given a brief 
and complete rest, with resultant vitalization. In harmony with this 
conception. Dr. Calvin has taken trips to various parts of the United 
States and the Canadian provinces, and in each of these digressions 
he has found it his greatest pleasure to view and contemplate the grand 
and beautiful spots of nature, especially in the ascending to the mountain 
heights and fastnesses where nature rules supreme, or at least where 
the puny handicraft of man is comparatively infinitesimal. In June, 
1897, Doctor Calvin wedded Dr. Jessie Carrithers, who is associated 
with him in practice. Like the average American, Doctor Calvin finds 
in his ancestral lineage a record that involves the use of the much- 
discussed hyphen. In short, he is of Scotch, English and Swiss lineage, 
through being a scion of the Scotch family of McGowan, the English 
families of Churchill and Kelsey, and the Calvins of Switzerland. Of 
his forbears who came to America, some established themselves in Puritan 
New England and some in cavalier Virginia. Later migrations brought 
other generations of the respective families into contact in the historic 
old Connecticut Western Reserve of Northern Ohio, and from that 
section of the old Buckeye state came the first representatives of the 
Calvin family into Williams county, Ohio, where the subject of this 
sketch was born. 



104 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

William H. Carbaugh, well-to-do farmer and veteran of the Civil 
war, has been a resident of Allen county for more than fifty years. 
He began his career in this region as a day-laborer, from which phase 
he advanced to the position of renter, and later to the dignity of owner 
of his own place, and he has enjoyed a comfortable prosperity as the 
reward of his honest efforts to gain independence. He was born in 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania, on January 7, 1840, and is the son of 
Joseph and Margaret (Miller) Carbaugh, who came to Whitley county 
in 1856 and passed the remainder of their lives in this region. The 
father worked for years as a laborer. He and his wife reared a family 
of five children. They were Mary Elizabeth, deceased; William H., 
the subject of this sketch; John, who is deceased; Susan Catherine, 
living in Fort Wayne, and Albert, who died in 1915. William H. Car- 
baugh had the typical log-school education common to the youth of his 
time, and he was still quite young when he applied himself to the difficult 
work of clearing land. He worked at that until he was tAventy-two years 
of age, and then enlisted for service in the Civil war. He was a member 
of Company E, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and he served through 
to the end of the war, participating with his regiment in many of the 
hard fought engagements of the war, conspicuous among them being 
Perry ville, Stone's River and Chickamaugua. When the war ended he 
returned home, married soon afterward and with his young wife went 
to Kansas, where he was engaged in various occupations for two years. 
They returned to Allen county in 1875 and Mr. Carbaugh applied himself 
to such work as he could find to do, and for several years was employed 
as a laborer in the community where he settled. In 1876 he rented a 
farm and for some years worked on the basis of a renter, when he was 
able to buy a place of his own. He is living to-day on the forty-acre 
tract he bought then, and on which he gained a pleasing measure of 
financial independence. On March 19, 1867, Mr. Carbaugh was married 
to Miss Elizabeth Johnson, the daughter of James and Rebecca (Baxter) 
Johnson, who came from Pennsylvania to Ohio and thence to Allen 
county in 1854. They were farming people and among the best people 
in their community. A family of fourteen children was reared under 
their roof. They were Noah, Frances, Isabelle, Harriet, Isaac R., Jacob, 
Harvey, Abraham, Elizabeth, Lewis, Josiah, Martha, Anna and John. 
Harvey is living in Lafayette township ; Elizabeth is the wife of the 
subject; Josiah is a resident of Missouri and Anna is living in Wells 
county, Indiana. The others are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Carbaugh 
have three children — Oliver, of Fort Wayne; Frank, of Lafayette town- 
ship, and Alonzo, of Lagrange county, Indiana, where he is engaged 
in farming. Frank had three children — William Arthur, Gertrude Marie 
and Lulah, the last two named surviving. Alonzo has six children — 
Clarence, Edna, Mildred, Ralph, Glenn and Harold. Edna is the wife 
of Claude Lovell, of Lagrange, and Glenn died in 1907. Edna Lovell 
has two children — Alvin Alonzo and Ethel, so that Mr. and Mrs. Car- 
baugh are distinguished among their friends as great-grandparents. 

William L. Carnahan was a man whose character was the positive 
expression of a strong, loyal and noble nature, and it was given him 
to leave a last impress upon the civic and business life of the city of 
Fort Wayne, where he was long and prominently identified with the 
wholesale boot and shoe business and where his fine character and 
superior ability made him a resourceful force in furthering the industrfal 
and commercial prestige of the Allen county metropolis. He was one 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 105 

of the most honored and influential business men of the city at the 
time of his death, which occurred on June 26, 1897, and this history 
exercises a consistent function when it accords within its pages a tribute 
to his memory. Mr. Carnahan was a native of Indiana and a represen- 
tative of a sterling pioneer family of Tippecanoe county, where he was 
born on March 5, 1837. His father became a representative merchant 
in what is now the thriving city of Lafayette, that county, and it was 
in the schools of that place, which was then a mere village, that the 
subject of this memoir acquired his early education. He later was 
graduated in the University of Indiana, at Bloomington, and throughout 
the rest of his long and useful life he was known as a man of fine intel- 
lectual attainments as well as of marked business acumen. At the 
inception of his business career, in 1856, Mr. Carnahan became a pioneer 
of the state of Nebraska, where he remained three years, during which 
time he was engaged in the mercantile business in the city of Omaha, 
besides having served as a clerk in the United States land office at 
that place. In 1860 he returned to Indiana and established himself in 
the mercantile business at Delphi, the judicial center of Carroll county. 
Two years later he returned to Lafayette, where for the ensuing two 
years he was engaged in the boot and shoe business in a retail way. 
He then accepted a position as traveling salesman for the firm of 
Carnahan, Earl & Company, manufacturers of and wholesale dealers in 
boots and shoes, with factory and general headquarters at Lafayette. 
Eighteen months later he was given an interest in the business and the 
title of the firm was then changed to Carnahan Brothers & Company. 
For five and one-half years thereafter Mr. Carnahan continued his re- 
sourceful activities as traveling representative for the firm, and his ster- 
ling character, his ability as a salesman and his unqualified popularity 
proved potent in expanding the business of his firm and popularized its 
products in a constantly expanding trade territory. In 1872 he came to 
Fort Wayne and founded the wholesale boot and shoe house of Carna- 
han, Skinner & Company, and he thereupon assumed the supervision of 
the clerical and sales departments of the new establishment, his fine 
administrative ability and thorough technical knowledge giving him 
special influences in directing the development of the business of the 
new firm, which was succeeded in 1875 by that of Carnahan, Hanna & 
Company. He continued as one of the principal and chief executives 
of this firm and also of its successor, that of Carnahan & Company, 
which was organized in 1886 and in which his coadjutor was 
Emmet H. McDonald. He continued as the executive head of the 
large and prosperous business controlled by this firm until 
death terminated his activities and brought a close to his long and 
honorable business career, throughout which his integrity had been 
inviolable, his progressiveness and energy prodigious and his success 
unequivocal. The fullest measure of success is ever to be won by loyal 
and worthy service, and Mr. Carnahan always measured up to the 
highest standard of business ethics, even as his private life was marked 
by fine ideals and by kindliness and consideration that won to him the 
confidence and high regard of all with whom he came in contact. He 
was essentially a business man, and thus had no desire to enter the 
turbulence of practical politics or to seek public office, though he gave 
a staunch allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and was liberal 
in his civic attitude. He was a consistent member of the Episcopal 
church, as is also his widow, who still maintains her home in Fort Wayne, 



106 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

a city that is endeared to her by the hallowed memories and associations 
of the past. In the year 1864 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Carna- 
han to Miss Clara L. Hanna, daughter of the late James Bayless Hanna, 
eldest son of Judge Samuel Hanna, one of the honored pioneer citizens 
of Allen county, and of this union were born four children, all of whom 
survive the honored father. Louise is the wife of Dr. Nelson Lloyd 
Deming, of Litchfield, Connecticut ; Robert Hanna Carnahan is one of 
the representative business men of Fort Wayne, and Clara C. and Vir- 
ginia C, remain with their widowed mother in the attractive home in 
Fort Wayne and as popular factors in the representative social life 
of their native city. The grandchildren of William L. Carnahan are 
Nelson Lloyd Deming, Jr., and Mary Louise Deming, the children of 
Dr. and Mrs. Deming, and Robert Hanna Carnahan, William Lumbard 
Carnahan and Sidney Lumbard Carnahan, children of Robert Hanna 
Carnahan and Constance Lumbard Carnahan, deceased. 

Charles L. Centlivre. — It was given to the subject of this memoir 
to wield large influence in connection with the upbuilding of one of the 
now extensive and important industrial enterprises of Fort Wayne, that 
of the Centlivre Brewing Company. Mr. Centlivre came to Fort Wayne 
in 1862 and here became associated with his brother, Frank, in the found- 
ing of the Centlivre Brewery, the plant and business of which have been 
developed from a modest nucleus to the point that places the concern 
among the largest and most successful of its kind in Indiana. Charles L. 
Centlivre was a man of sterling character, of splendid energy and re- 
sourcefulness in business and of that intrinsic and well based civic loyalty 
that makes for ideal citizenship. Mr. Centlivre was born at Valdien, 
Canton Dammarie, Arrondissement of Belfort, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France, 
on September 27, 1827, and was sixty-seven years of age at tlie time of 
his death, in 1895. He was reared and educated in his native province 
and there learned the cooper's trade under the effective direction of his 
father. He became a skilled workman through his thorough appren- 
ticeship, and came to America in 1841, the voyage across the Atlantic 
having been made in one of the primitive sailing vessels of the type com- 
mon to that period. Mr. Centlivre established his residence in the city 
of New Orleans, and shortly afterward, when the city became the stage 
of a frightful epidemic of cholera, returned to his native land. After 
a comparatively brief visit to the old home he came again to the United 
States, and on this occasion was accompanied by his father and by two 
of his brothers. Landing in the port of New York city, the father and 
sons came to the middle west and made their home at Massillon, Stark 
county, Ohio. Within a short time Charles L. Centlivre engaged in the 
work of his trade at Louisville, that county, and in 1850 went to Clayton 
county, Iowa, where he established a small brewery in the village of 
McGregor. He was one of the pioneer business men of that section of 
the Hawkeye state and continued to operate his brewery at McGregor 
until 1862, when he came to Fort Wayne and formed a partnership with 
his brother, Frank, in the founding of the Centlivre Brewery. With 
characteristic energy and thoroughness the brothers applied themselves 
to the producing of high-grade output and the incidental development 
of the business. During all the long intervening years the Centlivre 
Brewing Company has maintained the highest reputation for business 
policies of the most upright and progressive order and for the turning 
out of products of the best order. The plant of the company is now one 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 107 

of extensive and thoroughly modern order, and the trade of this pioneer 
industrial concern is of large volume and most substantial ramifications. 
Mr. Centlivre gave his splendid energies to the upbuilding of the busi- 
ness and continued his active association with the enterprise until the year 
prior to his death. He was liberal and public-spirited as a citizen, took 
lively and constant interest in the welfare of the city in which he long 
maintained his home, and as a citizen and business man his name and 
memory are here held in lasting honor. The company of which he was 
one of the founders now bases its operations on a capital stock of three 
hundred thousand dollars, his son, Louis C, is president of the corpor- 
ation, another son, Charles F., is treasurer, and John Ruess is secretary. 

John W. Chapman. — One of the foremost men of Hoagland is John 
W. Chapman, prosperous farmer, now living practically retired from 
farming activities. For more than half a century he applied himself 
diligently to agricultural pursuits, and he is to-day enjoying a well 
earned rest from his labors of those years. Mr. Chapman was born in 
Pennsylvania on April 19, 1834, and is the son of John and Sarah (Keese) 
Chapman, both born in that state. They moved to Ohio in 1844; settled 
on a farm and after four years came to Indiana, settling in Adams 
county. In 1855 they moved to Allen county, and this section of the 
state was their home from then until their death. They were the parents 
of nine children, of which number two are now living. John AV. Chap- 
man was reared and schooled in Indiana, and in early manhood turned 
his attention to farming. From then until the year 1913 he might be 
said to have labored continuously, and it is gratifying to be able to 
note that he succeeded admirably in his work. Two fine farms were 
his at one time, and when he retired from active life, in 1913, he sold 
one place. The other he still owns, though he takes no part in its man- 
agement. In 1865 Mr. Chapman married Miss Eunice Harrod. She 
was born in Allen county, of farming people, and to her and her husband 
five children were born. They are William, Charles L., Almina, Arminda 
E. and Delilah. The last named is deceased and Almina is the wife of 
David McKennan. In 1909 the family suffered the loss of the wife and 
mother, and the entire community mourned her passing. Mr. Chapman 
is a Democrat, but has never been an office holder or a seeker after 
political favors. 

Reason Clayton was a small child when his parents brought him 
from his native state and settled in Allen county, Indiana, and this 
section of the state has been his home without interruption from that 
day to this. He was born in Ohio, Wayne county, on September 22, 
1847, and is the son of John and Elizabeth Smith Clayton. The father 
was a Virginian by birth and the mother an Ohioan. As a young man 
John Clayton left his native state and located in Ohio, where he married, 
and in 1848 he took his family to Allen county. There the mother died 
in 1850, leaving four children, two of whom are now living. The father 
married again, and of six children born of that union all but one are 
living. He married a third time, and one son was born. In 1897 John 
Clayton died at his home in Madison township. Reason Clayton left 
the parental home at the early age of nineteen. He had up to that time 
attended school with a good deal of regularity, and was qualified, ac- 
cording to the standards of the day, to teach in the district schools in 
the winter seasons. This he did for a number of years, teaching during 
the winter months and farming in the summer. In 1888 he bought the 
farm on which he now lives. It comprises 165 acres in Sections 23 and 



108 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

24, in Madison township, and is one of the attractive farms of the com- 
munity. General farming is carried on very successfully, and progres- 
sive and productive methods are favored on the Clayton farm. Mr. 
Clayton is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and is a Democrat in 
politics. He was married in 1872 to Miss Mary Youse, a native daughter 
of Allen county, and they are the parents of three children — Otto 0., 
Flora E., and John Fred. Flora lives at home and John is now in Phila- 
delphia in the government service. Mrs. Clayton is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Guy Colerick is herein mentioned as one of the prominent attorneys 
of the city of Fort Wayne and in the practice of his profession he is 
well maintaining the prestige of the family name. In the legal circles 
of Allen county the Colericks have been prominent since the establish- 
ment of civil courts there, the first of the family to establish himself in 
the practice being David H. Colerick, who came from Lancaster, Ohio. 
He became very prominent as an attorney and as a public spirited citizen, 
and it seemed that his ability was transmitted to his sons, six of whom 
were engaged in the practice of law here at one time. One of these sons 
was Henry Colerick, the father of the subject of this biographical review, 
and he was widely known as one of the leading trial la"\vyers in northern 
Indiana. Guy H. Colerick was born in Fort Wayne, November 20, 1879, 
and in the public schools of that city obtained his preliminary education. 
By a process of natural selection he decided upon the law as his pro- 
fession, and in pursuance of that determination entered the office of his 
uncle, Walpole G. Colerick, where he remained as a student and a 
practioner until 1907, having been admitted to the bar soon after attain- 
ing his majority. In 1907 he formed a partnership with his father, the 
late Henry Colerick, and together they were successfully engaged in 
practice until the death of the latter, in 1909. A partnership was then 
formed by Guy Colerick and Harry G. Hogan, and this association has 
continued to the present time, the firm of Colerick & Hogan having a 
clientele that is representative and of a high order. Mr. Colerick served 
as city attorney — which position was filled by his honored father for a 
number of years — from 1906 to 1910, and after a four-year interim he 
was again appointed to the place, in 1914, and is the present incumbent 
of that office, serving his second term. Mr. Colerick is a Mason, having 
attained to the Fourteenth degree of the Scottish Rite, a member of 
the Loyal Order of Moose and the Benevolent & Protective Order of 
Elks, in which last organization he is a Past Exalted Ruler. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 

Adam CoUis. — For the past thirty-six years Adam Collis has been 
located in Fort Wayne and during that time was in the employ of the 
Pennsylvania system in its machine shops for thirty-five years. He has 
practically watched the city grow up, and almost as many summer suns 
and winter snows have passed over his head as Fort Wayne herself 
has experienced. Mr. Collis was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, 
on August 26, 1847, and is the son of Nicholas and Frances (Balwebber) 
Collis, both born and reared in France. They came to America as young 
people and Mr. Collis located on a Pennsylvania farm, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. He was an ambitious and hard working man, 
and might have passed to a comfortable old age after a life of toil, but 
was killed in middle life as a result of a runaway accident on his farm. 
Adam Collis was the only child. When he was about twelve years old 
the subject moved to Blair county and there went to school a few winter 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 109 

terms. He entered the railroad shops at Altoona, Pennsylvania, and 
there learned the machinist's trade. He took his first position as a boy of 
sixteen in the machine shops of the Pennsylvania road at Altoona, and he 
continued there until 1880, when he came to Fort Wayne, and was here em- 
ployed by the same company, so that his service with the Pennsylvania 
road covered a period of more than half a century. He was pensioned in 
September, 1916. Mr. Collis married Mary Wyrough, of Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania, on January 16, 1872, and they have six children. Frank, the 
eldest, lives in Edmonton, Canada ; John is with the City AVater AVorks 
in Fort Wayne ; James is engaged in mining operations at Prescott, 
Arizona; Oscar is connected with the Emrich Baking Company, of Fort 
Wayne; Hugh is a machinist with the Pennsylvania road, located in 
Fort Wayne, and Mary, the only daughter and the youngest of the 
family, died at the tender age of four years. Mr. Collis and his sons 
are Democrats in politics and the family are members of the Catholic 
church. 

Thomas L. Comparet, who holds the office of bookkeeper for the 
Bass Foundry, an important industrial concern of Fort Wayne, is a 
representative of sterling pioneer families of this favored section of the 
Hoosier state and is a scion of a staunch French family that was early 
settled in Montreal, Canada — fully a century and a quarter ago. He 
whose name initiates this paragraph was born at Fort Wayne August 
1, 1865, and is a son of David F. Comparet, who was born at Fort Wayne 
on March 6, 1826, when the future metropolis of Allen county was little 
more than a frontier hamlet. David F. Comparet was a son of Francis 
and Eleanor (Gnau) Comparet, the former of whom' was born at 
Montreal, Canada, in 1796, it having been given him to become one 
of the very early settlers of northern Indiana and one of the honored 
and . influential pioneers of Allen county, where he had the distinction 
of being the first to serve in the office of coi^nty commissioner. He was 
a charter member of the first Masonic lodge organized at Fort Wayne 
and took deep interest in this fraternity, though he was a communicant 
of the Catholic church, the rules of which he measurably transgressed 
when he became a Mason. David F. Comparet became one of the ener- 
getic and successful business men of Fort Wayne, where he was engaged 
in the operation of a flour mill, besides developing a prosperous enter- 
prise in the buying and shipping of grain, hogs and general lines of farm 
produce. As a young man he wedded Miss Sarah H. Columbia, a daugh- 
ter of Dana Columbia, who established his residence at Fort Wayne in 
1834. David F. Comparet and his wife continued to maintain their home 
in Fort Wayne until her death, and they became the parents of seven 
children : Harriet is deceased ; Charles is now a resident of the city of 
Indianapolis ; Fannie is deceased ; Addie is the wife of Henry W. Matson ; 
William is deceased ; Thomas L., of this review, was the next in order of 
birth, and Thomas is deceased. Thomas L. Comparet acquired his early 
education in the Fort Wayne schools and when but twelve years of age 
he began also his experience in connection with the practical affairs 
of life, by serving as a newsboy for the Fort Wayne Gazette. Later 
he assumed a clerical position in the employ of the Lake Shore and 
Michigan Southern Railroad, subsequently being similarly in the service 
of the Lake Erie and Western Railroad, his labors in these two connec- 
tion having covered a period of about eight years. For one year there- 
after he was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and 
he then assumed the position of cashier for the Empire Line. In 1893 



110 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

he became bookkeeper for the wholesale grocery house of McDonald 
& Watt, with which concern he thus continued his services until 
August, 1895, since which time he has held the responsible position of 
bookkeeper for the Bass Foundry, with high standing as a capable 
executive and skilled accountant. Mr. Comparet takes loyal interest 
in all things touching the welfare and progress of his native city and 
county, is a Republican in his political allegiance, is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and. 
both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
On September 25, 1888, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Comparet 
to Miss Jennie F. Cam; bell, who was born and reared in Allen county 
and vWio is a daughter of George B. and Lydia (Wass) Campbell, the 
former a native of the state of New York und the latter of Allen county, 
Indiana. Mr. Cam'^bell was a popular conductor in the service of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company and was killed '-■'■ a railway accident, 
his widow being still a resident of Fort Wayne and Mrs. Comparet being 
the eldest of their two children : the younger of the children is George 
E., who resides in Fort Wayne and is cashier in the local offices of the 
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. Of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Comparet the eldest is Irene, who Avas born October 30, 1890. 
and who is the wife of Carl Getz, the efficient city forester of Fort 
Wayne ; Myrtle, who was born August, 1893, died in infancy ; Irma, 
who was born August 24, 1896, and Ralph, who was born in 1890, remain 
at the parental home. 

Eli Conrad is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Bartch) Conrad, who 
settled in Allen county, in 1871, and there spent the remaining years 
of their lives. The son, Eli, was born on February 8, 1879, one of a family 
of twelve sons and daughters reared on the homestead farm in Cedar 
Creek township. The others are John, of Wells county, Indiana; Jacob, 
of Grabill, in Cedar Creek township ; Henry, who is deceased ; Elizabeth, 
also deceased ; Minnie, the wife of William Shultz, of Fort Wa.yne ; Kath- 
erine, the wife of Albert Freis, of Springfield township ; Susan, who mar- 
ried Andrew Roth, of Grabill ; Lydia, a school teacher in Cedar Creek 
township ; Andrew, of Grabill ; Albert, also of that place, and a daughter 
who died in infancy, and who was the seventh child. Eli and Elizabeth, 
it should be said, were twins. The father of this family was an Ohioan 
by birth and a native of Star county, while the mother was of German 
birth and ancestr5^ She came to America in girlhood and died in 1886. 
Eli Conrad remained on the home farm until he reached the age of 
twenty-two, when he went to St. Joe, Indiana, and there engaged in the 
implement business. After one year he returned to Cedar Creek town- 
ship and became identified with the buying and shipping of stock in his 
county, to which work he has since been devoted with much success. He 
has also become the owner of a fine farm in Section 18 and his residence 
is one of the comfortable and spacious ones of his township. Mr. Conrad 
was married to Lydia Roth on September 4, 1907. She was born in Allen 
county and is a daughter of Levi and Elizabeth (Witmer) Roth, which 
family is mentioned elsewhere in the pages of this work as prominent 
and popular residents of the town of Grabill. To Mr. and Mrs. Conrad 
two sons have been born — Willard Willmore, born August 20, 1909, and 
Paul Severn, born on August 15. 1911. Mr. Conrad is a Republican and 
is prominent in the activities of the local Grange, of which he is a director, 
and with his wife has membership in the Mission church. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY HI 

Ernest W. Cook, vice-president and secretary of the Citizens Trust 
Company, of Fort Wayne, and prominently identified with other local 
business institutions of representative order, is a scion of staunch Rev- 
olutionary stock in America and in all of the relations of life has exem- 
plified true American spirit. His versatility and progressiveness have 
been shown through his association with varied phases of business enter- 
prise, and he has even endured the strenuous ordeal of close alliance 
with newspaper enterprise. As one of the loyal citizens and representa- 
tive business men of Fort Wayne he is properly given definite recogni- 
tion in this history. Mr. Cook was born at Manchester, Delaware 
county, Iowa, on February 5, 1861, a date indicating that his parents 
were numbered among the pioneers of the Hawkeye state. He is a son 
of Albert H. and Emily J. (Knapp) Cook, the former of whom was born 
in the vicinity of Saratoga Springs, New York, and the latter in New 
England, wiiere her ancestors settled in the early colonial days, her 
paternal grandfather having been a valiant soldier under General Wash- 
ington in the war of the Revolution. Albert H. Cook and his wife were 
persons of superior education and both became successful teachers in 
the public schools, the father having long devoted his attention to service 
in the pedagogic profession. He died at the age of sixty-eight years 
and his widow maintains her home in Fort Wayne. He was a stalwart 
Republican in politics and he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, as is also his widow. Of the children the subject of this review 
is the eldest ; Clarence F. is associated with the Overland Automobile 
Company in Fort Wayne ; Rose L., was for twenty-five years employed 
in the offices of the Tri-State Bank, of Fort Wayne, and Alba is the 
wife- of Jesse F. Patterson, of Logansport, Indiana, her husband being a 
division superintendent of the Vandalia Railrt^ad. Ernest W. Cook 
acquired his early education in the public schools of Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
and his initial business experience was gained when he was a lad of 
twelve years. At this juncture in his career he vitalized and adorned 
the independent vocation of newsboy, and later found employment in 
the office of the Fort Wayne Sentinel, under the direction of William 
Fleming. He projected his ramifications into all departments of news- 
paper work, and the experience he thus gained justified the oft-repeated 
statement that the discipline of a newspaper office is the equivalent 
of a liberal education. Finally he emancipated himself from the thrall 
of journalism and became cashier in the Fort Wayne freight house of 
the Wabash Railroad. Later he was freight and ticket agent for the 
same road in the city of Defiance, Ohio, and in 1893 he returned to Fort 
Wayne and became associated with the late Hon. Perry A. Randall and 
Robert T. McDonald in the purchase of the plant and business of the 
Ryan Transfer & Storage Company. He was manager of this business 
about three years, and then sold his interest in the same to assume the 
office of secretary of the Allen County Loan & Savings Association, 
in the development of which he wielded much influence and his alliance 
with which continued until 1899. In 1900 Mr. Cook became identified Avith 
the organization and incorporation of the Citizens Trust Company, of Fort 
Wayne, of which he has served as secretary since that time and of which 
he has been vice-president also since 1915. He has shown energy and 
ability in the upbuilding of the business of this substantial and repre- 
sentative financial institution and is a prominent figure in the financial 
circles of northern Indiana. Mr. Cook has ever been an ardent advocate 
of the principles of the Republican party, has been an active worker in its 



112 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

ranks and for tAventy years served as treasurer of the committee in Allen 
county. In the Masonic fraternity he has received the thirty-second 
degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, his maximum York Rite 
affiliation being with Fort Wayne Commandery of Knights Templars, 
besides which he is a member of the adjunct Masonic body, the Mystic 
Shrine. He is affiliated also with the local organizations of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, Aside from his association with the Citi- 
zens Trust Company Mr. Cook is a director of the Lincoln Life Insurance 
Company and the Trade Mark Title Company, and was for a time treas- 
urer of the Physicians' Defense Company, which latter was merged with 
the Medical Protective Company. He has been specially zealous and 
influential in connection with the work of the public schools of Fort 
Wayne, has been a member of the board of education since 1905 and is 
now president of the board. Mr. Cook is a man of broad intellectual 
ken and much literary ability, and he has made many effective contribu- 
tions to the columns of the Fort W^ayne newspaper press — especially in 
the promotion of high civic ideals and progressive industrial and commer- 
cial policies. On September 11, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr, 
Cook to Miss Charity Carnrike, daughter of John Carnrike, of Fort 
Wayne, and concerning the children of this union the following brief 
data are available : Harry L., is assistant superintendent of one of the 
great steel mills at Gary, Indiana; Frank E., is owner of a restaurant at 
Seal Beach, California, and Flora E., is the wife of Walter H, Bauer, 
general manager of the American Chicle Company in the city of New 
York. 

William P. Cooper has the best of reasons for paying the staunchest 
allegiance to his native city of Fort Wayne and to northern Indiana, 
for he is a scion of one of the most honored and influential families of 
this section of the Hoosier commonwealth, his father having settled in 
Fort Wayne in 1824, when the old fort was still in evidence and when 
Indians were yet to be found in large numbers in this part of the state. 
The pioneer house that was erected by his father, in 1835, at the site 
now designated as 321 East Berry street. Fort Wayne, figures as the 
birthplace of William Pinkney Cooper, and the date of his nativity was 
August 27, 1852. His father, Henry Cooper, was born at Havre de Grace, 
Maryland, in 1793, and was a representative of one of the patrician 
colonial families of that historic commonwealth. Henry Cooper received 
in his youth the best of educational advantages, as guaged by the stan- 
dards of the locality and period, and he became a man of fine intellectual 
and professional attainments. He was the second lawyer admitted to 
practice in Allen county, Indiana, and gained precedence as one of the 
most able and distinguished members of the Indiana bar of the early 
days, his practice before the supreme court of the state having been 
for a considerable period larger than that of any other lawyer eligible 
for practice in that tribunal, at Indianapolis. His name appears fre- 
quently in the Blackford reports of the decisions of the supreme court 
and also in the other early Indiana court reports. By very reason of 
conditions prevailing in the pioneer days his law business was one of 
broad itineracy, and extended throughout the various counties of north- 
ern Indiana, He made his appearance in the courts at the judicial 
centers of the various counties by traveling back and forth on horseback, 
with the old-time saddlebags, in which he carried his requisite legal 
books. In the same manner he made his journeys to the capital city of 
the state, and he followed trails through the forests, frequently forded 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 113 

streams and lived up to the full tension of pioneer days in thus making 
his visitations to such now important centers as Indianapolis, Wabash, 
Huntington, Goshen, Elkhart and South Bend. He was distinguished 
for his profound learning, brilliant repartee and dignity of character. 
He was a man of most gracious personality and for many years his his- 
pitable home, on East Berry street, Fort Wayne, was the stage of much 
of the representative social life of the little town. Letters which he wrote 
to his wife from Indianapolis and which are now in the possession of his 
son, William P., of this review, specially warned her against letting the 
children play with the Indians, the town at that time having been a 
mere straggling settlement around the old fort which gave to the present 
city its name. Henry Cooper's first wife bore the family name of Silvers, 
and both of their children, Edward and Henry, are deceased. After the 
death of the wife of his young manhood, Henry Cooper, Sr., wedded Mrs. 
Eleanor Munson, who was the widow of James P. Munson, and who had 
two children by her first marriage. The elder of the two, Charles A. 
Munson, became a prominent citizen of Fort Wayne and served as sheriff 
of Allen county. At the time of his death, which occurred in Mercy 
hospital, Chicago, in 1901, Mr. Munson Avas the western representative 
in that city of the Fort Wayne Electric Works. He was twice made the 
Democratic nominee for state auditor of Indiana, but his defeat in each 
instance was compassed by normal political exigencies. Lucretia M. 
Munson, the younger of the two children, is the widow of Diedrich 
Meyers and resides in Fort Wayne. William P. Cooper, of this sketch, 
is the only child of his father's second marriage, and he was about six 
months of age at the time of the death of his distinguished sire, in March, 
1853. His devoted mother passed away November 19, 1883, at the age 
of 70 years and 5 months. Mr. Cooper secured his elementary education 
in the public schools of Fort Wayne, graduating from the high school 
in 1868. He for a short time served as city editor of the Fort Wayne 
Gazette and then entered Dartmouth College, where he was graduated 
in 1873. His taste for literature and his fine critical acumen were rec- 
ognized at college and, with other honors, he was made class poet. 
After his graduation he studied law in the Columbia Law School, New 
York city, and also in the office of Cook & Nassau of that city, and 
with Hon. Robert Lowry, of Fort Wayne. However, the field of journalism 
held for him more attraction, and he relinquished his legal studies and 
began his professional life as city editor of the Fort Wayne News, being 
also at different times city editor of the Sentinel, the Gazette and the 
Journal, besides serving efficiently as Fort Wayne correspondent for the 
metropolitan papers. With a literary style of marked simplicity and 
directness, his was the rare charm of a "wit that without wounding 
could hit," but while his humor would lend grace alike to the worst 
prosaic "locals" or to an important article, his perfect taste was his 
marked characteristic. In 1888 Mr. Cooper left Fort Wayne to take a 
position on the editorial staff of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, where 
he also did special work covering assignments of importance in and out 
of St. Louis. Later he returned to Fort Wayne to become managing 
editor of the Journal for a short time, when he quit journalism and en- 
entered into the insurance business. In this were also exhibited those 
sterling qualities which insured his former success and in 1895 he was 
appointed general agent of the New York Life Insurance Company which 
responsible position he still holds. Socially Mr. Cooper belongs to the Greek 
letter society. Kappa Kappa Kappa of Dartmouth College, is a member 



114 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of the Commercial Club, and is a member and ex-president of the North- 
ern Indiana Life Underwriters Association. In June, 1896, he was elected 
a member of the board of school trustees, serving three years, the last 
two years as president of the board. In 1901 he was appointed a member 
of the Board of State Charities, serving under the administrations of 
both Governor Durbin and Governor Hanley. August 30, 1887, Mr. 
Cooper was united in marriage with Miss Nellie Brown, of Lafayette, 
Indiana, a woman of fine intellect and an artist of marked ability, and 
to them was born, July 10, 1888, a son, Brown, was was graduated in the 
Fort Wayne high school in 1906, and then entered his father's Alma 
Mater, Dartmouth College, from which he received, in 1910, the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and has since been associated with his father in the 
life insurance business. Politically Mr. Cooper is a Democrat, but de- 
clined to support the free-silver doctrines of Mr. Bryan and twice voted 
for McKinley. He represents the best type of citizen and dignified self- 
respecting manhood. 

Thomas B. Coppock, secretary, treasurer and manager of the S. P. 
Coppock & Sons Lumber Company, is distinctively one of the vigorous 
and progressive young business men of Fort Wayne and the company of 
which he is an executive is one of the most important lumber concerns 
in northern Indiana, with headquarters in the city of Fort Wayne and 
with branch yards at Memphis, Tennessee, and Tyronza, Arkansas — so 
that its supply of resources and incidental facilities are of the best. 
As practical manager of the large yards and general business in Fort 
Wayne, Thomas B. Coppock has shown exceptional energy and resource- 
fulness and represents the best type of the aggressive young business 
men of the twentieth century. The youngest in the family of nine chil- 
dren, Mr. Coppock was born at Beloit, Mahoning county, Oliio, on March 
14, 1882, and he is a son of Samuel P. and Anna (Buckman) Coppock, 
both natives of Pennsylvania. The father became prominently identified 
with the lumber business in Ohio and in 1898 removed with his family 
to Fort Wayne, where he established the present business of the S. P. 
Coppock & Sons Lumber Companj^ which is incorporated under the 
laws of Indiana, and in the control of which two of his sons are asso- 
ciated with him. He is one of the representative citizens of Fort Wayne, 
a broad-guaged business man of wide experience, and one who is liberal 
and public-spirited in his civic attitude. His wife is now deceased. 
Thomas B. Coppock is indebted to the public schools of the Buckeye 
state for his early educational discipline and he was about sixteen years 
of age at the time of the family removal to Fort Wayne. Here he availed 
himself of the advantages of the high school and thereafter completed a 
thorough course in a local business college. Since leaving school he has 
been actively identified with the business founded by his father, and in 
the connection he has fully demonstrated his initiative and executive 
ability. He gives loyal support to the cause of the Republican, party, 
is a member of the Fort Wayne Rotary Club, and in the Masonic fraternity 
has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, the York Rite and the Shrine. On May 28, 1908, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Coppock to Miss Mabel Coverdale, who was born 
and reared in Fort Wayne, her father, Asahel S. Coverdale, being one of 
the principals of the grocery firm of Coverdale & Archer, of this city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Coppock have one child, a daughter, Martha Florence. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 115 

John Coutter. — John Coulter's parents were German people who 
came to America in their youth, married and settled in Dearborn county, 
Indiana, and there engaged in farming and lived active and wholesome 
lives for many years. They reared a fine family of eleven children, the 
subject being the first born, and about five years ago they retired from 
activities attendant upon farm life and settled down to a quiet and 
peaceful old age, secure in the esteem and confidence of their many 
friends and able to enjoy with a good conscience the fruits of their 
earlier years of toil. Tliey were Andrew and Louise (Meyer) Coutter, 
and their children are here briefly mentioned as follows: John, the 
subject of this sketch ; Sarah, living in Cincinnati, Ohio ; Elizabeth, who 
is deceased; Carrie, also deceased; Catharine, living in Aurora; Anna; 
William, also of Aurora, Indiana; Mary, Henry and an infant child are 
deceased, and Charles, the youngest of the family, lives in Illinois. John 
Coutter was brought up to farm life, and he and his brothers and sisters 
had their schooling in the schools of Dearborn county. In 1886, when 
he was twenty-five years old, he left the home farm, where he had been 
his father's valued and able assistant, and settled on a rented place, 
the occasion of his removal being his marriage, which took place in the 
same year. He rented for ten years and was a successful farmer, despite 
the fact that he owned no land. In 1896 he returned to the home place, 
and after a short while bought a farm of ninety-one acres in Pleasant 
township. He has applied himself with diligence to the work of manag- 
ing this farm from then to the j)resent time, and has enjoyed a very 
marked success in the years that have passed. Mr. Coutter was married 
on February 17, 1886, to Miss Anna Harris, the daughter of John and 
Margaret (Greave) Harris. They were German people who came to 
America in young life, and they recall that the trip covered a period of 
fourteen weeks. As farming people they have been most successful, and 
they have affiliated themselves with American life in such a manner as 
to be recognized among the best citizens in their community. They were 
the parents of a fine family of eleven children, named Henry, Dorothy, 
Margaret, Mary, Anna, John, William, Sophia, Matilda, William Henry, 
Benjamin and Fred. Henry and William died, and when the ninth child 
was born his parents named him William Henry in memory of the others. 
Anna became the wife of Mr. Coutter, and they have a family of five 
children — Ernest, Homer, Louise, Clare and Martin. The eldest, Ernest, 
is located in Fort Wayne, where he is associated as a bookkeeper with 
the City Lighting Plant; Homer is deceased; Louise married Thaddeus 
Grossman and the two younger children are still with their parents. 
Mr. Coutter is a Democrat in politics, and he and his family are members 
of the Lutheran church, of which faith their families have long been 
faithful adherents. 

David H. Crabill. — The parents of David Crabill are found mentioned 
at some length in another article in these pages, so that it is sufficient 
to say at this point that they were David and Sophia (Ridenour) Crabill, 
and to proceed with data concerning the life and activities of the im- 
mediate .subject. David H. Crabill was born in Ohio on February 18, 
1845, and died on March 25, 1916, at his home in Monroe township, where 
he had lived for more than a quarter of a century. He was a farmer all 
his life, as were his parents before him. He had his education in Allen 
county, where his family had located when he was a small child, and in 
1875 he married Marj^ J. Laughlin, who was born in Lake township, 



116 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Allen county, and was the daughter of James and Catherine (Darby) 
Laughlin, both natives of Pennsylvania who settled in Allen county, 
Indiana, soon after their marriage. These sturdy people were pioneers 
in every sense of the word, and they knew Allen county in the early 
days when its green acres of the present period were covered with dense 
forest growths. Mr. Laughlin hewed a small open space in the wilder- 
ness he chose to locate upon and there built a rude cabin home, with 
typical puncheon floor and string latch peculiar to the day. There they 
lived and with the passing years the forest faded away gradually, as 
a result of the constant labors of Mr. Laughlin and his growing family, 
so that the time came when they found themselves the possessors of 
broad acres that yielded rich harvests annually. Of their six children 
born there, two are now living, and the parents themselves have long 
since passed on. Following his marriage to Mary Laughlin, the daughter 
of these pioneers, Mr. Crabill bought a farm of 115 acres in Section 
eight, Monroe township, and that place has been the family home down 
to the present day. Mr. Crabill made a point of intelligent farming and 
as a result enjoyed a pleasureable degree of material success in his 
work. Six children were born to them — Emma C, Agnes Sophia, John E., 
Charles L., Frank D., and another who died in infancy. Mr. Crabill 
died in March, 1916, leaving his widow comfortably established in the 
family home. 

George D. Crane. — There was no element of futility or indirectness 
in the career of the late George D. Crane, of Fort Wayne, who here 
maintained his home for half a century and who expressed amidst 
"all of the changes and chances of this mortal life" the assurance of 
strong and worthy manhood. He was long known as one of the able 
and influential exponents of expert accounting and abstracting in Fort 
Wayne, his sterling character and his unquestioned ability gained to him 
inviolable confidence and esteem and he was made the administrator or 
trustee of several large estates in Allen county. He continued his asso- 
ciation with his business until his death and was deeply interested in 
the preparing and maintaining of authentic abstracts of real estate titles 
in his home county. He was a broad-minded, upright and loyal citizen, 
was a stalwart advocate of the principles of the Republican party, was 
a Knight Templar Mason and was an earnest member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, as is also his widow. It may consistently be said that 
he was one of the pioneer business men of Fort Wayne at the time of 
his demise and it is but consonant that in this history be entered a 
tribute to his memory. Mr. Crane was born in Montgomery county, 
New York, on February 6, 1842, and thus he was seventy-four years of 
age when he was summoned to the life eternal, on June 22, 1916. He 
was a son of Edward S. and Catherine (Lawson) Crane, both likewise 
natives of the old Empire state, where the father was a farmer. In 1856 
the family removed from New York state to Stephenson county, Illinois, 
and the parents passed the closing years of their lives at Freeport, that 
county. Their children were four in number — Adaline, Louisa, Char- 
lotte and George D. — and all are now deceased except Louisa, who re- 
mains with Mrs. Crane in the attractive old family home in Fort Wayne 
and in the most gracious companionship since the death of the revered 
husband and brother. Mr. Crane gained his early education in the 
schools of his native state and was a lad of fourteen years at the time 
of the family removal to Illinois. He continued to attend school at 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 117 

Freeport and later completed a course in a commercial college. His 
initial business experience was in the insurance business at Freeport, 
when he was eventually transferred to Dayton, Ohio, where he remained 
until he came to Fort Wayne, about the year 1866, Here he became 
associated with Sanford Lombard in the insurance business, and so 
continued for a brief period. On February 17, 1869, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Crane to Mrs. Addie J. (Edsal) Bayless, who has been 
a resident of Fort Wayne from the time of her birth and who is a 
daughter of John and Mary (DeKay) Edsal, who were born and reared 
in New Jersey and who were numbered among the sterling pioneers of 
Fort Wayne. Mrs. Crane is the only one surviving of a family of three 
children and she was an infant at the time of her father's death. In her 
widowhood Mrs. Crane is sustained and comforted by the hallowed 
memories that touch the long and devoted companionship of her husband 
and herself, and she is further fortified by the filial solicitude of her two 
children and by the love of friends who are tried and true. Of the 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Crane the elder is Harvey E., who holds a posi- 
tion with the Fort Wayne Electric Works ; and Alice is the wife of Frank 
D. Bond, of this city. 

George Rockhill Craw is a native son of Fort Wayne who has shown 
much versatility and resourcefulness as a business man and whose activ- 
ities have been varied and important in connection with the newspaper 
and advertising business. He established and developed in the city of 
Chicago the George R. Craw Advertising Agency, but eventually, in 1913, 
sold this business to engage in cutlery manufacture, which business he 
sold in order that he might return to Fort Wayne and assume the super- 
vision of his father's large and important business interests, the impaired 
health of his sire having brought about the latter 's virtual retirement. 
Upon his return to Fort Wayne George R. Craw assumed, among other 
responsibilities, the active charge of the Portland furnished apartment 
building, a fine modern structure owned by his father and aunt. In the 
spring of 1914 he effected the organization of the Portland Hotel Apart- 
ments Company, of which he is now president, secretary and treasurer, 
as well as manager, his father having been president of the company up 
to the time of his death, February 14, 1917. George R. Craw was born 
in Fort Wayne March 10, 1875, and is a son of Edward L. and Maria 
(Rockhill) Craw, the former a native of Cleveland, Ohio, where his father 
served as sheriff of Cuyahoga count}' during the Civil war, and the latter 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana, where her father, William Rockhill, established 
his home many years ago, in the early pioneer epoch of the city's history. 
Edward L. Craw, who at the time of his death was practically retired, 
was for a long period a prominent exponent of the real estate business 
in Fort Wayne and did much to advance the physical development and 
upbuilding of the city. He was one of the honored and influential citizens 
of the Allen county metropolis and seat of government ; served in former 
years as assistant postmaster of Fort Wayne, a position of which he 
continued the incumbent sixteen years. He was a staunch supporter 
of the cause of the Republican party and a communicant of Trinity 
church, Protestant Episcopal, as was also his wife, who died in 1900. 
Of the three children the subject of this review is the only survivor, 
James Edward and Esther Louise having died in infancy. George R. 
Craw attended the Fort Wayne public schools until he had profited by 
the advantages of the high school, and at the age of nineteen years be- 



118 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

came advertising manager of the Fort "Wayne Journal-Gazette. In this 
connection his record was one of successful achievement and after some 
years of service he went to the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, and became 
advertising manager for the leading firm of Pettibone Brothers Manu- 
facturing Company, military purveyors and manufacturers of lodge para- 
phernalia and regalia. After holding this position two years he went 
to the city of Chicago and assumed the position of editor of the Mail 
Order Journal. Later he there organized and established the George R. 
Craw Advertising Agency, and his technical ability and experience en- 
abled him to develop a substantial and prosperous business. After 
disposing of his interest in this agency he became identified with the 
cutlery-manufacturing business in Chicago until the ill health of his 
father led him to return to Fort Wayne, as previously noted. Mr. Craw 
developed in connection with his newspaper and magazine work in 
Chicago, special literary ability, and his editorial work was of superior 
order. He wrote for and conducted special investigations for the Chicago 
Tribune and wrote for numerous periodicals. He was made a member 
of the famous Chicago Press Club, and finds satisfaction in maintaining 
this affiliation since he departed from the western metropolis. His politi- 
cal allegiance is given to the Republican party and he and his wife hold 
membership in Trinity church, Protestant Episcopal. On July 21, 1913, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Craw to Miss Blanche Marie Collins, 
who was born and reared in Chicago, and the one child of this union is 
a winsome little daughter, Barbara Jane, who was born May 13, 1915. 

William H. Crighton, who holds the position of chief draftsman at 
the Fort "Wayne plant of the General Electric Company, is a man of 
recognized technical and executive ability and is consistently to be 
designated as one of the unequivocally popular and public-spirited citi^ 
zens of the Allen county metropolis. Mr. Crighton was born at Fort 
"Wayne on the 19th of October, 1864, and is a son of "William and Mary 
Elizabeth (Kennedy) Crighton, the former of whom was born in Man- 
chester, England, and the latter in Guelf, Canada. "William Crighton died 
January 2, 1917, after many years of active and effective service as a 
mechanical engineer. He was a staunch Republican in politics and an 
active member of the Presbyterian church. His wife died March 23, 
1909. Of their children, three are deceased — John, Stanley and Grace, 
The surviving children are : David, Thomas, "William H, Jane and Frank. 
"William H. Crighton attended the public schools of Fort "Wayne until 
he had attained the age of sixteen years, when he found employment 
at the plant of the Kerr-Murray Manufacturing Company, with which he 
remained about six years, during which he gained practical and varied 
experience as a draftsman and fortified himself excellently for the pro- 
fession to which he has continued to give his attention in a successful 
and influential way. He was thereafter in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company for several years and, in 1891, he became asso- 
ciated with the drafting department of the General Electric "Works at 
Fort "Wayne, with which important concern he is now chief draftsman. 
He is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife are active members 
of the First Presbyterian church. On the 4th of June, 1891, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Crighton to Miss Luretta Esther Hulse, who 
was born and reared in Fort "Wayne, and their three children are Ken- 
nethe, Malcolm and Stanley. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 119 

Calvin Crow comes of a family of old settlers in Allen county, his 
' paternal grandfather having settled there with his family as early as 
1851. Even at that time, it might almost have been said that Wilderness 
was King, and the section and a half that this sturdy pioneer bought 
for a homestead was in a state of nature, and aflPorded ample opportunity 
for the exercise of the virtues of energy, industry, patience and perse- 
verence, not even omitting the virtue of pluck, which is the inevitable 
team-mate of the others. The family came from Morrow county, Ohio, 
where they had been long established, and the grandsire of the' subject 
was long a prominent man in his community, serving as county com- 
missioner of Allen county for many years. He was a Democrat, a staunch 
Methodist and his family was reared in that faith. James Crow, his son, 
spent his life in devotion to the farming industry in Lafayette township, 
and he died there. His widow survives and is now resident in Zanesville. 
She was Lydia Boelinger in maidenhood. The children of James and 
Lydia Crow were five in number. Calvin, subject of this sketch, was the 
first born. Peter, the second child, died in boyhood, and Joseph died in 
infancy. Michael lives in Wells county, Indiana, where he is engaged in 
the contracting business, and Martin died at the age of seventeen years. 
Calvin Crow was born in Lafayette township on December 16, 1861, and 
was reared on the home farm and educated in the common schools of his 
native village. He was reared to a thorough knowledge of farm life 
and the duties attendant upon such life, and when he decided to establish 
a home of his own, he rented a farm and settled down to make a living 
from the soil. He prospered and in a few years became the owner of a 
fine farm of 117 acres, on Avhich he lives at this time. He is reckoned 
among the capable and progressive farming men of the township today, 
and is well entitled to the distinction. He is a Democrat, like his father 
and grandfather, a member of the Odd Fellows and of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He was married on June 23, 1887, to Miss Laura Swank, 
the daughter of Thomas Swank, now deceased. She died on November 
12, 1912, and is buried in Zanesville, Indiana. She was the mother of two 
children — Claude, a prosperous farmer who is married and the father 
of a little daughter, Helen Marie Crow, and Carrie, the wife of Glenn 
Kiplinger. 

Arnold G. W. Curdes is one of the progressive young business men 
of his native city of Fort Wayne and though he prepared himself for 
and did successful work in the legal profession, he has found it more 
to his taste to give his attention to vigorous business enterprise and is 
now engaged in the building of high-grade houses in Fort Wayne, as a 
representative of the Home Builders' Association. Mr. Curdes was born 
in Fort Wayne on April 2, 1887, and is a son of Louis F. and Clara J. 
(Harris) Curdes, the former a native of Wittesingen, in Hessen, Germany, 
where he was born in the year 1863, and the latter was born at Reading, 
Pennsylvania, in 1865. Further mention of the parents is not demanded 
in this connection, for on other pages is entered a review of the career 
of the father, who is a sterling and honored citizen of Fort Wayne. 
Arnold G. W. Curdes continued his studies in the Fort Wayne public 
schools until he had completed a course in the high school, and thereafter 
he attended the Culver Military Academy, the celebrated Indiana school 
situated on the shores of Lake Maxinkuckee. He next entered the law 
department of the University of Indiana, in which he was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1906, and from which he received the degree of 



120 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Bachelor of Laws, with virtually coincident admission to the bar of his 
native state. From 1907 to 1909, inclusive, he was engaged in the general 
practice of his profession in Fort Wayne, and for the ensuing two years 
he held the position of general manager of the Fort Wayne Hosiery Com- 
pany. Since his retirement from this position he has given his attention 
most successfully to home building enterprise in his native city, and in 
this field of endeavor he has found ample scope and opportunity for the 
achieving of success worthy of the name. His political allegiance is given 
to the Republican party, his religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, 
and in the time-honored Masonic fraternity his ancient-craft affiliation 
is with Home Lodge, No. 342, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons. He has 
received also the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite of Masonry and is affiliated with Mizpah Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, besides being a member of Concordia 
Lodge, No. 228, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On August 18, 1908, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Curdes to Miss Mabel Edith Wood, 
daughter of Frank and Margaret (Steinhaur) Wood, of Fort Wayne, 
and the two children of this union are Virginia Wood Curdes and Louis 
Arnold Curdes, their respective years of birth having been 1909 and 1910. 
Louis F. Curdes has shown in his independent career a vital energy 
and resourcefulness that have brought to him not only a large measure 
of success but also a position of prominence and influence in connection 
with one of the most important lines of enterprise touching the civic and 
material welfare and progress of the community. As a vigorous repre- 
sentative of the real estate business he has done much to further the ad- 
vancement and upbuilding of the city of Fort Wayne, and his versatility 
and his cumulative success are the more gratifying to note by reason of 
the fact that, coming from Germany to America when a mere youth, 
he has relied entirely upon his own resources in making his way forward 
to the goal of independence and prosperity — the record of his advance- 
ment offering both lesson and incentive. Louis Frank Curdes was born 
in the village of Wettesingen, Province of Hessen Cassel, Germany, May 
22, 1863, and is a son of Henry and Henrietta (Klingelhofer) Curdes, both 
of whom passed their entire lives in that section of the German Empire, 
where the father died in 1873 and the mother in 1887. Louis F. Curdes 
attended the excellent schools of his native province until he was eleven 
years of age, and thereafter he continued his higher studies in the well 
ordered gymnasium at Warburg, Westphalia, and a similar institution at 
Hademar, in Hessen Nassau. At the age of sixteen years he came to 
the United States, and after passing a few months in the home of his 
sister, Mrs. Amelia Brown, at Defiance, Ohio, he came to Fort Wayne to 
visit another sister, Mrs. Mary Kriger, who died in childbirth only one 
week after his arrival in the city in which he was destined to gain prece- 
dence as a representative business man. After the death of his sister 
Mr. Curdes was here variously employed for several mouths, within which 
period he worked for the White Fruit House, the firm of K. B. Miller 
& Company, dealers in men's furnishings, and the book store of Sieman 
Brothers. In 1881 he entered the employ of the Packard Organ Company, 
with which he continued his association during the ensuing twelve years — 
or until the financial panic of 1893 brought about so great a curtailment 
of the company's business that he withdrew from its employ. Ambitious 
and self-reliant, he carefully consulted ways and means and finally estab- 
lished himself in the real estate business, his early sales having been made 



ASTOK, Lti- ' 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 121 

on a commission basis. His indomitable energy and honorable methods 
so expanded his business that in 1895 he was enabled to engage in buying 
and selling real estate in an independent way. His first venture under 
these conditions was that of purchasing nineteen lots in the Ewings Grove 
addition to Fort Wayne, and he was successful in exploiting and selling 
these properties advantageously. A year or so later he bought one hun- 
dred lots in the Industrial Park addition, and, with increasing confidence 
and characteristic circumspection, he later amplified operations by the 
purchase of sixty lots in the Swinney addition. To Mr. Curdes is in large 
measure due the- splendid development of these properties and also of 
seven hundred and forty-four lots of which he assumed control in the 
beautiful Forest Park addition to the city. His activities have been in- 
sistent and cumulative and have included the development of Forest Park 
boulevard, the Driving Park addition, containing one hundred and five 
acres, and numerous smaller additions and subdivisions, including Weisser 
Park, the Driving Park addition likewise continuing its development 
under his effective supervision. Mr. Curdes has become one of the fore- 
most exponents of real estate interests in Fort Wayne and through his 
broad operations has shown his faith in the future growth and increasing 
prosperity of the metropolis and judicial center of Allen county. Con- 
cerning his admirable activities in his chosen sphere of enterprise the 
following pertinent statements have been written: "Mr. Curdes is a 
man of artistic temperament and talent, and has been able to visualize 
in his own mind the beautifying of a landscape that to others represented 
but shrub-covered, barren knolls, and some of Fort Wayne's most beauti- 
ful additions and charming drives are but the outgrowth of his planning. 
He has had and still retains the utmost confidence in the splendid future 
of Fort Wayne, and the additions which he has so successfully exploited 
have been planned not only for the present but also for the city that is 
to be." In politics Mr. Curdes is unwavering in his allegiance to the 
Republican party, he is an active and influential member of the Fort 
Wayne Commercial Club, and both he and his wife are communicants of 
<he German Lutkeran church. On June 18, 1885, was solemnized the 
n>arriage of Mr. Curdes to Miss Clara J. Harris, daughter of John Harris, 
a prosperous hardware merchant of Fort Wayne. Of the four children of 
this union Arnold G. W., and AValter L. are associated with their father 
in the real estate business; Herbert died at the age of ten months; and 
Helen L., the only daughter, now Mrs. Arthur W. Rose, is a popular factor 
in the younger social circles of her native city. 

Charles E. Dailey followed the blacksmith business in Leo, Cedar 
Creek township, from 1892 to 1915, when he retired from active labors 
and settled down to a life of comparative ease. He was born in Cedar 
Creek township on July 1, 1867, son of Samuel and Mary (McCrory) 
Dailey, both of Pennsylvania birth. They came to Allen county in about 
1846, locating on a wilderness farm in this township and there spent 
the remainder of their lives. The father died, in 1880, leaving a fine 
improved farm of one hundred acres, and the mother is now living 
quietly in Leo, Indiana. They were the parents of seven children. Wil- 
liam M. lives in Leo. Dora is the wife of C. L. Hollopeter, of Wooster, 
Ohio. Franklin met his death by accidental drowning. Charles E._ was 
the fourth child. Sarah became the wife of Samuel Souder, of Michigan. 
Nevada lives in Fort Wayne, and Abner is located in Grabill. Mr. Dailey 
stayed on the home farm up to the age of twenty-five years, when he 



122 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

went to St. Joe, Indiana, and there learned the trade of a blacksmith. 
He worked there for two years, then returned to Allen county and, 
settling in Leo, built and equipped a modern blacksmith shop, which he 
operated with all success until he retired, in 1915. Mr. Dailey was mar- 
ried on March 22, 1891, to Miss Nellie Maxfield, who was born in Leo, 
Indiana, and five children have been born to them. George, the eldest, 
is located in Detroit, Michigan, and the others — Marjorie, Ronald, Ada 
and June — are still in the parental home. Mr. Dailey is a Democrat, 
active in local politics, and was one of the township trustees from 1908 
to 1916. He is a Mason and a member of the Eastern Star, his wife also 
having membership in that branch of Masonry. 

John Dalman. — Not all men are permitted to order their lives exactly 
to their liking but they are the strong and worthy ones who make the 
best possible use of their powers and wrest from fate the fullest measure 
of success which conditions impose. He to whom this memoir is dedicated 
was a man who lived up to the maximum of his ideals and powers of 
achievement and his sturdy character, his ambition and his industry 
enabled him to win in his native country a secure vantage-place as a 
representative farmer and land-holder and as a citizen of more than 
ordinary influence, this latter assurance having been verified by his 
effective service as treasurer of Allen county, an office of which he con- 
tinued the incumbent four years, prior to which he had served nine years 
as trustee of Pleasant township. Mr. Dalman was born at Fort Wayne 
on October 13, 1843, and was the eldest of the four children — all sons — 
of Edwin and Mary (McNeir) Dalman, the former of whom was born in 
England and the latter in Ontario, Canada. The parents were numbered 
among the worthy pioneers of Allen county, and here they continued to 
reside until their death, the father having done his part in connection 
with the early stages of material and civic development and progress 
in this now favored section of the Hoosier state. The four sons, John, 
"William, Charles and Thomas, are all deceased. Mr. Dalman early learned 
the lessons of practical and productive industry, had confidence in his 
ability to achieve independence through individual effort, and at the age 
of twenty-one years took unto himself a young wife who was destined 
to be his loyal and devoted coadjutor and to aid him materially in the 
accomplishing of their ambitious purposes. At the time of his marriage 
he settled on a farm of eighty acres, in Pleasant township, and not a 
little of the true pioneer phase of agricultural development was touched 
by him in his initial labors as an agriculturist. Self-reliant and indefatig- 
able, he pressed steadily forward toward the goal of success, and at the 
time of his death was the owner of a valuable and well improved landed 
estate of two hundred and seven acres — all in Pleasant township. He 
did much to further the development and advancement of that fine section 
of Allen county, commanded the unqualified confidence and esteem of 
all who knew him and made his life count for good in its every relation. 
The farm property is still owned by his widow, who also owns and occu- 
pies one of the attractive residences of Fort Wayne, the same being at 
2732 Fairfield avenue, besides which she has other property, both country 
and city. There was nothing static or vacillating in the nature of Mr. 
Dalman, and he not only proved himself a worthy meniber of the world's 
noble army of productive workers but was also loyal and liberal as a 
citizen and well fortified in his convictions and opinions. He was a leader 
in the councils of the Democratic party in Allen county, and, as before 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 123 

stated, was called upon to serve in offices of significant public trust, 
including that of county treasurer. In the Masonic fraternity he re- 
ceived the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, he was affiliated 
also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he was a consistent 
and devout member of the Christian church, as is also his widow. The 
gracious marital companionship of Mr. and Mrs. Dalman covered a period 
of more than forty years, and the relations were severed only when the 
loved husband and father was summoned to the life eternal, on June 23, 
1905. On August 27, 1863, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Dalman 
to Miss Louisa Helle, who likewise was born and reared in Allen county 
and who is a daughter of the late Frederick and Charlotta (Pens) Helle, 
both natives of Germany, Mrs. Dalman being the youngest of their three 
children; Frederick and William both are deceased. In conclusion is 
given brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Dalman: 
Charlotta died in childhood; Jennie L. is the widow of Elgi Rich and 
resides in Fort Wayne; Merica E. is the wife of Howard Shordon, of 
Fort Wayne; Edwin F. is actively identified with business interests in 
Fort Wayne ; John W. is associated with the American Steel Foundries, 
in the city of Chicago; Mary Frances died at the age of two years; and 
Florence D. is the wife of Jesse Marquardt, of Los Angeles, California. 

William E. Dalman was one of eight children born to his parents, 
William and Rebecca (Osborne) Dalman, early and estimable citizens of 
Fort Wayne. The elder Dalman came from England as a young man, 
in 1833, and settled in the original Fort Wayne community, in the days 
of the old block house. He \^as a true pioneer, and he spent his remain- 
ing years in that locality. He was a shoemaker by trade, and served 
bis apprenticeship in England. He farmed some in Allen county, but 
for the most part gave his attention to the business of shoe-making, and 
enjoyed a good deal of well merited success in that work. The children 
born to William and Rebecca Dalman were James F., a resident of Fort 
Wayne; Charlotte Jane, deceased; Mary Rebecca, living in Wayne 
township ; Hanna A., the wife of John Corson ; Julia, of Fort Wayne ; 
W. E., the subject ; Agnes E., of Lagrange, and Matilda Luemma, who 
is deceased. W. E. Dalman had his schooling in Pleasant township, 
the family having lived on a farm there for a period of years in his 
boyhood, and he eventually came into possession of the home place 
there. In later years he came to own other farms, but the old home 
was always his headquarters. During his last years he lived retired from 
active farm life, after enjoying a generous measure of success in his 
chosen occupation. Mr. Dalman was a Republican in politics, as was 
his father before him, and he served his township in various official 
capacities. One office he filled was that of township assessor, and he 
served from 1896 to 1900. He was married on December 16, 1877, to 
Miss Mary Bradbury, a native daughter of Pleasant toAvnship, and tliey 
became the parents of eleven children. Edwin, the eldest, is a farmer 
and is located in Wayne township ; Albert is established in Fort Wayne 
and is connected with the City Light and Power Company there. Nellie 
is the wife of William Daffron of Pleasant township. Roy is engaged 
in farming in Pleasant township. Guy is also connected with the City 
Light and Power Company in Fort Wayne. Ida married William Ria, 
a farmer of La Porte county. Arthur is the third of the family to be 
identified in an industrial way with the Fort Wayne Light and Power 
Company. The Dalman family is prominent and popular in Pleasant town- 



124 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

ship, and they are likewise well known in Fort Wayne, where various 
members of the family have identified themselves with the business 
world, and where numerous representatives of the family of a prceding 
generation are also to be found. 

Rev. Henry Paul Dannecker. — In 1890 the Rev. Henry Paul Danneck- 
er came to Fort Wayne to take charge of St. John's Parish of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran church. He has continued in that position to the 
present time, and the development of the parish in the past twenty-five 
years has been a credit alike to the pastor and to the community. The 
church was established on October 2, 1853. An unpretentious frame 
building was erected and at the same time they established a parochial 
school. The little church prospered and in 1861 the old frame structure 
was razed and a new and more modern building took its place. Again, 
in 1881, improvements were in order, and a fine brick structure took the 
place of the preceding frame building. Hand in hand with the growth 
of the church proper, the parochial school made sturdy development, and 
the present fine brick school that serves the parish was built in 1897. 
Three teachers are required to handle an attendance of 150 pupils and 
the standards of the school are most creditable. The first pastor of the 
church was Rev. Christian Hochstetter and the first teacher in the school 
was William Burger. Since those early days five pastors have served the 
parish. The second was A. Kleingees, who came in 1854 and served 
until 1857. He was followed by Hugo B. Kuhn, who served until 1861, 
and was replaced by E. Bauman, whose service continued until 1868. 
In that year Johannes Kucher came and remained for twenty-one years, 
and in 1890 the present pastor, Henry Paul Dannecker, assumed charge 
of the parish, which numbers about 350 families. His services have 
continued over a period of more than a quarter of a century, and the 
improvements that have marked his pastorate have been many and 
varied. St. John's is the second Lutheran church of the city, and with 
Grace Church is connected with the Ohio Joint Synod. Rev. Henry 
Paul Dannecker was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on March 22, 1860, and is 
a son of Frank and Fredericka (Koch) Dannecker, both of German birth. 
The mother comes from Wuertemburg and the father from Baden, 
Germany. When Frank Dannecker came to America he located first in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and remained there for several years. He married 
there and there the subject was born. When Henry Dannecker was 
about seven years old the family moved to Delphos, Ohio, and there 
the father worked at his trade as a cooper. There were three children — 
Clara, Henry Paul, and Max, of Van Wert, Ohio. Henry Paul Dannecker 
had his education in the public schools of Delphos, Ohio, and there 
learned the printer's trade, at which he worked for three years. He 
then entered Capital University at Columbus, Ohio, spending four years 
in study and was graduated in 1881. He engaged in teaching then and 
spent a year as instructor in a Lutheran parochial school at Youngs- 
town, Ohio, after which he entered the theological seminary at Capital 
University and was graduated in 1885. He was ordained at New Wash- 
ington, Ohio, and his first pastorate was at that place, where he spent 
five years in worthy service. He was then called to Fort Wayne to take 
charge of St. John's Parish, where he has since continued as has been 
stated above. Rev. Mr. Dannecker was married on January 14, 1886, to 
Miss Catherine Schneider, the daughter of AVilliam and Catherine (Bach- 
man) Schneider, of Genoa, Ohio. Nine children have been born to them. 
Theodore, the eldest, has followed in his father's ways and is now 



/ j-^rri-^ 






^^a 



'f^MI 



'^■I, 




HUGH M. DEIHL 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 125 

serving as assistant pastor of the church at Marysville, Ohio. Clara 
is the wife of Otto Sauertig, of Fort Wayne. Anna is deceased. Freda, 
Luther, Paul, Henry and Catherine are still under the parental roof ; 
and oue died in infancy. Mrs. Dannecker's parents were natives of 
Hessen Castle, Germany, and they came to the United States in 1871, 
locating in Genoa, Ohio. He was a forester in his homeland, but had 
retired from service before coming to America, and he was not engaged 
in active business pursuits after settling in Genoa. Both he and his 
wife are deceased. Rev. and Mrs. Dannecker have two grandchildren — 
Marguerite and Marian — the daughters of their eldest son, Theodore. 

William Decker is another of the native sons of the fine old Hoosier 
state who has here found ample scope and opportunity for successful 
achievement in connection with the basic industries of agriculture and 
stock-growing, and he is consistently to be designated as one of the 
representative farmers of Maumee township, where he has maintained 
his residence since the autumn of 1893 and where he is the owner of a 
splendidly improved farm of ninety acres. Mr. Decker has shown his 
progressiveness not only in bringing the farm up to high standard of 
productiveness but also in the making of the best of permanent improve- 
ments, including the erection of one of the best farm residences in the 
township, the building of good fences and the installing of tile drainage. 
He takes loyal interest in community affairs, is a Democrat in politics and 
he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church. Mr. Decker 
was born in Adams county, Indiana, on September 14, 1862, and is a son 
of Frederick and Mary (Comar) Decker, the former a native of Germany 
and the latter of Switzerland. The parents came to America in 1852, 
the voyage having been made on an old-time sailing vessel and thirteen 
weeks having elapsed ere it reached its destination. Frederick Decker 
came to Indiana soon after his arrival in the United States and for a 
time drove mules on the old Wabash and Erie canal. Later he obtained 
a tract of land in Adams township, where he reclaimed and improved 
a good farm and he and his wife are now numbered among the venerable 
pioneer citizens of Adams county, he having celebrated his eighty-fourth 
birthday anniversary in 1917. Of the five children the subject of this 
sketch is the eldest and he is the only son, the names of his sisters being 
here indicated in the respective order of birth : Louisa, Sophia, Anna 
and Mary. William Decker gained in his boyhood and youth a goodly 
quota of valuable and invigorating discipline in connection with the 
work of the home farm, and in the meanwhile he did not fail to profit 
by the advantages afforded in the public schools of his native county. 
He continued to be associated with the work and management of his 
father's farm until his removal to Allen county, and here, as previously 
stated, he has won for himself a large measure of success in connection 
with his vigorous operations as a farmer and stock-grower. On January 
27, 1888, Mr. Decker wedded Miss Elaine Buuck, who likewise was born 
and reared in Adams county, and who is a daughter of Louis and Louisa 
Buuck, early settlers of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Decker became the 
parents of five children : Paulina is the wife of John Korte, a successful 
farmer in Milan township ; Rudolph and Amy remain at the parental 
home ; Nora died at the age of seventeen days, and the youngest child, 
a son, died in infancy, 

Hugh M. Delhi, whose death occurred in Fort Wayne on August 8, 
1913, was a resident of this city for more than half a century, and he 
walked the path of life with the great simplicity and strength that ever 



126 , BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

prove an inspiration to honesty and worthy endeavor, the while he was 
ever loyal to high ideals and was an intuitive optimist and humanitarian. 
In a quiet and unassuming way he played well his part on the stage of 
life, and it is but consistent that in this history of the city and county 
that so long represented his home there shall be entered a tribute to his 
memory. Not the least of the honors that were his were those gained 
through loyal service as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war, 
and his patriotism was reinforced by the knowledge that though 
he was of staunch German lineage he ^\as a member of a family that 
was founded in America prior to the war of the Revolution, his parents 
having passed their entire lives in Pennsylvania and he himself having 
been born in the city of Philadelphia, on October 23, 1845. He was a 
son of Charles and Margaret (Martin) Deihl, and concerning the otheT* 
children the following brief data are available : Mary is the wife of 
John Smith, of Philadelphia; Charles likewise resides in that city; 
Peter was the next in order of birth ; Mrs. Ella Scott still maintains her 
home in Philadelphia, as do also Margaret, who is the widow of Joseph 
Test, and Agnes, who is the youngest of the surviving children; Sarah 
is deceased. While attending the schools of Philadelphia, Hugh M. 
Deihl heard his country's call to the defense of the union, and he suc- 
ceeded, though but sixteen years of age, in being accepted for service 
in the Union army. He first enlisted for a term of ninety days as a 
member of a Pennsylvania regiment of infantry, and, after the expiration 
of his original term, he re-enlisted, his service having continued during 
practically the entire period of the war, and his valor and fidelity having 
brought about his promotion to the office of captain. In later years 
he manifested his abiding interest in his old comrades by means of his 
appreciative affiliation "with the Grand Army of the Republic. Directly 
after his war service, Mr. Deihl joined the ranks of the world's productive 
workers by entering upon an apprenticeship to the trade of machinist. 
Then he came west, and, after remaining in the city of Chicago for a 
brief period, he came to Fort Wayne and found employment in the shops 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, his fine mechanical ability mak- 
ing him a skilled and valued employe who commanded substantial com- 
pensation for his services. He continued with the railroad company in 
the Fort Wayne shops for a long period of years and thereafter served 
thirteen years as chief of the police department of Fort Wayne — an 
office in which his long incumbency best demonstrates the efficiency 
of his administration, as well as the high popular estimate placed upon 
him as a man and a public official. He finally resigned his position as 
head of the police department and returned to the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, with which he continued his connection 
until the time of his death. Mr. Deihl's entire life was guided and 
governed by the highest principles, his buoyant nature found expression 
in kindly words and kindly deeds, and he drew to himself the most loyal 
of friends among all classes. His political allegiance was given to the 
Democratic party, he was prominently affiliated with the time-honored 
Masonic fraternity, in which he received the Knights Templars degrees 
and also the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, as well as those 
of the Mystic Shrine. He took deep interest in the affairs of the local 
post of the Grand Army of the Republic and was one of its most popular 
members. He was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and for many years prior to his death had been a zealous member of the 
First Presbyterian church, in which his widow still holds membership. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 127 

Shortly after coming to Fort Wayne he was married to Miss Ada Romelia 
Jones, who was born at Lockport, New York, and who is a representative 
of an old and honored family of the Empire state. She is a daughter 
of the late Thomas and Nancy (Guernsey) Jones, and the latter's father, 
Hon. John Guernsey, served as a member of the state senate of New 
York, as well as a representative in the United States congress. Mrs. 
Deihl is the eldest in a family of three children, Fannie J., being the 
second and John having died at the age of sixteen years. AVhen the 
silver cord of long and devoted companionship was loosed by the death 
of Mr. Deihl his widow found the greatest measure of consolation and 
compensation in the gracious memories of the loving association that 
had been theirs and of all that he had represented as husband and father. 
Mrs. Deihl resides at 525 East Berry street, where she delights to extend 
welcome to her many friends. Mr. and Mrs. Deihl became the parents 
of two daughters and one son : Lillie is the wife of Hon. James M. 
Robinson, of Fort Wayne, and Alice M. remains with her widowed 
mother. 

Rev. Joseph F. Delaney, pastor of St. Patrick's Catholic church in 
Fort Wayne, was born January 15, 1860, at Thompsonville, Conn. He 
was one of six children born to John and Mary Delaney, the former of 
whom was a native of Roscrea, County Tipperary, and the latter of the 
parish of Den, County Cavin, Ireland. His classical and philosophical 
courses were made at the Niagara Universitj^, after which he entered St. 
Francis' Seminary, Milwaukee. His death breaking after one year, he 
was sent to St. Vincent's Seminary, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he 
completed his theology. He was ordained priest in the Cathedral at 
Fort Wayne, by Bishop Dwenger, June 29, 1887. He received his ap- 
pointment, July 17, as assistant to Very Rev. J. H. Brammer, V. G., 
at the Cathedral. Two years later he succeeded the Rev. T. M. Leary 
as pastor of St. Patrick's church. He was named irremovable rector by 
Bishop Alerding and is a Diocesan Consultor. 

David Dennis. — The dignity of labor raises the farmer to a level 
of importance that corresponds favorably with that occupied by any 
class of producers. To labor long and faithful years, giving the best 
of one's ability and talent along any line of endeavor, is to rightly 
fulfill the destiny of mankind and to make possible a happy and content- 
ed age. David Dennis, one of the substantial farmers and highly es- 
teemed citizens of Lafayette township, is a man whose life has been one 
of constant industry and honorable labor, and though busy about his 
own affairs at all times, he has never lacked the time to identify himself 
with the social life of his neighbors or to contribute of his means to the 
advancement and w^elfare of his community. He is not a Hoosier by 
birth, but claims Guernsey, Ohio, as his place of nativity. He was born 
there on January 1, 1829, and he was seven years of age when the family 
moved to Monroe county, Ohio, where he continued to be identified 
with the home life of the family until he was twenty-four years old. 
His parents were farmers and he had a vigorous and valuable training 
in the elements of successful farming, so that when he launched out 
on his own responsibility he was ready to move on to success and inde- 
pendence without passing through the harrowing experiences that beset 
the early years of many young farmers. It was in 1853 when he left 
his native state and made the somewhat difficult journey across country 
to Allen county, Indiana. He drove the entire distance, having a light 
camping outfit and such equipment as was necessary for such a trip. 



128 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

and arriving in Lafayette township he bought a "forty" of uncleared 
land, grubbed out a space for a small log cabin and applied himself 
diligently to the business of making a home for himself and his little 
family in a new and practically undeveloped district. After some fifteen 
years of close application to the business in hand, Mr. Dennis had cleared 
every inch of the land and it was in excellent shape. He sold it to good 
advantage and bought another farm, this time an eighty-acre place, and 
it is on that place he is living to-day. It is one of the well developed 
and highly productive farms of the township and reflects a good deal of 
credit upon the industry and energy of its owner. Mr. Dennis was 
married on January 28, 1850, while yet a resident of Ohio, to Miss 
Elizabeth Bolinger. Nine children were born to them. They were 
named John, Blanda, Barbara, Marion, Ida Catherine, Ralph D., Mar- 
garet, Mary and Edward. The only ones living are Blanda and Edward, 
the latter of whom lives in New Haven. All were married and reared 
families, who in turn have families of their own, so that at the present 
writing Mr. Dennis has sixteen grandchildren and eighteen great-grand- 
children. Mrs. Dennis passed away on September 28, 1916, and is buried 
in Zanesville. 

William H. Dennis — Members of this well known family have been 
conspicuously identified with the development of Allen county and its 
agricultural resources during the past seventy-five years, and it is 
eminently fitting that some mention be made of them in a publication 
of the nature of this one. Their activities have been praiseworthy to 
a degree and William H. Dennis has ably carried on the work his father 
began in 1843, when he first came to Allen county as a pioneer from 
Pennsylvania. The subject was born on October 22, 1857, and his parents 
were Jacob and Nancy (Hickman) Dennis, both of Pennsylvania birth 
and parents. They came from their native state to Indiana in 1843 and 
settled in Allen county, buying a farm of one hundred acres in Lafayette 
township, which has since been the center of the family labors and 
accomplishments. Their early life on this new land was fraught with 
many difficulties incident only to pioneer life, and residents of the 
community of the present generation have little realization of what it 
meant to their parents to establish homes in ■what is to-day a well-settled 
and thriving district. Jacob Dennis prospered with the passing years 
and added land to his holdings from time to time, so that he was excel- 
lently equipped to carry on diversified farming on a fairly large scale 
during the later years of his life. He was a prominent man in his 
community and served as justice of the peace for many years in Lafayette 
township. He was generally kno^vvn as "Squire" Dennis among his 
associates and his standing in town and county was a creditable one. He 
was a life-long member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as was also 
his wife, who was one of the most estimable women of her day in La- 
fayette township, and who is still remembered for her many excellent 
qualities of heart and mind. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis reared a family of 
twelve children, four of whom are deceased, and the others are filling 
useful places in their various communities. Named in the order of their 
appearance they are Barbara Ell, who married Amos Busch and is 
deceased; Martha Anna, the wife of Adam Buscher, of Fort Wayne; 
John M., who died young; David C, a resident of Roanoke; Mary B., 
the wife of Nelson Bart, of Fort Wayne ; Elizabeth, who is deceased, was 
the wife of Taylor Bell, and he also is no longer living; William H, is 
the subject of this review ; Albert is deceased ; Jacob is a Lafayette town- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 129 

ship farmer; Alice married Fred Pence, of Huntington; Susan became 
the wife of Newton Darr; Frank R., lives in Lima, Ohio. William H. 
Dennis was born in Lafayette township and he had his schooling in 
the public schools his community afforded. Until 1882, when he was 
about twenty-five years old, he stayed on the farm home, helping in the 
management of that place, and then, having married, he branched out 
for himself. He bought a place of eighty acres in his native community, 
settled down to independent farming, and from that time his success was 
assured. He has prospered with the passing years, adding gradually 
to his land holdings, and to-day has one of the fine farms of the township, 
where he carries on a progressive and remunerative variety of farming. 
He has devoted a good deal of special attention to the breeding of 
Chester White hogs, Durham cattle, Shropshire sheep and Norman and 
Belgian horses, and the live stock produced on his place is well known 
for its general quality. Many improvements have been instituted on the 
farm in the past few years, and a new house and fine barns lately 
acquired speak definitely of a substantial prosperity that is the aim and 
ambition of every successful farmer. Mr. Dennis is interested in the 
Farmers State Bank of Roanoke as a stockholder and at the present time 
is a member of the township advisory board. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics, but does not let his political convictions interfere with his local 
duty as a citizen. He was married in 1882 to Alice Smalts, daughter of 
George and Elizabeth Smalts, and they are the parents of four children. 
Stella and Roy are at home. Celeste is at Fort Wayne and Media is the 
wife of Jewel Wickliff of Zanesville, Indiana. She has two children, 
Keith L. and Floyd D. 

Robert W. T. DeWald. — From an early stage in its history the city 
of Fort Wayne has been favored in enlisting men of energy, enterprise, 
strong initiative and sterling character in the furtherance of civic, in- 
dustrial and commercial advancement, and in insuring such cumulative 
precedence there are certain names that are specially prominent and 
honored in the city's history. Such distinction specially applies to the 
family of DeWald, and one of the most substantial and important com- 
mercial enterprises of the city at the present time is that represented 
in the extensive business controlled by the wholesale dry-goods corpora- 
tion of The George DeWald Company, the history of the concern cover- 
ing a period of nearly three-fourths of a century, so that it is consistently 
to be designated as one of the pioneer business houses of the Allen county 
metropolis. Developed along normal and legitimate lines and built up 
definitely upon honor, the business has stood creditable alike to those 
who have been in control of the same and also to the city in which its 
headquarters have been maintained. This representative house has been 
a leader in commercial and industrial progress in Fort Wayne and in 
the general annals of the city few names have been more notably and 
M^orthily conspicuous as exemplifying civic loyalty and impressive busi- 
ness progressiveness. Robert W. T. DeWald, president of the corpora- 
tion of The George DeWald Company, was born March 7, 1862, and the 
place of his nativity was the old family homestead that stood on a now 
vacant lot adjoining the Fort Wayne postoffice building. His father, 
George DeWald, was born in Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, on May 14, 
1831, and acquired his early education in his native land. At the age 
of eighteen years he came to America and after remaining for a time 
in the states of New York and Ne\^' Jersey he came to Indiana and 
became one of the representative young business men of Fort Wayne, 



130 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

where he passed the residue of his life and where his death occurred 
June 27, 1899. In the old Catholic cathedral that stood on the site of 
the present Library Hall, his marriage to Mrs. Sophia Angeline Nett- 
horst was solemnized February 10, 1861, when he was twenty-nine years 
of age. His wife was a representative of one of the oldest and most 
distinguished families of this section of Indiana, her father, Francis 
D. LaSalle, having been of French lineage and a scion of the historic 
and partician old family of LaSalle : he came in an earlj'' day to old 
Fort Wayne, where he served as paymaster to the Indians, and it is a 
matter of historic record that he took a prominent part in conducting 
the Indians from the settlement when the government made provision 
for them elsewhere. In 1849 George DeWald engaged in the retail dry- 
goods business in a modest way, and it is specially interesting to note that 
his original store was on the site of the fine building now owned and 
occupied by the large wholesale dry-goods house that perpetuates his 
name. In the early years he was associated in business with Robert 
Wade Townley and Jonas Townley, who were succeeded by Townley, 
DeWald and Bend, but eventually he gained sole control of the business 
and established the firm of George DeWald & Company, this title 
having since been retained and the concern having been incorporated 
within a short time after his death. He continued to be actively identi- 
fied with the business until the close of his life, and the enterprise was 
continued exclusively along retail lines until the establishment was de- 
stroyed by fire, December 27, 1899, about six months subsequently to 
the death of the honored founder. George DeWald was a man of fine 
character and much ability. In his business affairs he was the sturdy 
exponent of progress, and the same held good in his attitude as a loyal 
and broad-minded citizen. His interest in Fort AVayne was not merely 
one of sentiment but was manifested in liberality and constructive 
energy. He did much for the advancement of the city and at all times 
held to the highest civic ideals. He was essentially a business man and 
thus had no desire to enter the arena of practical politics, though he 
was a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party. He and 
his wife continued their membership in the Cathedral parish of the 
Catholic church until the founding of St. Patrick's church, when they 
transferred their membership to this parish, the church edifice being 
situated on DeWald street, which was named in honor of this sterling 
pioneer merchant. Mrs. DeWald passed her entire life in Fort Wayne 
and this revered and gracious gentlewoman was summoned to the "land 
of the leal" in 1906. Of the children Robert W. T., of this review, is 
the eldest ; Mary E. is the wife of James A. McDonald, and they main- 
tain their home at LaGrange, a suburb of the city of Chicago ; Caroline 
L. is the wife of Henry J. Beuret, of Fort Wayne; Miss Elizabeth M. 
resides in Fort Wayne, her home being on the site of the old DeWald 
Square, which was named for her father; George L. is vice-president of 
The George DeWald Company. . Robert W. T. DeWald acquired his 
youthful education in the parochial and public schools of Fort Wayne 
and, in 1876, when about fifteen years of age, he initiated his practical 
training with his father's retail mercantile business. In 1888 he was 
admitted to partnership, and he has continued his active alliance with 
the business during the intervening years — a resourceful and valiant 
force in the development of the large and important enterprise now con- 
ducted by the incorporated concern of The George DeWald Company. 
After the disastrous fire that destroyed the firm's retail store, in the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 131 

winter of 1899, Mr. DeWald effected a prompt reorganization of the 
business, and the company "was incorporated in January, 1900, under 
the present title. He became president of the corporation and has con- 
tinued as its chief executive, his brother being vice-president of the 
company and William P. Beck being its secretary and treasurer. The 
wholesale business of The George DeWald Company had its inception 
in 1900, and the trade of the house, represented by eight traveling sales- 
men, now extends over a broad territory in Indiana, Ohio and Michigan. 
Mr. DeWald has not only been one of the prime factors in the upbuilding 
of this substantial and important commercial enterprise in his native 
city, but has also given capitalistic and executive co-operation in the 
upbuilding of other representative business institutions of Fort Wayne. 
He is vice-president and a member of the executive board of the People's 
Trust & Savings Company, is a director of the German American 
National Bank and the German American Trust Company, and is a 
member of the directorate of the Fort Wayne Morris Plan Bank, the 
Wayne Oil Tank and Pump Company and the Commercial Investment 
Company. He is an active and valued member of the Fort Wayne Com- 
mercial Club and the Rotary Club, besides being affiliated with the local 
Country Club. In politics Mr. DeWald gives his allegiance to the Dem- 
ocratic party and both he and his wife are communicants of Catholic 
Cathedral. On June 25, 1889, Avas solemnized the marriage of Mr. De- 
Wald to Miss Mollie Henebery, a daughter of Matthew and Mary Hene- 
bery, her father being a prominent merchant and banker at Peoria, 
Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. DeWald have no children. 

Daniel W. DeWitt, long a resident of Lafayette township and one 
of the well established men of the community, was born in Delaware 
county, Indiana, July 28, 1833. He is a son of Daniel and Rebecca (Thorn- 
burg) DeWitt, who came to Indiana from Mercer county, Kentucky, and 
were farmers all their lives, practically. The elder DeWitt was a soldier 
in the War of 1812. In 1848 he came to Allen county, bought land and 
settled down to the unromantic business of founding a home in the wilds 
of what later came to be Lafayette township. He was an old-time Whig 
and later a Republican, and through all his life was a substantial factor 
in the development of those communities with which he found himself 
identified. To him and his wife were born a family numbering sixteen 
sons and daughters. Daniel DeWitt was reared in Huntington and Dela- 
ware counties and had his education in the schools of the communities 
wherein he had his residence. The schools were of the primitive type, 
peculiar to the day, and educations derived within them were meagre 
indeed. The boy grew up with a thorough working knowledge of 
farming and was twenty-eight years old when he left the shelter of the 
family roof tree and turned his attention to independent farming. His 
first purchase was a tract of fourteen acres, which formed the nucleus 
of his present comfortable place. There was not an acre of cleared land 
on it, and he began his private career with as little of material resources 
as a farmer boy ever set out with, it is safe to say. His first cabin home, 
built in 1860, had no windows, and they lived in it for some time before 
a door was hung. But with the passing years Mr. DeWitt achieved real 
independence and is today one of the most successful men of his town- 
ship. He was married on February 10, 1860, to Mary Jaxe Haekett, and 
she bore one son, Don W., who is at present running the home farm, and 
who is married and the father of three children — Audra Irene, Frances 



132 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Justine, and Ruth Elizabeth. Mrs. DeWitt died at a comparatively early- 
age and on December 1, 1886, Mr. DeWitt married Belinda Dennis, daugh- 
ter of David Dennis, concerning whose family extended mention will be 
found in other pages. Mr. DeWitt and his son are Republican in poli- 
tics, and both are leaders in their community. The father has been a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1872, and his son 
is also a member of that fraternal organization. 

Harry E. Dial. — "The Farm Man" needs no introduction to Allen 
county people, for in his capacity as dealer in farm lands, Harry E. Dial 
has made the acquaintance of practically the entire community. His 
operations extend through Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, and while he 
has not confined his real estate activities alone to the sale of farm prop- 
erties, he specializes in that particular field, and is known as "The 
Farm Man" to a large and ever-growing clientele. Mr. Dial is a firm 
believer in the efficiency of printer's ink, and is prepared to vouch for 
the truth of the well-known saying, "It Pays to Advertise." He was 
always more or less interested in farms and farming, and his first inde- 
pendent venture was as a farmer. He abandoned his first enterprise for 
railroad work, but later returned to agricultural life, and continued in 
it until he came to Fort Wayne in 1912. In that year he established 
a real estate business in the city, and he has enjoyed a gratifying meas- 
ure of success in his work. Mr. Dial is a family man, and his marriage 
to Miss Marion Herr took place in 1894, They have three children — 
Duayne, Harry, Jr., and Sulvia. 

William A. Diffenderfer has been a resident of Allen county since 
he was a lad of seven years and through his own ability and well directed 
endeavors has become a prominent figure in connection with the more 
important business interests of Fort Wayne, where he is now treasurer 
of the Mossman & Yarnelle Company, a prominent concern here 
engaged as jobbers in carriages and wagon materials and auto acces- 
sories, and where he is also secretary and treasurer of the Wayne Spoke 
& Bending Company, another of the important industrial corporations 
of the Allen county metropolis. Mr. Diifenderfer was born at Mount 
Sterling. Van Buren county, Iowa, on October 25, 1857, and in the schools 
of the Keystone state he gained his rudimentary education, his parents 
having been numbered among the pioneers of Van Buren county, Iowa, 
He is a son of Benjamin 0. and Isabella (Alcorn) Diffenderfer, his father, 
a native of Pennsylvania and a machinist by trade, having gone to Iowa 
in the pioneer days, returning to Pennsylvania in 1858, and having 
there remained until 1865, when he came with his family to Allen county, 
where he and his wife passed the residue of their lives and where he 
was long employed at his trade in the Fort Wayne shops of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad. He was a sterling citizen who had inviolable place 
in popular confidence and good will and both he and his wife were 
zealous members of the Third Presbyterian church of Fort Wayne, in 
which he held official position for fully a quarter of a century. Of the 
two children the subject of this sketch is the elder, and Mary is the 
wife of James B. Stewart, of Coffeyville, Kansas. As previously inti- 
mated, William Diffenderfer was about seven vears old at the time of 
the family removal to Fort Wayne, and here he continued his studies 
in the public schools until he had completed the curriculum of the high 
school, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1876. There- 
after he proved the basic value of his cholarship by serving a short period 
as a representative of the pedagogic profession, he having achieved sue- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 133 

cessful work as a teacher in the district schools of Monroe township. 
Thereafter he devoted three years to the study of law, in the otfice of 
the late Judge Colerick, of Fort Wayne, and in 1879 took a position of 
clerical and executive order in the office of Coombs & Company, en- 
gap-ed in the heavy hardware business in Fort Wayne. This alliance 
continued a short time when he became associated with the Mossman 
& Yarnelle Company, with which he has since continued his connection 
and in which he has become a prominent stockholder. He has aided 
materially in the furtherance of the company's business and has been 
treasurer of this well known and representative corporation since 1908. 
Though he has had no ambition for political preferment Mr. Diffender- 
fer gives loyal allegiance to the Democratic party and he takes lively 
interest in public affairs, especially those of his home city and county. 
In the Masonic fraternity he has received the thirty-second degree of 
the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Third Presbyterian church. In November, 1895, Mr. Diffenderfei 
wedded Miss Blanche Davis, and she passed to the life eternal September 
20, 1897, the one surviving child of this union being Davis A., who is 
attending the University of Michigan. On November 10, 1909, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Diffenderfer to Mrs. Harriet M. Riblet, of 
Fort Wayne. No children have been born to the second marriage. 

J. Frank Dinnen, M. D., is established in the successful practice of 
his profession in his native city of Fort Wayne and is giving special atten- 
tion to the surgical branch of his profession. Bringing to bear the results 
of thorough technical training as well as resolute purpose and perhaps 
inherited predilection, he has gained assured place as one of the able 
and representative physicians and surgeons of the younger generation 
in Allen county, his father having long been one of the leading medical 
practitioners in Fort Wayne. Dr. James Frank Dinnen was born in Fort 
Wayne on October 25, 1884, a son of Dr. James M. and Catherine (Flem- 
ming) Dinnen. Dr. James Dinnen was born in Clermont county, Ohio, 
and was fourteen months old at the time of his parents' removal to the 
city of Chicago, where he was reared and educated and his professional 
education was acquired in the celebrated Rush Medical College, from 
which he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. He has been engaged 
in the practice of his profession in Fort Wayne for many years, is known 
as one of the most skillful surgeons in northern Indiana and in late years 
has concentrated his energies largely in the surgical department of pro- 
fessional service. His wife is a representative of one of the honored 
and influential pioneer families of Allen county, and her father, the late 
William Flemming, was at one time very prominent in connection with 
political and general civic affairs in the county, as well as a figure of 
influence as a capitalist and financier Dr. Dinnen of this review is the 
youngest in a family of nine children, and the eldest of the number is 
William, who is now a representative member of the bar of South Bend, 
this state ; Helen remains at the parental home ; the next younger daugh- 
ter is Sister Mary Adele, of the Order of the Sacred Heart ; Josephine re- 
mains with her parents in Fort Wayne ; John Richard is a civil engineer 
in the service of the Nickel Plate Railroad; and George, Robert and 
Charles all reside in Fort Wayne. Dr. J. Frank Dinnen acquired his early 
education in the parochial and public schools and thereafter attended 
in turn the great Notre Dame University, at South Bend, and the Univer- 
sity of Indiana, at Bloomington. In the city of Chicago he completed a 



134 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

course in the medical department of the University of Illinois, in which 
he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Thereafter 
he gained valuable clinical experience through two years of service as an 
interne in St. Elizabeth Hospital, in Chicago, and since September 1, 
1909, has been engaged in the practice of his profession at Fort Wayne. 
The Doctor is serving as a member of the staff of surgeons of the Nickel 
Plate, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, and the Lake Erie & West- 
ern Railroads, as well as being retained in similar capacity by all of the 
traction lines entering or centered in Fort Wayne. He is affiliated with 
the American Medical Association, the Indiana State Medical Society, the 
Allen County Medical Society and the American Association of Railway 
Surgeons. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church. 

Frank J. Dix has not been denied the rewards that should attend 
effective service and distinct technical and executive ability, for he has 
won advancement to the responsible office of general superintendent of 
the City Light & Power Company of Fort Wayne, of which position 
he has been the valued incumbent since July 1, 1908. Mr. Dix claims 
Fort AVayne as the place of his nativity, his birth having here occurred 
on October 4, 1866, He is a son of Seth and Esther (Bolger) Dix, who 
are now venerable and highly honored citizens of this place. Seth Dix 
was born at Elyria, Ohio, and was a lad of nine years at the time of the 
family removal to Fort Wayne, where he was reared to adult age and 
where he gained his education in the public schools of what may be 
termed the middle pioneer epoch in the history of the metropolis of 
Allen county. He eventually established a livery and transfer business 
in the city, and he conducted one of the pioneer hack lines of Fort 
Wayne, his association with this enterprise having continued for more 
than a quarter of a century. He has long been a stalwart in the local 
ranks of the Democratic party and he and his wife are earnest commu- 
nicants of the Fort Wayne cathedral parish of the Catholic church. 
Frank J. Dix had the fortuitous influences of the Catholic parochial 
schools of Fort Wayne in the acquiring of his early educational training, 
and as a young man he found employment as a locomtive fireman on 
the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, commonly known as the 
Nickel Plate Railroad. After being thus engaged about one year he 
entered the service of the Jenney Electric Light & Power Company 
of Fort Wayne, in the employ of which he continued from 1889 to 1908 
In the latter year he became chief electrician for the City Light & 
Power Company, and his ability eventually led to his being appointed 
general superintendent of this company, as has been previously noted. 
He has been circumspect and progressive in keeping this public-utility 
service up to the best modern standard and is one of the well-known 
and highly esteemed business men of his native city. In neither religion 
nor politics has he swerved from the faith in which he was reared, and 
thus he is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party, the while both he and his wife are communicants 
of the Catholic church. He is a member of the National Association of 
Municipal Electricians and the Rejuvenated Sons of Jove, is actively 
identified with the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, and is affiliated with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On February 8, 1893, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Dix to Miss Lulu Myer, daughter of 
Charles F. Myer, of Fort Wayne, and the two children of this union are 
Martha E. and Dorothy E., both of whom remain at the parental home. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 135 

Henry G. Doctor. — The family of which Henry G. Doctor is a repre- 
sentative in Marion township is one of the old established ones of the 
county, noted for its numbers quite as much as for its stability of charac- 
ter and general good citizenship. Mr. Doctor stands prominently among 
the retired men of his community, and after many years of strenuous 
endeavor in the pursuit of agriculture is now to be found living quietly 
amid the comforts won by his years of earnest effort. He has won the 
unqualified respect and confidence of his fellows and has not only enjoyed 
a long life of seventy years, but has made his years count for service 
to himself, his family and his community. Mr. Doctor was born January 
28, 1847, in Marion township, son of Charles and Louisa (Coleman) Doc- 
tor. The father came from Germany in young life, in company with his 
parents, who for a time resided in Pennsylvania. Later they removed 
to Indiana, making the journey with a one-horse wagon. This wagon 
carried the camp outfit and the women and children of the little party, 
and the men walked the entire distance. Roads were bad, and in many 
places the women dismounted and shared the road with the men folks. 
The journey was a long and difficult one, fraught with the manifold dan- 
gers that beset the path of the overland voyager of the day, but they 
came through safely and settled in Allen county. The men first found 
employment in a brick yard, but later Charles Doctor entered land from 
the government, and at the time of his death, in 1856, was the owner of 
one hundred and twenty acres of good farm land. To him and his wife 
were born six children : Margaret, Nathan, Henry G., Mary, William A., 
and Ellen. Henry G. Doctor was educated in the public schools of Marion 
township and spent his boyhood and young manhood on the home farm. 
He was still but a lad, eight years old, when his father died and he early 
learned to share the burdens that fell upon his mother's shoulders with 
the death of the head of the family. The old homestead has been his 
home practically all his life. After the death of his mother, in 1863, he 
bought the interests of the other heirs to the place and has since retained 
possession of it. He later purchased the old Nathan Coleman place, and 
lived on it for a number of years, but subsequently removed to the former 
home and resided there until he moved to Fort Wayne, in 1900, where 
he now lives. He has prospered well in his years of devotion to agricul- 
ture and is at this time the owner of 570 acres of land in Allen county 
and 304 acres in Paulding county, Ohio. He also owns a fine home in 
Fort Wayne, where he lives. Mr. Doctor is a Republican in politics and 
a member of the German Lutheran church. He was married, December 
26, 1865, to Miss Catherine Leydolph, daughter of Fred and Anna Ley- 
dolph, and they became the parents of eight children. Charles F. is 
deceased; Henry J. lives in Marion township, Elizabeth is the wife of 
William M. Brown, of Adams township. Allen is a farmer in Paulding 
county, Ohio. Mary married Fred Adam and they live in Adams town- 
ship, Allen county. Lewis also lives in Adams township. Anna is mar- 
ried to August Bearman, of Marion township. Lucy is the wife of Henry 
Koehlinger, also of Marion township. Twenty-nine grandchildren have 
been added to the family in more recent years. Charles F. had a goodly 
family of eight. They are Rosa, who is the wife of Frank Rice and the 
mother of a daughter and a son; Henry, Martha (wife of Victor Worm), 
Walter (deceased), Emma, May, Freda and Paul. Henry Doctor has 
five children, named Arthur, Delia, Elmer, Hulda and Elsie. Elizabeth's 
three areMelly, married to Ed Berman; Etta and Arthur. Allen has a 



136 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

son, Albert. Lewis has six sons — Arthur, Herbert, Willard, Irwin, Clar- 
ence and Walter. Anna is the mother of Elmer, Vera and Mildred, while 
Lucy has Velma, Paul and Berenice. These are fine young people of 
much promise, and Mr. and Mrs. Doctor may well be proud of the record 
of their lives when they contemplate the coming representatives of the 
name. 

Edward W. Dodez, D. D. S., is not only an able exponent of the 
profession that represents both a science and a mechanic art, but is 
also one who has made a valuable contribution to the dental profession 
as a manufacturer of dental remedies and specialties, including his 
widely-used "Oxpara," which has met with most favorable and well- 
merited reception and utilization on the part of the members of the 
profession all over the globe, and it is worthy of special note that it is 
used in the hospitals in the great war zone of Europe. The doctor has 
now virtually retired from the acti^'d practice of his profession, and is 
giving his exclusive attention to his well-established and cumulatively 
successful manufacturing enterprise, with well-equipped establishment 
at No. 1425 West Main street, in his native city of Fort Wayne. Dr. 
Edward Wright Dodez was born in Fort Wayne on March 11, 1875, a 
son of Gustave C. and Helen (Ketterer) Dodez. He attended the public 
schools of Fort Wayne and also the Westminster Seminary for a time, 
and in preparation for his chosen profession, entered the college of 
dentistry of the University of Illinois, this department being located in 
the city of Chicago. From this school he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1899, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, In 
the following year he engaged in the practice of his profession in Fort 
Wayne, and, by his ability, effective service and personal popularity, 
he built up a large and representative practice, the same continuing to 
engross his time and attention for about seven years, at the expiration 
of which time he retired from the active work of his profession to give 
his supervision to the manufacture of dental remedies and specialties — 
a line of enterprise in which his success is of a high order. The doctor 
is an active member of the Commercial Club of Fort Wayne. He is 
zealous in the support of its high ideals and the progressive policies 
of the organization, and is serving as a member of its directorate, besides 
which he is a charter member and one of the organizers of the Fort 
Wayne Rotary Club. He is a prominent member of the Masonic frater- 
nity. January 24, 1900, recorded the marriage of Dr. Dodez to Miss 
Lilla May Cramer, daughter of Jeremiah and Josephine (Harlow) 
Cramer, of Fairbury, Illinois, and of this union have been born four 
children, all of whom are living except the youngest, Lilla May, w^ho 
died in infancy. The cheery home circle includes the other children — 
Edward, Josephine and Helen, the daughters being twins. Westover, 
the beautiful suburban home of Dr. Dodez, on the Leesburg road, is one 
of the most attractive places in this vicinity. 

Henry J, Doswell, the able and honored superintendent of beautiful 
Lindenwood Cemetery at Fort Wayne, succeeded his father in this office, 
in which he has admirably upheld the prestige of the name which he 
bears, with technical ability and artistic talent that mark him as one 
of the representative landscape gardeners of his native state. It is a 
matter of historical interest to record that from the time Lindenwood 
Cemetery was platted it has been consecutively maintained under the 
supervision of the Doswells, the father of the present superintendent 
having assumed charge in 1859 and the beautiful "God's Acre" having 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 137 

been developed and improved under his able management and direction. 
When he passed to the life eternal, in 1900, he was succeeded by his son, 
Henry J., and the latter has given equally loyal, earnest and effective 
service, with the result that Lindenwood is consistently to be designated 
as one of the most beautiful cemeteries in the state of Indiana. Mr. 
Doswell was born in Fort Wayne on December 23, 1864, and is a son of 
John H. and Catherine J. (Humphries) Doswell, both natives of Eng- 
land, where they were reared and educated, the father having been 
born in the city of London, November 3, 1827, and the mother in Glou- 
cestershire, in April, 1825. In his youth John H. Doswell served a 
thorough apperticeship under the direction of an able and successful 
florist in his native land, and he so extended his experience as to gain 
distinctive ability as a landscape gardener and architect. For a time he 
was in the employ of W. D. Page, of Southampton, and thereafter he 
was retained four years as an assistant in the fine gardens of the Earl 
of Radnor, near Salisbury, in Wiltshire. Upon his retirement from this 
position he had the distinction and valuable privilege of being employed 
in the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, and later he was head gardener 
on the estate of Sir William Medlican, at Venhall, Somersetshire. In 
September, 1852, he immigrated to the United States, and he passed the 
first winter in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he had charge of the greenhouse 
of the late William Resor. From the Buckeye state he finally went to 
Wisconsin, where he purchased a farm and, as a pioneer of that common- 
wealth, turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In the autumn 
of 1859 he returned to Cincinnati, and in the following December 
came to Fort Wayne to assume charge of the newly established 
Lindenwood Cemetery, of which he became the first superintendent and 
landscape architect, the basic design and original beautifying oi the 
cemetery having been perfected' under his able direction and his earnest 
devotion and enthusiastic energy having been the principal medium 
through which the beautiful cemetery was developed to its present 
status. He loved his work and his stewardship was in consonance with 
his sincere and upright character and his appreciation of the sentimental 
value of his gracious endeavors. In addition to his work at Lindenwood 
he had charge also, in the summer of 1888, of laying out and initiating 
the improvement of all of the city park plats of Fort Wayne, and, all 
in all, the tangible results of his labors during th6 long years of resi- 
dence in Fort Wayne constitute a most consistent and enduring monu- 
ment to the memory of this sterling and honored citizen. The gentle and 
devoted wife of Mr. Doswell was summoned to eternal rest in July, 
1902, both having been devoted communicants of the Protestant Episco- 
pal church. Of their ten children seven are living, in 1917. Henry J. 
Doswell is indebted to the public schools of Fort Wayne for his early 
educational discipline, which was here supplemented by a course of 
study in the old Methodist College. He was signally favored in his 
youth in being permitted to perfect himself in landscape work under 
the able and punctilious direction of his father. He was given most 
careful training, showed a natural predilection for the work and finds 
satisfaction and pride in the fact that he was chosen the successor^ of 
his honored father as superintendent of Lindenwood Cemetery, he having 
been assistant to his father at the cemetery until the death of the latter, 
in 1900. Mr. Doswell has not limited his civic loyalty to his service 
in the line of his profession but takes deep interest in all things per- 
taining to the welfare and advancement of his native city. Pie planned 



138 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the landscape for Lakeside Park. His political allegiance is given to 
the Eepublican party. In Masonry he has received the thirty-second 
degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, 
his York Rite affiliation being with Fort Wayne Commandery of 
Knights Templars, and he is identified also with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. On September 
3, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Doswell to Miss Mary E. 
Taylor, who likewise was born and reared in Fort Wayne and who is a 
daughter of William C. and Mahala (Sudro) Taylor, the father being 
now a resident of California and the mother being deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Doswell have two children : Harold H. is successfully engaged in 
the manufacturing of cement burial caskets, in Fort Wayne, and Helen 
S, is the wife of Arthur E. Kover, of this city. 

Wallace E. Doud has in recent years been one of the most prominent 
and influential figures in connection with the well-ordered physical and 
civic development and upbuilding of Fort Wayne, and specially import- 
ant and valuable have been his real estate operations in the platting and 
exploiting of new additions and subdivisions that have inured greatly 
to the metropolitan advancement of the chief city of Allen county. 
Mr. Doud was born on a farm in Defiance county, Ohio, October 25, 
1858, and is a son of Linas P. and Clarinda A. (Barden) Doud. His 
father was born on the shores of beautiful Lake Champlain, in the state 
of Vermont, and was a scion of a sterling family that was foujided in 
New England in the colonial era. He established his home in Defiance 
county, Ohio, about the year 1840, and after having been identified with 
the mercantile business at Defiance about one year he purchased a farm 
about twelve miles northwest of the county seat, near the present village 
of Ney. He developed one of the fine farms of the county and was one 
of the leading citizens of his commnity, his death having occurred on 
his old homestead, in 1872, and his wife having survived him by nearly 
thirty years. Of their children, only three are now living: Frank E. 
and Mildred being still residents of the old Buckeye state and the sub- 
ject of this review being thus the only representative of the immediate 
family in Indiana. Wallace E. Doud was reared to the benignant and 
sturdy discipline of the farm and continued to attend school in his 
native county until he was sixteen years of age, when he proved himself 
eligible for pedagogic honors and began teaching in the district schools. 
Later he fortified himself more fully by a course in a normal college that 
was then established at Bryan, Ohio, and he continued his effective 
services as a teacher in the public schools until he had attained to the 
age of twenty-five years. He then became a representative of the Union 
Central Life Insurance Company, of Cincinnati, in the service of which 
he continued until 1894, when he resigned his position and came to 
Fort Wayne. Here he established an office in the Old National Bank 
building and engaged, with characteristic vigor and resourcefulness, in 
the real estate business, of which he has become one of the most influen- 
tial and successful representatives in Allen county. He retained his 
original office headquarters until the erection of the modern Shoaff 
building, when he removed to his present well appointed offices in this 
fine structure. More than a decade ago Mr. Doud began to specialize 
in the platting and placing on the market of well defined additions to 
the city of Fort Wayne, and it is in this field that his greatest achieve- 
ment has been made. He has sold thousands of lots and his transactions 
have aggregated millions of dollars, so that it may readily be seen that 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 139 

he has contributed greatly to the development and progress of his home 
city, while scrupulous integrity has marked his every transaction. Among 
the more recent additions that have been ably exploited and developed 
under the direction of Mr. Doud may be noted Pfeiffer Place, comprising 
nearly six hundred lots; Pontiac Place, with more than five hundred 
lots, and Calhoun Place, with more than one hundred lots. Mr. Doud 
was prominently concerned in the organization and incorporation of the 
City & Suburban Realty Company, the original capital stock of which 
was ten thousand dollars. The title of the corporation was later changed 
to the present form, the City & Suburban Building Company, and it 
now has a capital stock of one hundred and sixty thousand dollars, the 
while it is undoubtedly doing the leading building business of the city and 
its environs. Mr. Doud has held the dual office of treasurer and sales 
manager of this company from the time of its incorporation, and its 
offices are just across the corridor from the private office in which he 
conducts his individual real estate business. In the fall of 1916, Mr. 
Doud became one of the organizers of the Enterprise Building Company. 
This organization specializes in the erecting of homes which sell at a 
moderate price. A broad-guaged and progressive citizen, Mr, Doud is 
aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, 
though he has had neither time nor inclination for public office, and 
he holds membership in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, of the fine 
civic and commercial policies of which he is a loyal supporter. He is a 
director of the Fort Wayne Country Club, is affiliated with the local 
lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and has completed 
the circle of both York and Scottish Rite Masonry up to and including 
the reception of the thirty-second degree in the latter, besides being 
affiliated also with the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He and his wife are zealous members of the Wayne Street 
Methodist Episcopal church, and he is serving as president of its board 
of trustees. July 6, 1884, recorded the marriage of Mr. Doud to Miss 
Fannie J. Van Meter, daughter of Perry H. Van Meter, of Sherwood, 
Defiance county, Ohio, further reference to the family being made on 
other pages, in the sketch of the career of her brother. Homer L.~Van 
Meter, of Fort Wayne. Like her husband, Mrs. Doud was formerly a 
successful and popular teacher, and she was an assistant in the school 
of which he was superintendent at the time of their marriage. Mr. and 
Mrs. Doud have two children — Olive A., who is the wife of Raymond 
W. Ellis, a stock broker at Wilmington, Delaware, and Ethel I., who 
remains at the parental home. 

Frank Doughman — One of the prosperous farming men of Roanoke, 
who have added their full quota to the agricultural development of that 
community is Frank Doughman, born in Aboite township, Allen county, 
on February 17, 1869, and the son of Abraham and Sarah (Henderson) 
Doughman. The father was a Pennsylvanian by birth and he came to 
Allen county in his young manhood, in partnership with a twin brother, 
David D. Doughman, who had accompanied him to the west from their 
Pennsylvania home. They became the owners of a farm of 147 acres in 
Aboite township and were prosperous and prominent farming men there 
for many years. Abraham Doughman was a blacksmith by trade and 
gave some attention to that work throughout his lifetime. They retired 
from active life in their later years and were living quietly in the 
enjoyment of earlier labors at the time when death claimed them. The 
brothers were Democrats and were lifelong members of the Methodist 



140 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Episcopal church. Abraham and Sarah Doughman became the parents 
of five children. AVilliam, the first born, died in childhood. Newton 
passed away at the age of forty-nine, his death coming very suddenly. 
Louisa is the wife of William Clark of Aboite township. Clara married 
John Flaugh and lives in Jefferson township, Whitley county, Indiana. 
Frank, the youngest, is the subject of this sketch. He was educated in 
the public schools of his native community and divided his time between 
his books and the more practical education incident to life on a farm. He 
had a commendable training in agriculture and when he left home and 
branched out for himself he rented a farm and applied himself to the 
task of accumulating sufficient to enable him to become a landowner. 
Later he bought his present homestead of eighty acres and there he has 
lived in the successful management of the place. Progressive methods 
have marked his activities, and he has one of the fine places of the 
township. Mr. Doughman married on March 5, 1891, Miss Laurina Jane 
Stoles becoming his wife. She is the daughter of Jacob and Anna 
(Reindfuse) Stoles, the family having come from Ohio. Mr. Stoles 
was a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and he settled with his 
parents in Ohio at the age of eight years, in 1848. He was a shoe-maker 
by trade, and in his young life taught school for some years. He turned 
his attention to farming after coming to Indiana and became quite suc- 
cessful in his work in that department of industry. Mr. Stoles was a 
Civil war veteran, serving three years as a member of Company F, One 
Hundredth Regiment of Infantry of Ohio, and was a sergeant of his 
company most of the time. While still a resident of Ohio Mr. Stoles 
spent some years in the railway service, first as a locomotive fireman 
and then as engineer. He had one serious collision near Toledo, from 
which his health suffered to such an extent that he gave up the work 
and retired to Fort Wayne, where he bought a small farm and passed 
the remainder of his life on it. Mrs. Stoles still lives on the farm in 
the vicinity of Fort Wayne. They were the parents of four children. 
Laurine Jane is the wife of the subject. Clara May lives in Iowa. Fred- 
erick W. is principal of the high school at Alexander. Albert Edward 
is a practicing physician in Fort Wayne. To Mr. and Mrs. Doughman 
were born four children. Albert, the eldest, lives in Chicago. Anna, 
Newton and Agnes are still at home with the parents. Mr. Doughman 
and his family have membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
is a Democrat in politics and his fraternal relations are confined to mem- 
bership in the Modern Woodmen of America at Roanoke. 

D. Burns Douglass is now numbered among the representative young- 
er members of the Fort Wayne bar and has been established in the general 
practice of his profession in his native city since the wanter of 1905. 
His ability has been shown in results achieved as a resourceful trial 
lawyer and well fortified counselor, and his advancement in his profes- 
sion has been based upon hard work and close application, the while 
he has shown deep appreciation of and has insistently observed the un- 
written code of ethics by which the dignity and distinction of his chosen 
calling have been upheld. Mr. Douglass was born in Fort Wayne Novem- 
ber 24, 1879, and is a son of William B. and Hannah (Clark) Douglass. 
His father, who was born and reared in New Hampshire, a scion of 
sterling colonial ancestry, came to Fort Wayne in 1863 and for many 
years thereafter served as a conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad 
lines. He was one of the oldest passenger-train conductors in the service 
of the company at the time when he retired, and he and his wife are now 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 141 

deceased. Of the three children William V. and Curtis C. are deceased, 
and thus the subject of this review is the only survivor. D. Burns 
Douglass continued his studies in the public schools of Fort Wayne until 
he had completed the curriculum of the high school, and he then went 
to his father 's native state and entered historic old Dartmouth College, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1903 and from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Letters. He also pursued a course 
in the law department of the institution. He took lively interest in the 
athletic affairs of his alma mater while an undergraduate, and this gave 
him special facility and judgment when he assumed the position of sport- 
ing editor of the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, his service in this capacity 
having covered the season of 1904. In December of 1905 Mr. Douglass 
was admitted to the bar of his native state, and he has since been actively 
engaged in the practice of law in Fort Wayne, where he has built up a 
substantial and representative law business. He is an active member 
of the Allen County Bar Association and has the confidence and good 
will of his professional confreres, who are appreciative of the ability 
which has enabled him to win success in his exacting vocation. In politics 
Mr. Douglass is a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican 
party, and he and his wife are active members of Plymouth Congrega- 
tional church. In the Masonic fraternity he has received the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and now, 1917, is 
Worshipful Master of Home Lodge Number 342, F. and A. M. He is 
affiliated also with the Knights of Pythias, besides which he holds mem- 
bership in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and the Fortnightly Club. 
On July 19, 1911, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Douglass to Miss 
Marian L. Bridgman, of Northampton, Massachusetts, their acquaintance- 
ship having been formed while he was a student at Dartmouth College. 
The two children of this union are William Burns and Robert Bridgman, 
Mrs, Douglass was born and reared in the old Bay state and is representa- 
tive of old and distinguished colonial families in New England, that graci- 
ous cradle of much of our national history. She is a daughter of Dwight S. 
and Mary (Lyons) Bridgman, who still restide in their native state of 
Massachusetts, the mother being a direct descendent of the distinguished 
Rev. Jonathan Edwards, the historic figure in New England colonial 
annals, and also of Mary Lyons, who was the founder of Mount Holyoke 
College, in Massachusetts. 

Thomas C. Dowling. — A successful business man prior to his appoint- 
ment to his present position as postmaster at New Haven, Thomas C, 
Dowling brought to his duties as a government official an experience 
that fitted him admirably for the successful administration of the office. 
He is a native son of New Haven, born there on November 16, 1879, 
and his parents were Bartholomew and Mary (Moriarty) Dowling. The 
father was born in county Kerry, Ireland, and the mother was of New 
Jersey birth. Bartholomew Dowling came to America as a lad of seven 
years in the year 1849. With his parents he located in Sidney, Ohio, 
and there had his education in the parochial schools of that community. 
He was nineteen years old when the Civil war broke out and he promptly 
enlisted for the three months' period the government asked for the 
defense of the nation. He began his service on April 27, 1861, as a mem- 
ber of the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio Infantry, and after a 
service of one hundred days returned to Sidney and applied himself to 
work as a tinsmith. After seven years of attention to the work in Sidney 
he went to Fort Wayne, Indiana, and secured employment with the 



142 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Pennsylvania Railroad, and in 1869 came to New Haven, engaging in 
the hardware and tinning business. He was identified contiuously with 
the business he then established to the end of his life and the business 
is still carried on under the same name by his son, James Dowling. 
Mr. Dowling died on May 13, 1912, when he was seventy years of age. 
He was a Democrat in pplitics, a Roman Catholic, a member of the 
Knights of St. John, and a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians 
at Fort Wayne. He was a good citizen, an honorable business man and 
one of the leaders in thought and action in his community. His passing 
was a loss to New Haven and he was mourned by all who knew him. His 
marriage to Miss Mary Moriarty took place on January 8, 1879, in 
Urbana, Ohio, where she was born and reared. They became the parents 
of six children. Thomas C, who is the immediate subject of this family 
review, was the first born. Mae is the wife of Dennis Daly of Fort 
Wayne. John is a resident of Fort Wayne. Bartholomew is deceased. 
James is in New Haven, in charge of the business the father left, and 
William was located in Detroit, but is now with Company E, Twelfth 
Battery, U. S. A. Thomas C. Dowling had his early schooling in the 
parochial school of St. John's church in New Haven, after which he 
attended the Brothers' School of Fort Wayne. His education finished, 
he secured employment in the offices of the Hibbard-Spencer-Bartlett 
Company of Chicago, where he spent five years, and gained a compre- 
hensive working knowledge of the hardware business. He then returned 
to his native place and took charge of the Dowling Hardware Store, re- 
lieving his father of much of the responsibility of the place, though the 
elder gentleman continued the nominal head of the establishment as 
long as he lived. On March 9, 1915, Mr. Dowling was appointed to the 
office of postmaster and he quitted the hardware business, leaving his 
brother, James, in charge. He has since devoted himself exclusively to 
the duties of his office. Mr. Dowling, like his father, is a staunch Demo- 
crat, a member of St. John's Roman Catholic church of New Haven, a 
member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and he is also a member 
of the Catholic Order of Foresters, and the New Haven Commercial Club. 
He is one of the up-and-doing young men of the community and has a 
host of good friends in the town that he has always called home, while his 
acquaintance throughout the county is wide and varied. 

Mjrron S. Downing.— The full measure of constructive service that 
justifies success was rendered by the late Myron Sexton Downing, who 
maintained his home in Allen county during virtually his entire life and 
who gained distinct prestige as one of the able and representative business 
men of Fort Wayne. In this city he was engaged in the wholesale baking 
business at the time of his death, which occurred June 10, 1913, and his 
character and achievement were such as to make most consistent the brief 
memorial tribute which it is possible to pay him in this publication. Mr. 
Downing was born at Sandusky, Ohio, in October, 1859, and was a child 
at the time when he came to Allen county, Indiana, with his parents, 
Jeremiah and Cynthia (Sexton) Downing, both of whom were born and 
reared in the old Buckeye state. Jeremiah Downing became one of the 
successful farmers of Allen county, and here both he and his wife passed 
the remainder of their lives, secure in the high esteem of all who knew 
them. The subject of this memoir was the only child and was accorded 
good educational advantages in his youth, including those of Heidelberg 
College, at Tiffin, Ohio. As a young man he proved a successful teacher 
in the public schools, but he did not long devote his attention to the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 143 

pedagogic profession. He became identified with the retail clothing 
business in Fort Wayne, and later he became a traveling salesman for 
the wholesale cracker and candy house of Louis Fox, in which connection 
he continued his effective services for many years. He finally was ap- 
pointed manager of the Fort Wayne plant of the National Biscuit Com- 
pany, and later purchased the local plant and business, to the control 
and management of which he continued to give his attention, as a manu- 
facturer and wholesale dealer in standard food products, until the close 
of his life, his energy, progressiveness and sterling character having made 
him the ideal business man and his high sense of personal stewardship 
having dominated his course in all of the relations of life. His political 
allegiance was given to the Eepublican party and he was well fortified 
in his opinions concerning governmental policies and public affairs in 
general, though he never manifested any desire for official preferment. 
He was affiliated prominently with the Masonic fraternity and the Benev- 
olent & Protective Order of Elks, and was a valued member of the Fort 
Wayne Commercial Club. On December 18, 1895, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Downing to Miss Lewella Donaldson, who was born at 
Goshen, the judicial center of Elkhart county, Indiana, and who is a 
daughter of William B. and Annie J. (Ferguson) Donaldson, the latter 
of whom is deceased and the former has the active management of the 
business formerly owned by the subject of this memoir. The parents 
of Mrs. Downing were born in Pennsylvania. No children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Downing and in her pleasant home Mrs. Downing is sus- 
tained and comforted by the companionship of her father, who is in 
charge of the business with which her husband was so actively identified 
at the time of his death. 

Dr. L. Park Drayer. — Possibly the best introduction of a sketch of 
the life of Dr. L. P. Drayer is a quotation from the columns of the Fort 
Wayne Journal-Gazette of September 11, 1917, referring to his appoint- 
ment as secretary of the board of health of the city of Fort Wayne. It 
says: *'Dr. L. P. Drayer, one of the best known practitioners of Fort 
Wayne, yesterday was named secretary of the city health board by 
Mayor William J. Hosey, to succeed Dr. John H. Gilpin, now a captain 
in the Medical Officers' Reserve Corps at Fort Benjamin Harrison. The 
appointment was accepted by Dr. Drayer only on condition that the 
entire salary of the office, which is $l25 monthly, be paid to Dr. Gilpin. 
The change is effective at once. Dr. Gilpin's resignation was made neces- 
sary because he expects to be absent for the duration of the war. The 
new secretary was the first health officer ever named in Fort Wayne. It 
was in 1895 that he was appointed by Mayor Chauncey B. Oakley, the 
first Republican executive for the city. During the next eight years, he 
serving two terms. Dr. Drayer organized the health system of the city 
and put it on the substantial and capable basis of today. He founded 
the first bacteriological laboratory, which also is the best in Northern 
Indiana. His work, from 1895 to 1903, put Fort Wayne on the map as a 
health center, and fruits of his efforts and foresight then have been 
apparent ever since in the workings of the health department. Although 
Dr. Drayer is a Republican, Mayor Hosey recognized his merits and the 
appointment ensued." The foregoing comment suggests not only the 
capabilities of Dr. Drayer but also the spirit of patriotism and true 
service which characterizes his activities. No one more than he has 
contributed to the welfare of the suffering and the needy, though the 



144 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

service has been so quietly performed that it is only when it appears in 
connection with some great public project like the playground move- 
ment or matters connected with the city health department that the 
people get a glimpse of the truth. Dr. Drayer was born in Hartford 
City, Indiana, May 4, 1870, son of Dr. Peter and Matilda (Oldfather) 
Drayer, the former deceased and the latter a resident of Fort Wayne. 
The childhood of Dr. L. Park Drayer was passed in his native town, 
where he attended the public schools before entering upon a course in 
Hanover College. Following this course of preparation, he came to Fort 
Wayne and became a student in the Fort Wayne Medical College, then 
one of the foremost institutions of the Middle West. This was in 1892. 
He remained here one year and then went to Chicago, where he took a 
course in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Returning to Fort 
Wayne, he re-entered the Fort Wayne Medical College and graduated in 
1895. By this time his acquaintanceship had grown to such proportions 
that he decided to locate here permanently. The wisdom of his choice 
is plainly shown in the marked success which has attended his years of 
professional duties. Dr. Drayer 's position among the members of the 
profession is indicated by his membership in the county and state medical 
societies and in the American Medical Association. He is a member of 
the Central States Pediatric Society, and the American Society of Teach- 
ers of Pediatrics, and holds the position of professor of diseases of chil- 
dren in the University of Indiana. As stated in the foregoing quotation, 
he served as the city chemist and bacteriologist from 1895 to 1902. His 
activities are by no means confined to his professional field. As a member 
of the Commercial and of the Rotary Clubs, he has always displayed a 
keen interest in civic affairs. He is a member of the Fort Wayne Lodge of 
Elks. Dr. Drayer was married, October 9, 1895. at Madison, Indiana, to 
Miss Gertrude Greiner, a native of that city. Two children — Gertrude 
Hillis and L. Park, Jr. — have been born to this union. Dr. and Mrs. 
Drayer are affiliated with Trinity Episcopal church. The handsome family 
home is located at the junction of West Berry and Webster streets. 

John Dreibelbiss was one who gave to the world distinct assurance 
of strong and worthy manhood, and his achievement was limited only 
by the confines that time and opportunity set for every individual person. 
He was a representative of one of the well known and sterling pioneer 
families of Allen county, became one of the prominent and successful 
business men of Fort Wayne and his admirable intellectual powers and 
business acumen enabled him to win success and to make for himself a 
place of special influence in connection with the abstract and real estate 
business in his native county, where he ever commanded unqualified 
popular confidence and good will, his death having occurred at his home 
in Fort Wayne on October 7, 1915, and a tribute to his memory being 
specially consistent as a contribution to this history. Mr. Dreibelbiss 
was born at Fort Wayne March 24, 1853, and was a son of John P. and 
Anna (Saurer) Dreibelbiss, the former of whom was born in Bavaria, 
Germany, November 28, 1829, and the latter in Switzerland, on April 24 
of the same year, their marriage having been solemnized in Fort Wayne, 
and their children having been seven in number, namely : John, Christian 
G., Christina R., Conrad W., Mary L., Robert B., and Edward D. The 
honored father died December 31, 1886, and his widow survived him by 
a number of years. John P. Dreibelbiss was but three years old at the 
time of his parents' immigration from Bavaria to America, and the family 



1 




. YORK 
LIBRARY 



Ai-TOK, LENOX 
'ItLDEN FOUNDATION 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 145 

became early settlers in Fort Wayne, which was then a mere straggling 
settlement surrounding the old fort which gave title to the fine little 
city of the present day. The journey from Buffalo, New York, to north- 
ern Indiana was made with wagon and ox team, and John P. Dreibelbiss 
contributed his quota to the development and progress of Allen county 
along both civic and material lines. He to whom this memoir is dedicated 
received the best educational advantages afforded in the common schools 
of Fort Wayne in the period of his childhood and youth, and his alert 
and receptive mind enabled him eventually to become a man of broad 
information and mature judgment. Energetic and self-reliant, the youth 
early turned his attention to work that would enable him to depend 
largely on his own resources, and for a time he was employed as a clerk 
in the grocery store of the late Mason Long. Later he was employed 
by J. B. White, who conducted what was known as the White Fruit 
Store, and after severing this connection he found employment in a 
wholesale tea establishment in the city of Chicago, where he remained 
until this house, together with the greater portion of the business district 
of the city, was swept away by the historic Chicago fire of 1871. Mr. 
Dreibelbiss then returned to Fort Wayne, and for some time thereafter 
gave his attention to farming and floriculture, in the immediate vicinity 
of the city. Later he resumed the occupation of clerk in a grocery, and 
in 1883 engaged in the upbuilding of a general abstract business, work- 
ing out careful and authentic abstracts of title covering all realty in 
Allen county and making his records the authoritative data in this all 
important line. He completed the arduous and exacting task of copying 
from the county's deed, mortgage and court records all requisite data 
concerning the titles to real estate in every township of the county and 
then, on January 1, 1887, incorporated his business under the title of the 
Dreibelbiss Abstract of Title Company. His efforts caused the general 
public to come to a proper realization of the necessity of obtaining clear 
titles to property when the same was about to change owners, and the 
abstract business became an important adjunct of all real estate trans- 
actions in the county. Thus it was but natural that Mr. Dreibelbiss 
should, within a short time, expand the scope of his business to include 
the handling of real estate, the extending of financial loans upon real 
estate security and making these departments of his enterprise an im- 
portant feature of his well ordered activities. He further showed pro- 
gressive spirit and confidence in the continued growth of Fort Wayne 
by associating in a financial way with various manufacturing industries in 
his home city. John Dreibelbiss thus became one of the substantial and 
valued business men and influential citizens of Fort Wayne, and in his 
death the city lost an upright, loyal and valued citizen and resourceful 
and influential man of affairs. In connection with his business he became 
the author of an excellent little book, to which he gave the title, ''Start 
Right," and in this he concisely and effectively defined the necessity 
for the authenticating of all titles to real estate, the publication, as 
placed in popular circulation, having had much influence in furthering 
the success of the abstract business that was founded by him. He never 
sought public office but was a staunch supporter of the cause of the Re- 
publican party. He attended the Christian Science church. In 1877 Mr. 
Dreibelbiss wedded Miss Kate M. Darrow, and after her death he con- 
tracted a second marriage. Miss Anna Fahlsing then becoming his wife 
and her home being still maintained in Fort Wayne. 



146 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

William H. Dreier is one of the veteran and honored business men 
of Fort Wayne, where he has been identified with the retail drug trade for 
more than half a century and where, though he is now living virtually 
retired, he is still president of the well established drug business con- 
ducted under the corporate title of The Dreier Dru^ Company. Mr. 
Dreier has contributed a generous quota to the civic and material develop- 
ment and progress of the metropolis of Allen county and has long been 
known as one of the city's representative business men and unassumingly 
influential citizens, the while his is the further distinction of being a 
native of the Hoosier state and a scion of one of its honored pioneer 
families. William H. Dreier was born at Madison, the judicial center of 
Jefferson county, Indiana, in December, 1842, and is the only surviving 
member of a family of four children, in which he was the second in order 
of birth, the others having been Henry, Mary and Joseph. He is a son 
of Henry and Mary (Mitla) Dreier, both of whom were born in Germany. 
Upon coming to America Henry Dreier numbered himself among the 
pioneers of Jefferson county, Indiana, where he reclaimed and improved 
a farm and where he also conducted for a number of years one of the 
pioneer hotels in the now thriving little city of Madison, the county seat, 
both he and his wife having continued their residence in Jefferson county 
until their death and both having been earnest communicants of the Catho- 
lic church. William H. Dreier acquired his preliminary education in the 
Catholic parochial schools at Madison and supplemented this by higher 
academic studies in St. Mary's College at Lebanon, Kentucky. After 
leaving college he returned to his native town of Madison, and after 
having there been for several years employed as a clerk in a general store 
he came, about 1863, to Fort Wayne, in company with his brother Henry, 
They purchased the drug store of Caspar Schoer, and thereafter continued 
their partnership alliance until the death of Henry Dreier, in 1875. Wil- 
liam H. then assumed full control of the prosperous enterprise, and under 
his effective management it was developed into one of the largest and 
most important of its kind in Allen county. This pioneer drug business 
is now conducted under corporate control, and though Mr. Dreier retired 
from active association with the business in 1911 he still continues presi- 
dent of the company and is a valued counselor in the directing of its 
policies. He has been one of the liberal and progressive citizens of Fort 
Wayne, is a stalwart advocate of the cause of the Democratic party but 
has never been imbued with ambition for political activity or public office. 
He and his wife are numbered among the most venerable and honored 
communicants of the Cathedral parish of the Catholic church in their 
home city, and he has long maintained affiliation with the Knights of 
Columbus. On November 11, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Dreier to Miss Mary Corcoran, who was born and reared in Fort Wayne, 
where her parents, Patrick and Bridget (Bartley) Corcoran, natives of 
Ireland, established their residence in the pioneer days, when the present 
city was a mere village. Mr. Corcoran was here engaged in the grocery 
business for many years and here he and his wife passed the residue of 
their worthy and useful lives. Of their five children IMrs. Dreier is the 
eldest ; Frances is the widow of Teles F. Gerow and still resides in Fort 
Wayne ; Owen died in this city, and the next two children died in infancy. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Dreier were born four children : Loreto is the wife of 
Edward Gilmartin, Jr., of Fort Wayne ; Frances remains at the parental 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 147 

home; Genevieve is deceased; and Mary Alma is the wife of "Walter 
Hamilton, of Fort "Wayne. 

Charles Frederick Henry Dreyer was born in Germany, November 
27, 1843, son of Philip and Engel (Brookmeirer) Dreyer, both of German 
birth and ancestry, who spent their lives in their native land. They were 
the parents of five children — Henry, Charles, Sophia, William and Getta. 
Henry, it should be stated here, served from 1861 to 1864 in the Union 
army during the Civil war and is now deceased. Getta, the youngest, is 
also deceased. Charles Dreyer had his education in his native land and 
came to America in 1870, arriving in Fort Wayne on October 24. He 
found employment in the blacksmith shop of the Pennsylvania Lines and 
was fifteen years in that work, coming to Washington township on May 
8, 1885. He bought a small farm and devoted his energies to its cultiva- 
tion. Success followed his efforts and he is today owner of 170 acres 
in this township. He has developed the land to a high state of produc- 
tiveness and it is a modern and well kept place in every respect. Mr. 
Dreyer was married, September 18, 1873, to Miss Christina Salaraon, 
daughter of Charles Salamon, of whom further mention is made on other 
pages of this publication. Eight children were born to them. William, 
born on June 18, 1874, died November 8, 1887. Charles was born No- 
vember 30, 1876. The others are Lizzie, Emma, Anna, Amelia, Frederick 
and Marie. Mr. Dreyer was highway commissioner of his township for 
seventeen years and with his family has membership in St. Paul's Luth- 
eran church in Fort Wayne. 

Louis Dudenhoefer. — The record of the life of Louis Dudenhoefer is 
not more eventful to contemplate than is that of the average man of his 
station and occupation, but it is the achievements of such as he that has 
made of Allen county the rich and progressive section it is known to be 
at this time. Mr. Dudenhoefer was born on June 25, 1852, in Marion 
township, Allen county, and is the son of Philip and Anna (Riel) Duden- 
hoefer, who came direct from their homes in Germany to Allen county, 
and two years later settled in Marion township, where they spent the 
rest of their lives. They bought land, uncleared and unproven, and built 
a small cabin home in which to begin their independent career as farmers. 
Mr. Dudenhoefer "was industrious and success followed his efforts so that 
in a short time he was able to add to his original twenty acres by a pur- 
chase of one hundred and twenty-three acres near by. In later life he 
acquired a good deal of town property and the declining years of his 
life were spent in Fort Wayne, where he died at the age of seventy. 
His widow survived to the age of eighty-two. They were of the German- 
Lutheran faith and their children were reared in the same religious belief. 
They were the parents of Philip, now a resident of Fort Wayne ; Louis, 
the subject of this sketch ; Margaret, who married Frank Braber of Fort 
Wayne, and Francis, who is deceased. Louis Dudenhoefer had his educa- 
tion in the Lutheran schools of his home community and was trained to 
farm life under the instruction of his father, whose assistant he was for 
years. When the elder Dudenhoefer retired the son rented the home place 
and continued as a renter for some years, but in 1904 he bought a farm, 
where he has since been successfully engaged in stock-farming. Like 
his father, he is a Democrat, active in local politics, and is a member 
of the German-Lutheran church. He was married on May 18, 1875, to 
Miss Lena Geischer, who came of German parents and was herself of 
German birth, her father having died on shipboard when the family was 



148 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

making the journey from Germany to America. Mrs. Dudenhoefer died in 
December, 1912, the mother of twelve children. George and Frank are 
located in Fort Wayne, there engaged together in the grocery business. 
Henry died in 1913. Frederick and Louis are at home. Mary married 
Fred Lepper, of Marion township. Nettie is the wife of William Oster- 
hause, also of Marion township. Anna lives in Fort Wayne. Bertha and 
Gertrude are still at home, while Matilda and Lena, the youngest of the 
family, are located in Fort Wayne. 

Hermann A. Duemling, M. D., has brought to bear in the work of 
his profession the full powers of a strong and resourceful personality and 
also the technical ability and skill that have won for him secure vantage- 
ground as one of the essentially representative physicians and surgeons 
of Indiana. He is engaged in the active practice of his profession in 
the city of Fort Wayne, is chief of the staff of surgeons of the Lutheran 
Hospital, and is an acknowledged leader in the ranks of his profession in 
northern Indiana, besides being known also as a liberal and public- 
spirited citizen. Dr. Duemling was born at Addison, Dupage county, 
Illinois, on the 18th of September, 1871, and is a son of Professor Hermann 
F. and Jennie (Sulzer) Duemling, the former of whom was born in the 
historic old town of Magdeburg, Prussia, and the latter at Cedarville, 
Wisconsin, their marriage having been solemnized in the Badger state. 
In his native land Hermann F. Duemling received the best of educational 
advantages and that he was a man of high intellectual attainments is 
evidenced by the fact that he received the academic degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. He came to the United States in 1867 and established his 
residence in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he became an in- 
structor in the city high school. A few years later, after his marriage, 
he removed to Addison, Illinois, where he was engaged as teacher of 
mathematics and science in the teachers' seminary. About 1873 he came 
with his family to Fort Wayne, where he became a valued member of the 
faculty of Concordia College, as a teacher of mathematics and natural 
science. Finally he returned to Milwaukee as the chief editor of the 
"Germania," in which capacity he served for the ensuing period of 
twelve years — or until the time of his death, which occurred March 13, 
1913, his widow still maintaining her home in the Wisconsin metropolis, 
and being a devout communicant of the Lutheran church, as was also her 
revered husband. Professor Duemling entered fully into the spirit of 
American institutions and customs and was a loyal supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, his sterling character giving him inviolable 
place in popular esteem. Of the children the eldest is Dr. Duemling, 
immediate subject of this review; Enno is the city missionary of Mil- 
waukee ; Paula is the widow of Albert C. Koch and she too is a resident 
of Milwaukee; Jennie is the wife of Dr. Richard Clausen, of that city; 
Thekla remains at the home of her mother; and Gerhard, a chemist by 
profession, likewise resides in Milwaukee. Dr. Duemling was a child 
of about two years at the time of the family removal to Fort Wayne, 
and here he acquired his rudimentary education in the parochial school 
of St. Paul's Lutheran church. In 1889 he was graduated in Concordia 
College, and in consonance with his well defined ambition he then began 
preparing himself for his chosen profession. He entered the medical 
department of Washington University, in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, 
and in the same was graduated in 1892, with the well earned degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. He has been an enthusiast in his profession and has 



rj'tjr tar^Y/ YOKK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOK, 



1 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 149 

insistently kept in line with the advances made in both medical and 
surgical science. In 1897 he did most effective post-graduate work in the 
city of Berlin, Germany, where he studied in and attended the clinics of 
the Friederich Wilhelm University, his attention having been given prin- 
cipally to an advanced course in surgery. The Doctor served his pro- 
fessional novitiate by establishing himself in practice in Fort Wayne 
in the year 1892, soon after his graduation, and for the first decade his 
practice was of general order. Since that time he has confined his service 
largely to the surgical branch of practice, and in this important field 
he has gained more than local prestige. High attainments and close and 
faithful application have constituted the basis of his unequivocal success 
and have been the source through which he has won high standing in 
the exacting and humane vocation to which he is devoting himself with 
all of earnest zeal and self-abnegation. He has been the head of the 
surgical staff of the Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne since 1905, has 
given most effective service as a member of the city board of health, and 
is affiliated with the Allen County Medical Society, the Fort Wayne 
Academy of Medicine, the Indiana State Medical Society, the Tri-State 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. His political 
allegiance is given to the Republican party and both he and his wife 
are active communicants of the parish of St. Paul's Lutheran church. 
On October 5, 1893, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Duemling to Miss 
Adeline A. Stuermer, daughter of William and Augusta (Mauth) Stuer- 
mer, of Fort Wayne. Mr. Stuermer was born in Brandenburg, Prussia, 
learned in his native land the trade of cabinet maker, and in the late 
'60s came to the United States. Many years ago he established his home 
in Fort Wayne, where he was long employed at his trade in the shops 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, his death having occurred May 23, 1892, 
and his widow being still a resident of Fort Wayne. Dr. and Mrs. Duem- 
ling have an interesting family of six children — Editha, Jennie, Werner, 
Miles, Arnold, and Gerhard. The year 1917 finds Editha, Jennie and 
Werner as students in the University of Michigan, and Miles in the Fort 
Wayne high school. 

Frank R. Dulin. — The ability, character and achievement of Mr. 
Dulin have given him established vantage-ground as one of the leading 
lawyers of the younger generation in the city of Fort Wayne, where he 
has been engaged in the general practice of his profession since 1903. 
His standing in the community and as a member of the Allen county bar 
is assured and enviable, as shown by his having served five years as 
attorney for the juvenile court of Fort Wayne, under the regime of Judge 
Edward O'Rourke, and by his having been for four years deputy pros- 
ecuting attorney of Allen county, under the administration of 
Harry H. Hilgemann. Mr. Dulin was born in Boone county, Indiana, on 
November 6, 1880, and is a son of John A. and Mary A. (Carr) Dulin, the 
former of whom is now deceased and the latter maintains her home at 
Lebanon, Ind., the father having devoted the major part of his active 
career to the fundamental industries of agriculture and stock-growing. 
He whose name initiates this article was the fifth in order of birth in a 
family of seven children, all of whom are living. Frank R. Dulin found 
the period of his childhood and early youth compassed by the sturdy 
and benign influences of the home farm and he continued his studies in 
the public schools of his native county until he had availed himself of 
the advantages of the high school at Lebanon, the county seat. In prep- 



150 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

aration for his chosen profession he entered the Indiana Law School, 
at Indianapolis, and in this well ordered institution was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1902, his reception of the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws being virtually coincident with his admission to the bar of his native 
state. For the first year after his graduation he was serving his profes- 
sional novitiate at Lebanon, judicial center of his native county, where 
he continued in practice until his removal to Fort Wayne, in 1903. Here 
he has built up a substantial general law business and gained definite 
prestige as a versatile and successful trial lawyer. He has appeared in 
connection with important litigations in the courts of this section of 
Indiana and the character, scope and cumulative tendency of his law 
business denotes the popular estimate placed upon him. Mr. Dulin is 
found arrayed as a loyal and efl^ective advocate of the cause of the Demo- 
cratic party, he and his wife hold membership in the Baptist church, he 
is a member of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and the Country Club, 
and in the Masonic fraternity his maximum York Rite affiliation is with 
Fort Wayne Commandery of Knights Templar, besides which he has 
received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite 
and is affiliated also with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. August 28, 1912, recorded the marriage of Mr. Dulin to 
Miss Delia Hughbanks, who likewise was born and reared in Boone 
county, and who is a daughter of James A. and Luella (Nelson) Hugh- 
banks, well known citizens of that county, where her father is a repre- 
sentative farmer, Mr. and Mrs. Dulin have two children — Frank R., II., 
and Myrtle. 

Thomas Dunkel has been a resident of Allen county since 1904 and 
is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred and eight acres, 
in Sections 14 and 23, Springfield township. Throughout his entire inde- 
pendent career he has been an energetic and successful exemplar of agri- 
cultural enterprise, and through the medium of the same has achieved 
definite prosperity, the while his course has been so ordered in all of the 
relations of life that he has proved a helpful factor in community affairs 
and has merited and received the confidence and good will of his fellow 
men. Mr. Dunkel was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, is the youngest 
son in a family of eight children, and all of his brothers and sisters still 
reside in the old home county of Pickaway, namely : Isaac, Malinda, 
Amos, Jr., Catherine, Laura A. and Amanda J. Mary, the third in order 
of birth, died in childhood. The parents — Amos and Catherine (Stout) 
Dunkel — passed their entire lives in Pickaway county, Ohio, the father 
having been a native of Pickaway township and the mother of Washing- 
ton township, and they were representatives of sterling pioneer families 
of that section of the old Buckeye state. Amos Dunkel was a scion of 
staunch German ancestry and was one of the substantial farmers of his 
native county during his entire independent career. He whose name 
initiates this review was born on the old homestead farm of his parents, 
in Pickaway county, and, as previously intimated, is the only one of the 
family'- to have found a theater of successful enterprise outside of his 
native county, the date of his birth having been August 12, 1861. He 
is indebted to the common schools of his native county for his early 
educational discipline and in his youth gained close friendship with 
honest toil and endeavor, in connection with the work of the home farm. 
He thus gained at first hand his broad and diversified knowledge of agri- 
cultinral and live-stock industry, of which he continued a representative 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 151 

in his native county until January 1, 1904, when, after having disposed 
of his property in Ohio, he came to Allen county, Indiana, and purchased 
a farm of eighty acres, in Section 23, Springfield township. He has since 
bought an additional tract of twenty-eight acres, in Section 14, and is 
thus the owner of a well improved farm of model type — a demesne that 
gives every evidence of thrift and prosperity and that constitutes one 
of the many attractive rural estates of Allen county. His political alleg- 
iance is given to the Democratic party and he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the Lutheran church. In 1905 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Dunkel to Miss Barbara Boger, who was born and reared in this 
county and who is a member of one of its old and honored families. She 
is a daughter of Samuel and Susanna (Baltz) Boger, who were children 
at the time when the respective families settled in Springfield township, 
about the year 1840, at which time the township could claim only six 
or eight families residing within its borders. The parents of Mrs, Dunkel 
continued their residence in this township until their death and the 
names of both merit place on the roster of the honored pioneers of the 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Dunkel have one child, Ruth. 

Charles A. Dunkelberg-. — The activities of Charles A. Dunkelberg 
have brought him into contact with "all sorts and conditions of men." 
From these he seems to have learned, while his own personality has in- 
spired and taught, with the result that the absorption and cultivation of 
talents of wide range have not only made him a successful man of busi- 
ness and executive worth but one who counts his warm friends by the 
hundreds. Fort Wayne knows no home more truly hospitable than that 
of the Dunkelberg 's on South Fairfield avenue. Mr. Dunkelberg was 
born in Chemung, New York, April 4, 1865, the son of Charles A. and 
Eliza (Lassen) Dunkelberg, both natives of Germany. At the age of two, 
Mr. Dunkelberg removed with his parents to the town of Honesdale, 
Pennsylvania, where the son at the age of twelve was employed for 
the period of a year in a drug store. After leaving the common schools, 
he entered Eastman Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York, and 
graduated from that institution well equipped with the foundation for 
a successful business career. He was at this time an expert in stenog- 
raphy, and this accomplishment became a marked factor in his advance- 
ment in the business world, and he was one of the first stenographers in 
northeastern Pennsylvania. He also brought the first typewriter into that 
section of the state. He had already devoted his attention to a training 
course in business practice. His first employment, after leaving school, 
was with the banking and brokerage firm of E. C. Benedict and Com- 
pany, in New York City, where, as a young man of ready perception and 
strong character, he was enabled to gain actual experience in the applica- 
tion of the theories gained from the schools. Afterward, he entered the 
employ of Joseph T. Ryerson and Son, iron merchants, at Chicago. Here 
he developed the talents which marked him as a man of notable execu- ' 
tive ability, and this led to his selection as the steward of the State 
Hospital for the Insane, at Logansport, Indiana, a position which he 
filled with entire satisfaction for a period of five years, after which he 
chose to engage in business in Logansport. He established a wholesale 
and retail queensware store, and continued in this line for three years. 
During this period, Mr. Dunkelberg added materially to his knowledge 
of men and methods, which led to his coming to Fort Wayne to take an 
important position with S. F. Bowser and Company, world-famed makers 



152 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of self-measuring oil handling devices. It was in July, 1899, that Mr. 
Dunkelberg accepted the place of head bookkeeper for the concern. Here 
his abilities were given full course, and his promotion to the office of 
superintendent of salesmen was followed by a later advancement to that 
of secretary and treasurer of the company. His work in these various 
positions was of untold value to the company at the time when such 
service figured strongly in the success of the plant and its management. 
On September 1, 1916, Mr. Dunkelberg resigned his position with S. F. 
Bowser and Company in order to give his entire time and attention to 
the management of his large modern dairy farm, located six miles south 
of Fort Wayne, in Pleasant township, Allen county, Mr. Dunkelberg was 
united in marriage on May 1, 1895, with Miss Anna C. Crockett, daughter 
of Franklin and Sarah (Murdock) Crockett, of Lafayette, Ind. To this 
union have been born four sons — Charles A., Ralph C, Paul C. and 
David C. Mr. Dunkelberg is a true sportsman. His fondness for hunting 
"big game" takes him frequently into the Canadian forests, and he has 
made several trips to Mexico and the southwest on similar quests, the 
success of which is attested by the collection of mounted specimens of 
the results of the hunt in the forest and on the plain. The travels of Mr. 
Dunkelberg have taken him to all portions of the United States and 
into many sections of Canada and Mexico, and several business trips have 
required his presence in the capitals of Europe. Mr. Dunkelberg is in- 
terested in many Fort Wayne financial and other institutions and his 
counsel as a member of governing boards has proven to be of the utmost 
value. His position in business circles of his home city is suggested by his 
election to the presidency of the Wayne club of Fort Wayne during the 
year it was united with the Commercial Club. He is active in Masonic 
circles where he holds the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite body, 
and also is a Knight Templar. He is a member of the Indiana Society of 
Chicago. Mr. Dunkelberg is a true optimist, and always he displays a 
delightful fellowship which has won for him countless real friends. 

Washington Dunten. — It is now permitted to accord merited tribute 
to one of the native sons of Allen county who has passed the psalmist's 
span of three-score years and ten and who has been worthily and promi- 
nently identified with civic, industrial and business affairs in the county. 
He now resides on his attractive homestead farm, in Perry township, 
about ten miles distant from Huntertown, from which village he receives 
service on rural mail route No. 2. Mr. Dunten served twelve years as 
postmaster at Huntertown, from which office he retired in 1913, and for 
five years was engaged in the dry-goods business in that village. Though 
now living in virtual retirement, he takes much satisfaction in giving 
a general supervision to his farm, is favored in the splendid retention 
of his physical and mental powers and takes a lively interest in all things 
pertaining to the county which has ever been his home and in the develop- 
ment and progress of which he has played well his part. Mr. Dunten 
was born at Huntertown, January 26, 1841, at which time the now pro- 
gressive village was a mere hamlet in the midst of a partially developed 
agricultural district. He is a son of Ephraim Howard and Pamelia 
(Hicks) Dunten, the former of whom was born in Jefferson county, New 
York, and the latter at Hartford, Connecticut, their marriage having 
been solemnized in the state of Michigan. The parents passed the closing 
years of their lives in Allen county, where the father died, July 24, 1854, 
the devoted mother having attained to venerable age and having passed 



POB^i. 



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FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 153 

to the life eternal on July 17, 1894, after surviving her husband by fully 
forty years. The old homestead farm, of forty acres, is that now owned 
and occupied by the subject of this review, and the father operated in an 
early day the pioneer hotel in Huntertown, the same having been kno-\vn 
as Dunten's Tavern. His first wife was Clarinda Bentley, of Jefferson 
comity. New York, and her death occurred, February 26, 1839. The three 
children of this union were Louisa, Daniel I. and William IL, all of whom 
are now deceased. Of the four children of the second marriage, Washing- 
ton Dunten, of this review, is the eldest; Lucy A. is the wife of Jacob 
Furth, who is president of one of the national banks in the city of Seattle, 
Washington, as well as president of a railroad company in the west; 
Lucien, who was born September 10, 1845, died on November 4 of the fol- 
lowing year, and his funeral was held from the pioneer Dunten tavern 
or hotel at Huntertown, the same having been at the time the family 
home ; Ella Medora, who was born February 16, 1849, was about thirty- 
five years of age at the time of her death. He whose name initiates this 
review acquired his early education in the pioneer log school house at 
Huntertown, and his boyhood days were passed in the old-time hotel 
conducted by his father, though later he began to aid in the work of the 
home farm, of which he is now the owner. In addition to this old home- 
stead of forty acres he owns an adjoining tract of eighty-eight acres, 
and the place is one of the well improved and valuable farms of Perry 
township. Mr. Dunten has been an energetic and successful exponent of 
agricultural industry and also active in the mercantile business, as previ- 
ously intimated in this article, besides which he has been known and 
honored as a man of sterling character and one who has been influential 
in community affairs. He has designated himself as a Lincoln Republican 
and has given effective service in the local ranks of his party, besides 
having held for twelve years the office of postmaster at Huntertown, as 
previously noted. He was formerly in active afifiliation with a Fort 
Wayne lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his 
wife have been earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
fully forty years. November 24, 1866, recorded the marriage of Mr. 
Dunten to Miss Almena E. Farrand, and she passed to the life eternal 
on October 29, 1873. Two children were born of this union: Wilna 
Augusta, who was born October 20, 1869, died December 31, 1891; and 
Wilbur Howard, who was born August 27, 1872, died June 26, 1909. The 
second marriage of Mr. Dunten was solemnized October 28, 1874, when 
Miss Hannah Wilcox, of Coldwater, Branch county, Michigan, became his 
wife. Mrs. Dunten is a daughter of James R. and Anna (Peckham) 
Wilcox, who were born in Jefferson county. New York, and became 
pioneer settlers in Michigan, where ther passed the remainder of their 
lives. Concerning the three children of Mr. and Mrs. Dunten the follow- 
ing brief record is entered in conclusion of this review: Carrie Louise, 
who was born April 13, 1880, died August 24, 1899 ; Ernest W., who was 
born September 11, 1881, at Coldwater, Michigan, is now a resident of 
Huntertown; and Lohman Clifford, who was born November 17, 1886, 
remains at the parental home and has been the popular and efficient 
carrier on one of the rural mail routes from Huntertown since 1904. 

Fred Eckart.— Fred Eckart was brought up in the packing business 
of which he is now one of the owners, getting his early experience under 
the guidance of his father, who had established the business, and thus 
laying a solid foundation for future successes. He is a native son of 



154 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Allen county, born here on December 7, 1859, and his parents were 
Fred and Elizabeth (Linker) Eckart. Mrs. Eckart is a native of Allen 
county, her parents were Engelhart and Anna (Weisheit) Linker; and 
she was born in w^hat is known as the Old Fort House in Fort Wayne 
in 1836, and now lives in the Eckart homestead at 321 East Wayne 
Street, but the father is of Bavarian birth and parentage. They became 
the parents of eleven children, ten of whom grew to maturity. Fred 
is mentioned below ; Henry I. died, aged four years ; Mrs. Sophia Ober, of 
Chicago, 111.; Anna, of Fort Wayne; Reinhart, who died at the age of 
twenty-six years; Mrs. Matilda Schultheis, of Lima, Ohio; Henry is 
mentioned elsewhere in this work ; Mrs. Caroline Schmidt, of Fort Wayne ; 
Mrs. Henrietta Pfeiffer, of Fort Wayne ; and Miss Lucy Eckart and Mrs. 
Bessie Ranke, of Fort Wayne. Mr. Eckart, whose portrait ap- 
pears on the preceding page, came to America in early 
manhood and started up in the butcher business in Fort Wayne, that 
being the trade he had learned in his native land. He had success and 
after a few years branched out in the pork packing business. From 
that small beginning has been developed the present extensive packing 
industry to which his sons succeeded when he died in 1894. Fred Eckart, 
the immediate subject of this review, had a somewhat limited schooling, 
attending the German Lutheran School on Barr Street, Fort AVayne, 
up to the age of fourteen. He then went into the business with his 
father to learn the details of the work. He familiarized himself thor- 
oughly with every phase of the business in the plant and then took up 
the selling end of the enterprise, to which he has given his best energies 
through the past fifteen years. He has made a study of modern methods 
in the packing business, and wherever he has found a new idea has put 
it into play in his own establishment, the result being that the concern 
has made steady and consistent progress with the passing years. He 
has evolved some very creditable plans for the pushing of sales into 
new territory, and all considered, may properly be said to have been an 
active force in the growth of the industry, which has more than trebled 
its output in the last twenty years. On June 28, 1888, Mr. Eckart was 
married to Miss Caroline L. Hostman, the daughter of Christ Hostman, 
of Fort Wayne. He died, March 1, 1917, aged eighty-two years. 
They became the parents of one child, Pearl Llva, who died 
at the age of four days. In Masonry Mr. Eckart has taken both the 
Scottish and York Rite, and the Shrine. He is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and the Fort 
Wayne Country Club. He has no party affiliations in politics, but prefers 
to hold himself free to indulge independent views. 

Henry Eckart, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Fred 
Eckart Packing Company, is one of the essentially progressive and rep- 
resentative business men of his native city of Fort Wayne and takes a 
loyal and helpful interest in all things tending to advance its civic, com- 
mercial and industrial prosperity and prestige. Here he was born on the 
7th of January, 1867, and he is one of the eleven children of Fred and 
Elizabeth (Linker) Eckart, the former of whom was born in the King- 
dom of Bavaria, Germany, and the latter in the old For-t House that gave 
title to the present thriving city of Fort Wayne, her parents having 
been numbered among the very early settlers of Allen county. Frederick 
Eckart long held precedence as one of the prominent business men of 
Fort Wayne, where he founded and developed a prosperous packing 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 155 

business. Henry Eckart is indebted to tbe public schools of Fort Wayne 
for his early educational training, and in the meanwhile he had become 
associated with his father's business when he was a lad of but twelve 
years. He learned the various details of this line of enterprise and con- 
tinued to be associated with his father's business until he was twenty 
years of age, when he went to Kansas City, Missouri, where he remained 
two years, as one of the employes in a leading meat-packing plant. At 
the expiration of the period noted he returned to Fort Wayne and opened 
a meat market on Ev/ing street. He built up a good business in the 
retail line but finally resumed his alliance with the extensive business of 
the Fred Eckart Packing Company, to the development and advancement 
of whose important commercial enterprise he has contributed largely 
through his progressive policies and marked executive ability, he being 
now secretary and treasurer, as well as general manager ,of the com- 
pany. In politics Mr. Eckart maintains an independent attitude, pre- 
ferring to give his support to men and measures meeting the approval of 
his judgment rather than to be guided within strict partisan lines. In 
a general way he advocates the basic principles for which the Democratic 
party stands sponsor. He and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran 
church and he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. His wife, whose maiden name was Mamie 
Voltz, is a native- of the city of Rochester, New York, and they have two 
children — Herbert and Helen. 

David S. Eckert, well known in Allen county as a manufacturer of 
cigars, was born in Fort Wayne on February 4, 1865, and is the son of 
John C. and Rachel A. (Walters) Eckert. The family was a Pennsyl- 
vania one, and the grandparents of the subject, John C. and Sarah 
(Turner) Eckert, were born and bred in that state. They died in 1844 
and 1871, respectively. Their son, John C, the father of the subject, 
was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on April 22, 1836, and when he 
was sixteen years old became identified with the cigar-making industry 
in Harrisburg. He continued in the work there until 1857, when he 
moved Avestward to Ohio, remaining there two years and returning to 
his home town in 1859. In August, 1862, he enlisted for service in the 
Union army, joining the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh regiment of 
Pennsylvania Infantry, that being one of the nineteen regiments called 
out by the governor of the state for nine months' service. He was 
mustered out in May, 1863, and in the following September brought his 
family to Fort Wayne, in which city he passed the remainder of his life. 
His first work in Fort Wayne was as a cigar-maker, but in 1870 he opened 
a shop of his own, and his factory at No. 85 Calhoun Street was the 
scene of much activity in the cigar business. He made a specialty of 
his Brand 39, which became widely popular wherever his cigars went. 
On February 8, 1857, Mr. Eckert was married to Miss Rachel A. Walters, 
who v^^as born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, and eight children were 
born to them, five of whom are yet living. The father died in 1895 and 
David, the subject of this review, took charge of the business for his 
mother. At her death, in 1909, it came into his hands, and he has con- 
tinued as the proprietor of the establishment his father was so long 
identified with. David Eckert had his education in the Fort Wayne 
public schools and finished his training with a thorough business course, 
after which he joined his father in the business, so that he has been 



156 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

identified with the cigar business all the years of his active life. Mr. 
Eckert was married on April 28, 1903, to Miss Bertha C. Scott, daughter of 
William L. and Mary Scott. Four children were born to them. Three 
are living — Mary Katherine, David S., Jr., and Robert William. Mr. 
Eckert is a Thirty-second degree Mason, with Shriner affiliations, a mem- 
ber of the Elks, the Moose, the Eagles and the Fort Wa>Tie Commercial 
Club. He is a Democrat in politics and a progressive and enterprising 
citizen. 

Frank W. Edmunds. — The name of Edmunds is one of the oldest 
and best known in Fort Wayne to-day, its representatives having been 
identified with the city and its varied activities for the past century. 
Frank W. Edmunds, the immediate subject of this brief family review, 
was born in Fort Wayne, and his father, James Edmunds, was also a 
native son of that city, born there in 1828. James Edmunds in early 
manhood engaged in the draying business in Fort Wayne, and he was 
active in that work during the remainder of his life. It is worthy of 
note that he was the owner of the first spring truck to be operated in 
his community, a fact that gives indication of a spirit of progress in 
him that has since been manifested in his son. Mr. Edmunds died in 
1874, at the early age of forty-six years. His wife was Mary Smith, 
also a daughter of Fort Wayne. They were the parents of four children, 
and their two living sons are Harry Edmunds, a resident of Chicago, 
and Frank W., mentioned above. Mrs. Edmunds was the grand-daughter 
of Conrad Smith, who had the distinction of having served from the 
first call to arms of the Minute Men through to the last day of the 
American Revolution. His great-grandson, Frank W. Edmunds, is the 
proud possessor of his official release from the service — a paper that is 
most interesting in character. Mr. Edmunds was born on November 23, 
1869, in Fort Wayne, and had his early education in his home city. 
He followed his common school training with a course of study in Fort 
Wayne Methodist College, after which he turned his attention to the 
study of telegraphy and for two years was engaged in that work. He 
then became occupied in civil engineering for a period of three years, 
after which he identified himself with the Fort Wayne Electric Works, 
where he continued for another three-j^ear period. In 1893 Mr. Edmunds 
launched out in the business world on his own responsibility, engaging 
in electrical construction work, and while he started on a small scale, 
as befitting his circumstances, he is to-day head of the oldest and largest 
business of its kind in the city of Fort Wayne, employing about sixteen 
persons. Other interests have claimed his attention, among which might 
be mentioned the Fresko Chemical Company, of which he is president. 
Mr. Edmunds is Republican in polities, and is a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of the Fort Wayne 
Country Club, and as a member of the local Commercial Club has been 
a factor in much of tlie development work that organization has insti- 
gated and carried to completion. In 1911 he married Miss Inez Cecil, 
of Rome City, Indiana, and they have two sons — Frank, Jr., and William. 

John W. Eggeman, .judge of the Circuit Court of Allen county, is one 
of the most infiuential factors in the development of the highest type of 
character in the youth of this populous community. His official duties 
as judge of the Circuit Court carry the responsibilities of judge of the 
juvenile court, and, in the performance of his work in the latter impor- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 157 

tant field, Judge Eggeman has found the deepest satisfaction, for the 
reason that it opens an incomprehensibly wide field of true usefulness. 
Scores of successful young men and women have been able to date the 
upward turn of their lives from the time the judge has heard their 
stories in court and given his best thought and attention to eliminating 
the conditions which have led them into error and wrong. Judge Egge- 
man was born in Fort Wayne, June 12, 1875, the son of Peter and Cath- 
erine (Niezer) Eggeman. Following his years of study in the parochial 
schools of the city, he attended Taylor University and then entered Notre 
Dame University. Here he not only became proficient in the several lines 
of study undertaken to fit him for a life of usefulness, but he attained 
wide fame as an athlete, notably on the football gridiron. As a youth 
of six feet and four inches in height, possessed of well-trained muscle 
guided by a quick-acting mind, his name was known throughout the 
world of athletics. He graduated from the law department of Notre 
Dame in 1900 and came immediately to his home city, where he engaged 
in the general practice of law. For several years he w^as associated 
with James B. Harper, a leading member of the bar of Allen county. 
In 1912 he was elected to serve as the judge of the Circuit Court, suc- 
ceeding Judge Edward O'Rourke, who had served on the bench for a 
period of thirty-six successive years. During the active years of Judge 
Eggeman 's service he has displayed highly-developed judicial qualifica- 
tions which include a keen mind, a knowledge of the spirit of the law, 
and a true sympathy which fits him to weigh carefully and justly the 
problems which come before him in his dual capacity. He is an active 
member of St. Patrick's Catholic parish. As a member of the Allen 
County Bar Association and one of the founders of the Blackford Club, 
he has rendered good service. On June 9, 1903, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary Wagner, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Kruse) Wag- 
ner, of Lafayette, Indiana. To this union have been born three children 
— John W., Jr., Robert F. and Mary E. Eggeman. In a recent public 
address Judge Eggeman presented his vieAvs on the question of child 
delinquency which portrays, perhaps, better than the words of another, 
the fine mind, the charitable sympathy and the determined purpose of 
the judge of the juvenile court, before whom are brought the boys and 
girls of Allen county for examination before other and more severe 
action can be taken. "Before two months had pased, after I had assumed 
the bench of the Circuit Court, I became convinced that knowledge of the 
intricacies of legal procedures was not the only important m.atter con- 
nected with the position," said he. "To my own satisfaction, at least, 
I soon learned that disputes over material things are not quite so impor- 
tant as endeavoring to make good citizens out of the boys and girls of 
our community, and if, during my term of office I shall have been instru- 
mental in having the fathers and mothers exercise the proper parental 
guidance and supervision of the habits of their children, and in instilling 
in the minds of the members of the different organizations I have ad- 
dressed a desire to help the children to make good, then I shall be 
extremely thankful. The proper bringing up of children is not a hobby, 
but a duty that is owing by every parent, for if we are to have capable 
and competent men and women we must first have good boys and girls." 
After entering deeply into the consideration of the influences of heredity 
and environment. Judge Eggeman gave his reasons for declaring that 
the surroundings of the child have a greater molding effect upon char- 



158 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

acter than ancestry. ' ' Crime, as such, is not transmitted from our ances- 
tors " declared Judge Eggeman. "A counterfeiter does not hand down 
a tendency to his offspring to make engraved plates any more than a 
pickpocket transmits his ability to steal purses from pockets with the 
skill that defies detection. The only things we acquire through heredity 
are color, form and structure. We do not inherit mathematical faculties 
or anything else that we have to acquire. A tendency to steal is no more 
inherited than a tendency to become a good telegrapher. Drunkenness 
is not inherited. It is only transitory. While it is true when parents are 
drunkards we ofttimes find the children drunkards, yet the cause is 
environment. The parents by example, if not expressly, teach their 
children to acquire a taste for alcohol." With his views thus expressed, 
Judge Eggeman appealed to his audience to unite in the great work of 
placing about the children and the youth the most healthful environ- 
ments to the end that those whose home surroundings are below the 
desired standard may be helped to the truest interpretation of manhood 
and womanhood. "The home," said he, "is where the child must receive 
its first training. It is remarkable to notice how children absorb and 
emulate. The conversation and habit of the parent are watched intently, 
and the manner in which they are reproduced by the children is aston- 
ishing. I could picture to you the homes that have come under my observ- 
ation. Homes that are hells. Homes of debauchery, drunkenness, dis- 
honesty and conflicts. Homes in which the child is taught to lie and steal 
by direct example. Where the environment is such that, no matter how 
healthy the brain of the child, it must of necessity become a criminal. 
Then I could picture to you the home where there is lack of supervision 
of the intimacies and friendships of the children; evil associations and 
a failure of the parents to keep in touch with their habits — lack of 
discipline, encouragement of extravagance and evil example under the 
parental roof. All these are factors in the spoiling of juvenile character. 
During the years of 1914 and 1915 we tried an average of two hundred 
cases each year in the juvenile court of this county and invariably the 
offenders were reared under the influence of such homes. Some tim.e ago, 
five boys were brought into court for stealing coal, not for the purpose 
of keeping warm but to secure money to turn over to their parents. 
Then we have the parents of the girls who permit them to wander through 
the streets, and the drift is inevitably downward. Most of the girls come 
from homes of ignorance coupled with vice. Wrong tendencies, lack of 
parental control and the lure of all the city's evil agencies combine to 
bring them to the attention of the law. In most cases, the trouble may 
be found after a short investigation of the home." Judge Eggeman closed 
his address by citing a large number of examples which have come under 
his observation, presenting the great good which has come through the 
conscientious use of his office and of the establishment of the probationary 
home in which the boys and girls are cared for amid good surroundings 
before the sentence to the reform school can be passed. Judge Eggeman 
in assigning relative importance to the good influences to be thrown about 
the child, placed the home first. "The next great factor is the Christian 
religion," said he. "The greatest force for civilization and good in the 
world to-day is the teaching of the lowly Nazarene." 

Albert Egly. — In 1906 Albert Egly brought about the organization 
of the Grabill State Bank, at which time he became cashier of the new 
institution. He has continued to hold that position down to the present 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 159 

time, and the success and well being of the bank has been largely attrib- 
uted to his work. He has been a resident of Grabill for the past fifteen 
years, coming here in 1901 as bookkeeper for a prominent grain concern, 
though other labors have claimed his attention between then and the 
time when he became identified with his present work. Mr. Egly was 
born in Adams county, Indiana, October 16, 1879, son of Samuel and 
Fannie (Schindler) Egly, both natives of Adams county and now living 
in Geneva. They became the parents of five children, of which the subject 
was the first born. The others are Adam, of Geneva ; Katherine, the wife 
of Ezra Rupel, of Geneva ; William, a professor in Bluffton College ; and 
Rachel, living at home. Albert Egly had the usual common school train- 
ing, followed by a course of study in a well known business college at 
Valparaiso, Indiana. When he was nineteen years old he engaged in 
teaching, in which work he was occupied for three years. In 1901 he 
came to Grabill as bookkeeper for a grain dealer and was in that position 
for a year. His next work was that of bookkeeper in the Peoples State 
Bank at Berne, Indiana, which post he held for three years, going thence 
to the S. F. Bowser Company as assistant manager of the collection de- 
partment of that firm. After one year in that connection he organized 
the Grabill State Bank, and since that time (1906) has been cashier of 
the bank. Mr. Egly is a Democrat, active in local politics, and a leader 
in the community that has become his home. He is secretary and treas- 
urer of the New Home Telephone Company, and holds a similar office in 
the Allen County Light and Power Company. He has been a potent 
force in the work of building up the educational standards of the town- 
ship and has served as secretary of the local school board for the past 
three years. On October 17, 1906, Mr. Egly was united in marriage with 
Miss Anna Stukey, who is of Ohio birth and parentage. They have two 
children — Robert Paul and Richard Samuel, The family have member- 
ship in the Christian church and are leaders in the work of that organi- 
zation in their community. 

Lewis G. Ellingham. — Since he has been a resident of Fort Wayne, 
beginning with June 1, 1916, when he assumed the active management 
of the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, Lewis G. Ellingham has entered 
with patriotic earnestness into every substantial effort to further the 
best interests of the people of this city and the region reached by the 
enterprising newspaper which he controls. Mr. Ellingham was born on 
a farm in Wells county, Indiana, February 23, 1868, son of Charles and 
Hannah (Scotton) Ellingham, both natives of England. The parents 
removed from the far mto Bluffton, Indiana, when "Lew," as he is 
popularly known, was a lad of six years. During several years, while 
he attended the Bluffton schools, Mr, Ellingham was employed in the 
office of the Bluffton Banner, where his liking for newspaper work was 
developed into the determination to make it his life work. While he 
was in his nineteenth year he purchased the Geneva (Indiana) Herald, 
which he conducted for three years, when he purchased the Winchester 
(Indiana) Democrat. After three years of service here, he established 
the Decatur (Indiana) Democratic Press. In 1896, the company pur- 
chased the Decatur Democrat and consolidated it with the Democratic 
Press and the combined publication was issued as the Democrat. Mr. 
Ellingham became the sole owner of the properties in 1897. He con- 
tinued the publication of the Democrat, which attained to a prominent 
and influential place in shaping the political and commercial affairs of- 



160 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the state, until June 1, 1916, when he removed to Fort Wayne to take 
active charge of the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, with Edward G. Hoff- 
man as an associate in the ownership of the publication. Mr. Ellingham 'a 
influence in the political affairs of the state is suggested by the fact that, 
in 1906 and 1908, he served as the Eighth district chairman of the Demo- 
cratic party with such marked ability as a leader that he became the 
unanimous choice of the Democrats of Indiana as their candidate for 
Secretary of State. In the election of 1910 Mr. Ellingham led his ticket 
and showed a plurality of about 13,000 votes. His service brought him 
a recognition of confidence, in 1912, and his vote was still larger. Mr. 
Ellingham 's second term ended December 1, 1914. On January 2, 1905, 
Mr. Ellingham was united in marriage with Miss Nellie Miller, daughter 
of Colonel and Mrs. M. B. Miller, of Winchester, Indiana. Two children 
— Winifred and Miller — have been born of this union. Mr. Ellingham 
is an active member of the Commercial Club of Fort Wayne and of the 
Fort Wayne Rotary Club. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, a Shriner, and a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and Elks Lodges. With the family 
he is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Fort Wayne. At the 
head of a newspaper of wide influence, Mr. Ellingham is unstinted in his 
devotion to the promotion of the welfare of his city and state. He has 
the right idea of the province of a newspaper, and this idea permeates 
the activities of every person connected with the institution. 

Thomas Emmet Ellison, lawyer, was born at LaGrange, Indiana, 
August 12, 1852, son of Andrew and Susan Miranda (Tuttle) Ellison. 
Andrew Ellison was born January 11, 1817, at Castlederg, County Tyrone, 
Ireland, of Scotish-Irish descent. His parents immigrated to America in 
1819, and resided in Western New York until 1885, when they came to 
LaGrange county, where they made their home the remainder of their 
lives. Andrew was determined to have an education, hence in homespun 
and homemade clothes, with a linen duster as a dress coat, he pursued his 
gtudies at the Ontario Collegiate Institute. The fact that his father was 
cheated out of a large body of land made him choose the law as a pro- 
fession. He walked to Wabash, Indiana, where he studied law for nearly 
a year in the office of Judge J. U. Pettit, and then went on to Indianapolis 
to be admitted to the bar, in 1843. He resided at LaGrange until his 
death, November 30, 1896. He was constantly in demand to try difficult 
and important litigations. He was especially strong before a jury. He 
travelled the circuit with the Judge, as they did in those days, attending 
court from forty-two to forty-six weeks in the year, unless it was a 
political year, when he gave up much of the time to political debate. He 
never held office, because he wanted to be free from all obligations. His 
practice in the Supreme Court was not exceeded by any lawyer in the 
Btate, from 1853 to 1870. He acquired considerable means and was noted 
for his generosity and high moral character throughout Northern Indiana. 
On his mother's side, Thomas E. Ellison was of Winslow descent, which 
family had much to do with the creation and growth of Massachusetts 
Colony. While the Winslows are frequently mentioned in English his- 
tory, they are best known because several came over in the Mayflower, 
in 1620, or soon thereafter. Edward AVinslow, born at Droitwitch, Eng- 
land, in 1560, was the father of nine children. Richard, the eldest, re- 
mained in England. Edward, the second, came to America, in 1620, in 
the Mayflower. He was afterward Governor of Plymouth Colony and a 
very important personage in the Massachusetts Colony. John came to 
America and Eleanore remained in England. Kenelm, Mr. Ellison's di- 




THOMAS E. ELLISON 



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FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 161 

rect ancestor, was born April 29, 1599, at Droitwitch, and died September 
13, 1672, at Salem, New England. Gilbert came to America on the May- 
flower, but afterwards returned to England. Elizabeth and Magdalen 
remained in England and Josiah came to Massachusetts, in 1629, and died 
there in 1636. Kenelm came to this country in the Mayflower, in 1620, 
and married Eleanore Adams in June, 1632. Of their four children, 
Kenelm was born about 1635, and died November 11, 1715. By his 
wife, Demaris, he had eleven children, and of these eleven, John was born 
about 1701, and died in 1755, having married Bethiah Andrews. Na- 
thaniel, the fourth of the nine children of John and Bethiah Andrews, 
was born April 22, 1730, and died June 6, 1778, having married Hannah 
Fitch. Nathaniel fell a victim of a prevailing epidemic while exerting 
his powerful influence in doing the service of the American armies in 
the Revolutionary war. (See Blake's Biographical Dictionary). He 
married Hannah Fitch, of Coventry, Conn., April 9, 1753, They had eleven 
children. The second, Hannah, was born February 14, 1757, and died 
May 28, 1802. She married Timothy Tuttle. "Timothy Tuttle was a 
eoldier in the Revolutionary army, in which he served five years and 
was engaged in many battles, such as Cow Pens, and after the war moved 
to Willistown, Vermont, then called the Green IVIountain Territory, and 
spent the remainder of his life as a farmer." Of their six children, Rich- 
mond, the fourth, was born February 20, 1790, and died at South Bend, 
Indiana, November 9, 1874. His wife was Lovina Morton, born May 6, 
1794, at Winslow, Conn., daughter of Diodate and Jemima Rockwell 
Morton. She died August 30, 1867, at Mishawaka, Indiana. In 1812, 
in the war between Great Britain and the United States, Richmond 
Tuttle was made sergeant in a company called "Dragoons," whose 
business was scouting and carrying dispatches. Two of his most intimate 
friends were arrested by the enemy and executed as spies and many in 
prominent Methodist and just before leaving Brockport, N. Y., he erected 
the company fell until it was reduced to sixteen. The company was in 
the battle of Ogdensburg at Sacketts Harbor. Mr. Tuttle was a very 
a fine Methodist church, for that time, as a reminder of his interest in 
the town where he had made his home many years. He settled in 
Mishawaka, Indiana, and was engaged in various business and many 
church enterprises until the time of his death. His eighth child, Susan 
Miranda was born September 13, 1829, at Brockport, N. Y. She was 
married to Andrew Ellison, August 4, 1851, and lived at LaGrange, In- 
diana, until her death in May, 1913, Thomas E. Ellison was a student at 
Notre Dame University, in 1868. He attended the University of Michigan 
in 1872-3-4, being a special of the literary department as well as a regular 
of the law department, receiving the degree of L. L. B, in 1874. He 
located in Fort Wayne as a partner of Judge Robert S. Lowry, in 1877, 
January 10, 1878, he married Emma Sophronia Stockbridge, who died 
March 23, 1884. They had three children : Robert died in infancy ; 
Phoebe, born September 20, 1880, married Warren Dupre Smith, head of 
the Department of Geology of the University of Oregon; and Andrew 
Winslow Stockbridge Ellison, born May 20, 1882, is now connected with 
the Ford Motor Co., of Detroit, Michigan. For a second wife, the subject 
of this memo, married Hannah Hall, of Topeka, Kan., Dec. 14, 1887. Mr, 
Ellison was admitted to the Indiana bar, December 23, 1873, while a 
resident of LaGrange, Indiana, and he moved to Fort Wayne in February, 
1877, and there he has resided ever since. He was admitted to the 
bar of the United States Circuit Court of Indiana in November, 1880, and 



162 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

to the United States Supreme Court in April, 1890. He was a member 
of the Board of State Charities of Indiana, 1892-9, and was Vice-Presi- 
dent of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections in May, 
1898, when it was held in New York City. He has written and delivered 
many addresses on sociological subjects. He was a member of the In- 
diana State Senate, 1895-9, and drew the present law as to care of de- 
pendent children, since adopted in principle by many of the states. He 
is also author of the law remodeling the penal system, establishing the 
, parole system and indeterminate sentence. These laws have been especi- 
ally commended by the International Prison Congress, etc. He was the 
first president of the Indiana Reformatory, and was a delegate to the In- 
ternational Prison Congress, held at Brussels, Belgium, in 1895, and at 
Washington, D. C, in 1916. He was also a delegate to the Universal 
Congress of Lawyers and Judges at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition 
at St. Louis, Mo., in 1904. He is a member of the American Bar Associa- 
tion and the Indiana Bar Association, is a Democrat in politics and has 
been prominent in promoting the construction of a waterway between 
Lake Erie and Michigan by the United States Government. 

Miss Julia E. Emanuel — It is specially gratifying to accord in this 
publication special recognition to Miss Emanuel, who is the proprietor 
and active manager of one of the admirably appointed and ably conducted 
drug stores of Fort Wayne, the same being designated as the Chemist 
Shop and being eligibly situated in attractive quarters at the corner of 
Berry and Harrison Streets, the designated number of the establishment 
being 201 West Berry Street. Miss Emanuel has shown marked technical 
ability in her chosen profession, for the work of which she carefully 
educated herself, and she has shown equal ambition and mature judgment 
as a business woman of exceptional resourcefulness and progressiveness. 
It may consistently be said that she has an inherent predilection for her 
present profession and business, for her father was an able physician 
and surgeon and after his death her mother became successful in the 
conducting of a drugstore in the former office building of the deceased 
husband and father. Miss Emanuel was born at Antwerp, Paulding 
county, Ohio, and is a daughter of Dr. Appeles D. and Emma C. (Kauff- 
man) Emanuel, her father having been a representative physician and 
surgeon in that county at the time of his death, in 1876, and his widow 
having thereafter developed in his former office a prosperous drug busi- 
ness, she having been a resident of Antwerp at the time of her death. 
In the public schools of her native village Miss Emanuel continued her 
studies until she had availed herself of the advantages of the high school, 
and she early began to assist in her mother's drugstore, in which she 
gained her initial knovv'ledge of practical pharmacy. Her self-reliant 
ambition was shown in her determination to prepare herself fully for 
the profession in which she has since achieved substantial and merited 
success, and she finally entered the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, in which she was graduated as a member of the class of 1889 
and from which she received the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. In 
1892 Miss Emanuel came to Fort Wayne and for the ensuing ten years 
was employed in the prescription department in the drugstore of Meyer 
Brothers, her abiltiy as a chemist and her scrupulous care in the com- 
pounding of prescriptions having gained to her the confidence and high 
esteem of the local representatives of the medical profession as well as 
of the general public. In 1902 she established her independent business 
enterprise as a pharmacist, and in 1907 she removed from her original 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 163 

quarters in the Arcade building to her present location, where she has 
built up a large and representative trade in the handling of drugs, chem- 
icals, toilet articles and general lines of druggist's sundries, and with 
a most modern and complete prescription department in which the best 
of service is given. Miss Emanuel is popular in both business and social 
circles in Fort Wayne and is distinctly a woman of gracious personality, 
even as she is one of marked business ability. 

Stephen C. Emenhiser has been a resident of Allen county from the 
time of his birth, is a scion of an honored pioneer family, and is to-day 
one of the representative farmers and stock-growers of Jackson township, 
where he is the owner of a well-improved farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres. He purchased this place when he was a young man and shortly 
prior to his marriage, and his devoted young wife proved his efficicent 
coadjutor when he set to himself the arduous task of reclaiming the 
land to cultivation, the entire tract having been covered with heavy 
timber at the time when it came into his possession. Thus through his 
energy and good management have been made all the improvements 
that now mark the place as a model farm, the house, barns and other 
farm buildings having been erected by him and independence and pros- 
perity having crowned his well-ordered endeavors. In connection with 
diversified agriculture Mr. Emenhiser raises live stock of the better type, 
including full-blooded Shropshire sheep and Poland-China swine. Mr. 
Emenhiser has not only been one of the world's productive workers, but 
has also stood exponent of broad-minded and progressive citizenship. 
He served one year as township supervisor and for the long period of 
sixteen years was an influential and valued member of the advisory board 
of Allen county. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party, 
he v/as formerly in active affiliation with the Improved Order of Red 
Men, and he and his wife are earnest members of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church at Monroeville, from which village they have service on rural 
mail route No. 1. Mr. Emenhiser was born in Madison township, this 
county, on March 2, 1865, and is a son of Joseph and Adeline (Clark) 
Emenhiser, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania, of German 
ancestry, and the latter in Virginia, of English lineage. The marriage 
of the parents was solemnized in the state of Ohio, whence they came 
to Allen county more than half a century ago and established their home 
on a pioneer farm in Madison township, where they passed the remainder 
of their lives, in the meanwhile contributing a worthy quota to the social 
and industrial development and progress of the county. Of their fine 
family of sixteen children the first born died in infancy; Adam is now 
deceased ; Katherine was the third in order of birth ; James is deceased ; 
Mrs. Ameria Smith resides in Hoagland, Indiana ; Joseph is deceased ; 
Mrs. Jennie Tood resides in Richmond, Indiana; John is a resident of 
Jackson township; Adeline is deceased; William is a resident of Texas; 
Mrs. Abigail Stoneburner resides in Hoagland; Stephen C, of this review, 
was the next in order of birth ; Mrs. Sarah Kantro maintains her home 
in New York, and Mrs. Minnie Bardey in Buffalo, New York; David is 
a resident of Hoagland and his twin sister, Delilah, is deceased. Stephen 
C. Emenhiser acquired his early education in the pioneer schools of Mad- 
ison township and in the meanwhile assisted in the reclamation and other 
work of the home farm. He has never severed his allegiance to the 
great basic industry of husbandry and has for many years been one 
of the vigorous exemplars of farm enterprise in his native county, as 



164 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

intimated in a preceding division of this article. On October 18, 1890, 
he married Miss Emma Davidson, daughter of Richard and Mary (Liv- 
inston) Davidson, who were born and reared in Licking county, Ohio, 
and who came to Allen county, Indiana, in 1888. They here resided 
four years on a farm in Jefferson township and then removed to Kalida, 
Putnam county, Ohio, where the father passed the remainder of his life 
and where the widowed mother still resides. Of the children the eldest, 
Marion, is a resident of Grand Rapids, Michigan; Mrs. Ella Pritchard 
lives in Ohio ; Mrs. Emenhiser was the third child ; John and Homer reside 
in Ohio, the former in the city of Toledo; Mrs. Maude Pratt likewise is 
a resident of Toledo; James is deceased; Richard is a resident of Bay 
City, Michigan, and William is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Emenhiser have 
seven children: Mrs. Grace Fernet, Mrs. Ada Starehime, Charles, Au- 
gustus, Leonard, Stella and Homer. Edward, the fifth child, is deceased, 
and Augustus, Leonard, Stella and Homer remain at the parental home. 

William Emme came direct from his home in Germany to Fort 
Wayne, where he readily found employment at his trade of cabinet- 
maker. He was employed constantly by the Pennsylvania Railroad from 
about 1881. He was born in Germany on March 14, 1848, and his parents 
were Henry and Christina (Toensing) Emme, both deceased. The father 
died when William Emme was three years old, and the other children 
left fatherless at that time were Diederick, now living in Germany ; Henry, 
Sophia and Pauline, all deceased. When he was fourteen years old Wil- 
liam Emme was apprenticed to a cabinet-maker in his native community, 
and he was twenty-four years old when he came to America. After 
he settled in Fort Wayne he engaged in the carpentering and contracting 
business and was thus occupied for about nine years, when he found 
permanent employment in the cabinet work department of the Penn- 
sylvania road. Mr. Emme is employed in the finer work on the coaches, 
where the skill of a cabinet-maker is in demand. He was pensioned by 
the company on June 20, 1915. In September, 1876, Mr. Emme was 
married to Miss Minnie Vollmerding, who, like himself, was born in 
Germany. Their children are Minnie, Sophia, Fred and Carrie. All 
four live at home with the parents, and Fred is employed by the Fort ' 
Wayne Foundry and Machine Company. The family are members of 
St. Paul's Lutheran Church, and have a wide circle of friends in the 
city that has been their home these many years. 

Franklin A. Emrick. — In according consideration in this history to 
those whose ability, character and services have given them assured 
prestige as representative members of the Allen county bar, there is 
special reason for offering more than casvial recognition to Mr. Emrick, 
who has served as prosecuting attorney of the county and who has made 
an enviable record in this office — as a determined, resourceful and well- 
fortified trial laAvyer and as one signally loyal to the public trust reposed 
in him and to the profession in which he has achieved merited success. 
Not only technical ability but also hard and persistent work are the 
mediums through which consistent advancement is made in the legal 
profession, and Mr. Emrick has lived up to the requirements that insure 
such prestige. He was born in Pleasant township, -this county, on Jan- 
uary 30, 1873, and is a son of John P. and Catherine (McFillen) Emrick, 
who have for many years been substantial farmers and honored citizens 
of Allen county. In the public schools of his native county Franklin A. 
Emrick continued his studies until he had completed the curriculum of 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 165 

the Ann Arbor (Michigan) high school, and in the meanwhile he had 
formulated definite plans for his future career. He began the study 
of law under effective private preceptorship and was admitted to practice 
in 1899, but he did not hold as adequate aught else than the most thor- 
ough preparation for his chosen vocation, with the result that he entered 
the literary department of the University of Michigan for one year and 
then the law department of the same university, at Ann Arbor, leaving 
there to accept the office of Deputy Prosecuting Attorney in 1899. Of 
this position he continued the incumbent until January 1, 1904, when he 
engaged in the general practice of law in Fort Wayne, in partnership 
with his brother, E. V. Emrick. Within the ensuing decade he was 
identified with a large amount of important litigation in the courts of 
this section of Indiana and by his decisive victories added materially 
to his reputation as a versatile advocate. His ability and his former 
official experience marked him as a logical candidate for the office of 
prosecuting attorney of his native county, to which position he was 
elected in the autumn of 1914 and of which he continued the efficient 
incumbent until his term expired, December 31, 1917. As public pros- 
ecutor he achieved results with the maximum of speed and the minimum 
of friction, with the result that his record constitutes a worthy part of 
governmental and legal history of Allen county. Mr. Emrick is a stalwart 
advocate of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party 
stands sponsor and he has been active and influential in political affairs 
in his native county. In the Masonic fraternity he has rounded the circle 
of each the York and Scottish Rites, besides being affiliated with the 
Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is actively iden- 
tified also with the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order 
of Moose, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the National Union. On 
June 24, 1904, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Emrick to Miss Mary 
Ellen Hile, daughter of George Hile, a well-known citizen of Garrett, 
DeKalb county, and the two children of this union are Franklin A., Jr., 
and Mary Catherine. 

William Emrich, who now lives retired in his attractive home at 
Huntertown, is one of the venerable and honored citizens of Allen county, 
within whose borders he has resided since his early youth, a scion of one 
of the sterling German pioneer families who here settled more than sixty 
years ago, and he has been one of the vigorous and successful exponents 
of agricultural enterprise in the country, his old homestead farm, of one 
hundred and ten acres, having been developed and improved under his 
energetic management and being one of the fine farms of Perry township. 
He still owns the property, which is now under the active management of 
his youngest son, Frank E. Mr. Emrich was born in Baden, Germany, 
December 17, 1838, a son of Franz and Elizabeth (Hockerberger) Emrich, 
who came with their children to America in 1852, remained for an 
interval in Pennsylvania, then removed to Stark county, Ohio, whence, 
about eighteen months later, they came to Allen county, Indiana. The 
family home was established on a little farm of thirty acres, in Spring- 
field township, and at the time only two acres of the tract had been 
cleared. With the passing years Franz Emrich achieved independence 
and success through his association with ^agricultural industry, and both 
he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives in this country, their 
religious faith having been that of the Lutheran church. Of the three 



166 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

children, the eldest was Elizabeth, whose death occurred in 1905 ; the sub- 
ject of this review was the next in order of birth ; and George is a resident 
of Cedar Creek township, this county. William Emrich acquired his 
early education in the schools of his native land and was a lad of four- 
teen years at the time of the family immigration to the United States. 
In Starke county. Ohio, he attended school two months, and hi broader 
education has been gained under the direction of that greatest of all 
head-masters, experience. Upon the removal of the family to Allen 
county he became his father's energetic assistant in the work of the home 
farm, and later was employed for twelve years on neighboring farms in 
Springfield township. Frugal and industrious, he carefully conserved 
his financial resources and eventually was enabled to purchase the fine 
homestead farm which he still owns, in Perry township. The present sub- 
stantial improvements on the place were made by him and he long held 
precedence as one of the enterprising and substantial exponents of agri- 
cultural and live-stock industry in Perry township. In October. 1907, he 
retired from the farm and removed to Huntertown, where he now oc- 
cupies his attractive and modern home, on Hunter street, the house hav- 
ing been erected by him and being of cement-block construction. His 
second wife died, in 1909, and Mrs. Amanda Friece now has charge of 
the domestic affairs of his home. In his young manhood, Mr. Emrich 
wedded ]\Iiss ]\Iargaret Holcwarth, who was born in Germany, a daughter 
of Daniel and Barbara Holcwarth, who settled in Ohio upon coming to 
America and thence came to Allen county and established their home in 
Springfield township, where they passed the residue of their lives. ]\Irs. 
Emrich died, February 15, 1871. at the birth of her daughter Sarah. She 
was the mother of five children, all of whom are living, namely: Mrs. 
Elizabeth "Worley ; John, of Perry township ; Martin, of Fort AVayne ; 
Charles, a resident of Ohio, and Mrs. Sarah Parker, of Perry township. 
Mr. Emrich married for his second wife Miss Ellen Boger, who was born 
in Ohio, a daughter of Peter and Catherine (Gruber) Boger, who were 
natives of Germany and. came from Ohio to Allen county, Indiana, in an 
early day, their home having been in Springfield to^TUship at the time of 
their death. Mrs. Ellen Emrich passed to the life eternal on January 
22, 1909, and is survived by two children, Harry A., who is a resident 
of Fort Wayne, and Frank E., who remains on the old homestead farm, 
in Perry township. William Emrich has always given his political al- 
legiance to the Democratic party, and while living on his farm he and 
his wife were aetiA^e members of the Reformed Lutheran church in 
Springfield township. 

William M. Enslen, M. D., has achieved in his profession the success 
and precedence that are to be gained only through ability, close and 
conscientious application and unselfish stewardship that indicates sub- 
jective appreciation of the dignity and responsibility of a profession that 
touches the very destinies of life itself. Doctor Enslen has been estab- 
lished in successful general practice in the city of Fort Wayne for more 
than a quarter of a century, and the broad scope and representative 
nature of his professional business indicate alike his ability as a physician 
and surgeon and his strong hold upon popular confidence and esteem. 
The Doctor was born in Allen county, Ohio, October 16, 1863, and is a 
son of John and ]\Iary (Shutts) Enslen, both of Avhom continued to reside 
in that county until their death and the remains of both rest in the family 
graveyard on the old homestead farm. John Enslen was one of the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 167 

substantial farmers and honored and influential citizens of Allen county, 
Ohio, was a Democrat in politics and though he had no ambition for 
public office he served six years as a member of the board of directors 
of the county farm and infirmary in Allen county, Ohio. He was the 
first man in that county to own and operate a threshing machine in 
which steam power was utilized, and he was a progressive and liberal 
citizen who did much to further the civic and industrial advancement 
of the county in which he passed the greater part of his life, his parents 
having established their home in Allen county in 1831 and he having 
assisted in the reclamation and development of the pioneer farm. Both 
he and his wife were earnest and consistent members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Of the eight children Doctor Enslen, of this review, 
was the fifth in order of birth ; Edward, the first born, is deceased ; John 
H. remains in the old home county and is a prosperous merchant in the 
village of Elida; Columbus E. and Frank M. are twins, the latter a 
bachelor, and both are locomotive engineers in the service of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company; George S. is engaged in the mercantile 
business at Lima, the county seat of Allen county, Ohio; Carrie Delia 
is the wife of William Price, a successful farmer of Allen county, Ohio ; 
and Rosa is the widow of John Summers, who was engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at Kalida, Putnam county, Ohio, at the time of his death. 
Dr. William M. Enslen, like many another who has attained to prom- 
inence in professional life, found the period of his childhood and early 
youth compassed by the benignant influences of the farm, and in the 
meanwhile his alert mentality enabled him to derive the maximum bene- 
fits from the advantages afforded him in the public schools. He later 
attended the institution that is now known as Valparaiso University, 
at Valparaiso, Indiana, and for several years gave effective service as 
a teacher in the public schools, principally in rural districts in Ohio. 
He completed a course in medicine in the Fort Wayne Medical College, 
and while engaged in teaching school began the study of medicine, under 
the preceptorship of Doctor Jones, of Gomer, a village in his native 
county. He came to Fort Wayne and continued his studies under the 
direction of Doctor Stemen, and finally entered the Fort Wayne Med- 
ical College, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1890, and from which he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
During the long intervening years he has continued in the active practice 
of his profession in Fort Wayne, and his status is such as to mark him 
as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of this part of 
the state. The Doctor retains membership in the American 
Medical Association, the Tri-State Medical Society, the Indiana State 
Medical Society, the Twelfth District Medical Society, and the Allen 
County Medical Society. The Doctor is prominently affiliated with both 
the York and Scottish Rite organizations of the Masonic fraternity, 
and the Mizpah Temple, A. A. 0., N. M. S., he being a member of the 
first class to take the degrees in this temple. He is a Democrat in his 
political allegiance and as a public-spirited and loyal citizen gave effective 
service during the four years he represented the Sixth Ward, of Fort 
Wayne, as a member of the city council. He and his wife are zealous 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church and he was specially prom- 
inent and influential in the building of the new edifice of the Simpson 
Methodist Episcopal church in Fort Wayne. On October 15, 1891, was 
solemnized the marriage of Doctor Enslen to Miss Eva Leist, daughter 



168 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of George R. Leist, of Elida, Ohio, and the two children of this union 
are Helen and Myron, 

Sankey Everson is vice-president of the Union Grain & Coal Com- 
pany and has the general management of its modern grain elevator and 
business in the village of Edgerton, Jackson township. The company 
operates also a grist mill and elevator at Payne, Ohio, and bases its oper- 
ations on a capital stock of thirty thousand dollars. Herman H. Roose, 
of Fort AYayue, is president of the company and J. Y. Stimmel is secre- 
tary and treasurer, as well as manager of the mill and elevator at Payne, 
Ohio. The company was organized about 1903 and was originally in- 
corporated A\ith a capital stock of sixty thousand dollars. The company 
originally operated not only its present mill and elevators, but also a 
second elevator and an electric light plant at Payne, Ohio, as well as an 
elevator at AVorstville, Paulding county, Ohio. Of the extra properties 
the company disposed when it was found expedient to concentrate the 
business in the present plants, and simultaneously the capital stock was 
reduced to its present but ample figure. Adjacent to the village of Edger- 
ton, Mr. Everson owns a fine farm of one hiindred and twenty-five acres, 
upon which he has made the best improvements, including the erection 
of the modern house which constitutes the attractive and hospitable 
family home, besides which he has otherwise brought the place up to 
high standard. In connection with his other business activities Mr. Ever- 
son has developed a prosperous subsidiary enterprise in the handling of 
automobile accessories, besides being local agent for the Jackson auto- 
mobile. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party, and at 
Payne, Paulding county, Ohio, he is afiiliated with the Knights of Pythias 
and the lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted ]\Iasons. He attends and 
supports the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his ■wife is an active 
member. Mr. Everson was born in Sehleswig-Holstein, Germany, No- 
vember 19, 1871, and there received his early educational discipline under 
the wonderfully thorough German system. He was thirteen years of age 
when, in 1884, he accompanied his parents, John and Hannah (Dauklef- 
son) Everson, on their immigration to the United States, and the family 
home was established on a farm in Paulding county, Ohio, much of the 
land being still covered with a heavy growth of timber, so that he had 
experience in the arduous work of clearing and reclaiming a number of 
acres and making the same available for cultivation. The parents resided 
on his farm about ten years, passed the ensuing eight years at Edgerton, 
Allen county, Indiana, and then removed to Michigan, in which state they 
now reside on their excellent farm near Newberry, Luce county. Of their 
children the subject of this review is the eldest : Momme lives at Port 
Clinton, Ohio; and Christ, Mrs. Margaret Frederick, August, and Mrs. 
Sophia McClain reside in Michigan. After coming to the United States 
Sankey Everson continued his active association with farm industry until 
he was twenty-one years of age, when he found employment in a stave 
mill at Edgerton, where he later became manager of the grain elevator of 
which he still has the supervision, as vice-president of the company con- 
trolling the same. In September. 1896, he wedded Miss ]\Iarilla Heide- 
breicht, who was born and reared in Allen county, a daughter of Henry 
and Henrietta Heidebreicht, who now reside in Edgerton. Mr. Heide- 
breicht was born in Germany, was young when the family came to 
America and his marriage was solemnized in Michigan, in which state his 
wife was born. He served as a valiant soldier of the Union in the Civil 
war and has ever shown the same spirit of loyalty in the piping times of 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 169 

peace as has he also when our nation has recently become involved in 
the terrific European war. He was formerly identified with the operation 
of a stave mill in Jackson township, this country, besides -w^hich he and 
his wife conducted for a number of years a popular boarding house at 
Edgerton, where they are now living in well earned retirement and 
comfort. Of their four children the eldest is Mrs. Lillie Roose, of Fort 
"Wayne ; Henry A. is superintendent of a stave mill at McMillan, Mich- 
igan; Mrs. Carrie Phillips resides in Fort Wayne; and Mrs. Everson is 
the youngest of the number. Mr, and Mrs. Everson have three children 
— Czerney L., Minta, and Lillian. 

Edgar D. Eward has been identified more or less successfully with 
various business enterprises, but his latest venture seems to be the one 
that is most satisfactory to him and the one in which he will find 
activity for the coming years. He came to Fort W^ayne in 1913 in the 
interests of the Consumers' Ice Company, and he has lately arisen to 
the post of secretary-treasurer and manager of the local concern. The 
term "self-made" is so hackneyed that one hesitates to apply it in any 
instance, but the fact remains that Mr. Eward is himself mainly respon- 
sible for such success as has been his portion thus far. He was born 
in Converse, Indiana, on December 18, 1869, and is the son of John 
W. and Rebecca Jane (York) Eward, natives of Virginia and Indiana, 
respectively^ Mrs. Eward is the daughter of Alfred York, a pioneer 
of Indiana, who entered land in the vicinity of Monroe in the early days 
of Indiana settlement, and he rode horselsack through a dense swamp 
from his location in Grant county to Fort Wayne when he went to that 
point to prove up on his homestead and get his patent. John W. Eward, 
now living retired at the old home in Converse, practiced law in the 
early days and was fairly prosperous for his time. He was postmaster 
at Converse for eight years, and at the present writing is a director in 
his local bank, and takes an active interest in the affairs of the com- 
munity, though now in the eightieth year of his life. His life companion 
still lives and they are enjoying a serene old age in the place that has 
been their home and the center of their activity for these many years. 
Five children were born to them. Jessie, the eldest, is the wife of Harry 
Smith, of SanAntonio, Texas. Edgar of this review is the second born. 
Fred 0. is engaged in the ice and cold-storage business in Marion, Indiana. 
Homer, the fourth child, died in infancy and Albert died in boyhood. 
It was a theory of the elder Eward that his sons, being able bodied and 
possessing health and strength, should make some contribution to their 
support as soon as they were able to become earners in some degree, 
and it was expected of the boys that they should earn their own clothes. 
This rule, while it was doubtless something of a hardship to the boys in 
a way, may safely be said to have been a corrective influence in their 
young lives and to have had a tendency to character building that more 
indulgent methods might not have engendered. When Edgar Eward 
was twelve years old his father bought a farm in the vicinity of their 
home and as a boy he spent much of his time at work on the place. 
The first actual money he ever earned came from his labors on the 
farm hauling rock, a pastime that many a farmer boy recalls with mingled 
feelings of pride and resentment, but not all of them can look back to 
the possession of thirty dollars as a reward for the stone bruises and 
back aches that accrued from the work. With this sum of money he 
bought three calves, and from then on he was a stock dealer on a smaU 



170 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

scale, and realized both pleasure and profit from his activities in that 
work. "When he was eighteen years old he moved back to town from 
the farm and found employment in a harness shop at the meagre wage 
of three dollars a week. One year of that work sufficed and he next 
engaged himself with his uncle in the glass business, where he earned 
fifteen dollars weekly. He continued with his uncle for three years, 
learning the glass blower's trade in that time, and for the next ten 
years was engaged in that work. He left it to engage in the livery 
business in Matthews, Indiana, but after eight months of that he went 
back to Converse and there conducted a similar enterprise for the next 
four years. His next move took him to Marion, where he carried on 
a successful business in chattel loans for about four years. In 1913 
he came to Fort Wayne, here to engage in his present business as man- 
ager of the Consumers' Ice Company, as has been previously stated. 
Mr. Eward was married on March 17, 1898, to Miss Tressie Zirkle, a 
young woman of many excellent qualities of heart and mind and a native 
daughter of Indiana. They have two children — Harold and Helen. Mr. 
Eward is a Republican in politics, and his fraternal affiliations are with 
the Knights of Pythias, the Elks and the Modern Woodmen and the 
Maccabees. 

Daniel M. Falls.— The firm of Bowser, Prentis & Falls has controlled 
a successful business in the installing of machinery and in its line has 
held precedence as one of the most important concerns of the kind in 
Northern Indiana. The late Daniel ]M. Falls was employed by the firm 
for a number of years before he became a member thereof and played an 
influential part in the development of the business. This firm had the 
distinction of having installed the machinery used at the Centennial Ex- 
position of 1876, and Mr. Palls was in charge of this important work in 
the city of Philadelphia. He continued as a member of the firm and as 
one of the prominent and honorable business men of Fort Wayne until 
his death, which occurred December 16, 1916. Mr. Falls was born in 
Pennsylvania, July 3, 1832, and thus was more than eighty years of age 
at the time of his death. He was a son of Thomas and Barbara (Staufer) 
Falls, both natives of Germany. The father "v^ias a cabinetmaker and came 
to Fort Wayne in 1843. both he and his wife having passed the remainder 
of their lives in Allen county and of their nine children the subject of this 
memoir was the last to survive. As a youth Daniel M. Falls learned the 
trade of blacksmith, but after having been employed at this trade about 
two years he became associated with the firm in which eventually he 
purchased an interest and with which he continued his connection until 
his death. For some time he was engaged also in the rendering business, 
but he retired from that field of enterprise in 1905. His old home, in 
which his death occurred, was erected by him in 1863, and there he con- 
tinued his residence during the long intervening years. Mr. Falls married 
Margaret Gormely, a native of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and they became 
the parents of four children — Charles M., George E., Oliver M. and Etta F. 
The three first named are deceased and Etta F. is the wife of Calvin K. 
Rieman, who is factory manager of the S. M. Foster Shirtwaist Company, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rieman have one child, Carrie K. Mrs. Falls passed to the 
life eternal, February 22, 1916, and her husband survived her by less 
than a year, so that in death they were not long divided. Both were 
earnest communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church, and Mr. Falls 
was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, besides having been a charter 
member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 171 

Earl D. Farr has so applied his technical and executive ability as 
to win for himself the responsible office of manager of the large and 
important manufacturing plant of The Boss Manufacturing Company 
in the city of Fort Wayne, and he is one of the alert, progressive and 
popular young business men of the Allen county metropolis. Mr. Farr 
was born in Fulton county, Illinois, on January 5, 1882, and is a son 
of John and Peninah (Cain) Farr, the former a native of Ohio and the 
latter of Illinois. The father became a successful exponent of agricul- 
tural industry in Fulton county, Illinois, where he is now living retired, 
his wife having been summoned to the life eternal several years ago. 
Of their children the first, Arthur, died in infancy ; Bertha is the wife 
of Albert K. Tate and they now reside in the city of Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia ; Cooper C. resides at Kewanee, Illinois ; and the subject of this 
sketch is the youngest of the number. Earl D. Farr continued his studies 
in the public schools of his native county until he had duly profited 
by the advantages afforded in the township high school, and in the 
meanwhile he gave practical assistance in the work and management of 
the home farm. At the age of eighteen years he found employment in 
an Illinois manufactory of farm implements, and later was associated 
with the printing business conducted by his brother-in-law, Mr. Tate. 
After severing this alliance he was employed about nine years by the 
Western Tube Company, at Kewanee, Illinois, and at the same place 
he then entered the service of the Boss Manufacturing Company, which, 
in 1912, transferred him to its headquarters in Fort Wayne, where he 
has since given effective service as manager of the company's well- 
equipped manufacturing plant. Mr. Farr pays his political allegiance to 
the Republican party, is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and he 
and his wife hold membership in the Baptist church. June 7, 1905, 
recorded the marriage of Mr. Farr to Miss Lenna E. Radford, who was 
born and reared at Kewanee, Henry county, Illinois, and they have three 
children — Beatrice J., Lillian E., and John R. 

Adrian E. Fauve, M. D., has been engaged in the practice of his 
profession at Fort Wayne since 1906 and his recognized ability and 
gracious personality mark him as one of the representative physicians 
and surgeons of this section of the Hoosier state. The Doctor is a scion 
of fine French stock and takes pride in claiming beautiful France as 
the place of his nativity, his parents, Louis and Eulalie (Monin) Fauve, 
being still residents of Bourges, France, where the father is now in the 
consular service, doing all in his power to uphold his native land in its 
bitter struggle with opposing forces in the great conflict that is now 
ravaging and devastating so many European countries. Doctor Fauve 
was born in Bourges, France, on March 5, 1878, and is the younger in 
a family of two children, his elder brother, Eugene, being in active 
service as a gallant soldier of France in the great European war that 
is raging at the time of this writing, in the spring of 1917. Doctor 
Fauve was afforded in his native land excellent educational advan- 
tages along both academic and professional lines, and he came to America 
in 1896. He has been indefatigable in fortifying himself for his profession 
in consonance with its highest modern standards, and he received his 
degree of Doctor of Medicine from one of the leading institutions of 
France. Since establishing his home in the United States he has taken 
effective post-graduate courses in medical institutions both in Indian- 
apolis and Chicago, in which former city he was engaged in the practice 



172 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of his profession about one year. In 1906 he established himself in gen- 
eral practice at Fort Wayne, and here he has built up a substantial 
and representative practice, in which he now gives special attention to 
the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases of the stomach and other 
digestive organs. His success has been on a parity with his enthusiasm 
and earnest effort and he has gained high standing in the esteem of 
his professional confreres. He is actively identified with the American 
Medical Association, the Indiana State Medical Society, the Twelfth 
District Medical Society, and the Allen County Medical Society. He 
is a member of the Medical Reserve Corps of the United States army 
with the rank of first lieutenant. He is affiliated with both the York and 
Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity. On June 29, 1904, was 
solemnized the marriage of Doctor Fauve to Miss Mary Etta Juilliard, 
who was born at Canton, Ohio, and who is of French descent on both 
the paternal and distaff sides. She is a woman of distinctive culture and 
talent, having received the advantages of both American and French 
educational institutions, including those of the convent at Oiseaux, France, 
and having developed her musical talent through effective study in both 
America and France. A woman of fine social qualities and gracious 
presence, she is a popular figure in the representative social life of 
Fort Wayne. Doctor and Mrs. Fauve have no children. 

Franklin J. Federspiel, who conducts a successful and representative 
general insurance business in Fort AVayne, is a scion of the third gener- 
ation of the Federspiel family in Allen county, and his father, who like- 
wise was born and reared in Allen county, where he lived retired in the 
village of New Haven, St. Joseph township until his death, was long 
and successfully engaged in the conducting of a blacksmith and repair 
shop, as a skilled artisan and as a man whose fine physical powers found 
effective balance in his sterling character and strong mentality. The 
lineage of the Federspiel family traces back to patrician sources in 
Germany and Switzerland, and it is specially gratifying at this juncture 
to enter the following data, which are taken from the archives of the 
official records of the town of Chur, Germany: "The old, noble and 
aristocratic family of Federspiel comes originally from Switzerland 
(1257), the Canton Graubundten, where Ulricus von Federspiel first 
became distinguished. The aforesaid ruled the Bishopric Church in a 
praiseworthy fashion and by this he became Freiherr (Baron), which 
the descendants carried on. Yohan Anton Freiherr von Federspiel .was 
then, in the year 1759, made Canon of Chur. Later this family spread 
out to north Germany. The main colors of the coat-of-arms are silver 
and blue. Blue in the coat-of-arms means consistency and true devotion 
towards God. Silver signifies purity, wisdom and innocence. The wings 
on the helmet mean that the family through praiseworthy deeds raised 
itself up. The snake is the symbol of wisdom, craft and unity. Taken 
from Professor Tauhis' Dictionary of Heraldry and the General Heraldry 
Knowledge of Europe, Vo. V., page 184, Philip Warwitz, heralder and 
genealogist. Von Federspiel, a Swiss family, from which, as Castle- 
Colonnel, Lucius Rudolph von Federspiel, in the year 1718, was made 
a noble. ' ' Baltzer Federspiel, grandfather of him whose name introduces 
this article, was born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, in 1815, and came to 
America when about fifteen years of age. He settled in New York and 
when about twenty-one years of age came to Indiana and settled in 
Allen county. He was a blacksmith by trade and as he found a well- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 173 

established blacksmith shop in Fort Wayne he went to New Haven, 
in which village he opened a shop and became a pioneer blacksmith of 
Adams township, both he and his wife having here remained until their 
death and his name meriting enduring place on the roll of the honored 
pioneers of Allen county. Joseph Federspiel, father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born at New Haven, this county. Here he maintained 
his home and was virtually his father's successor in the blacksmithing 
business. He followed his sturdy trade for many years. He was a 
Democrat in politics and was from his youth an earnest communicant 
of the Catholic church. As a young man he wedded Miss Catherine 
Poiry, who was born in Ohio, and her death occurred in 1888. The 
three children of this union are George C, Frederick B. and Franklin J,, 
all of whom now reside in Fort Wayne. For his second wife Joseph 
Federspiel married Miss Helen Huth, who is still living, and of this 
union were born one son and three daughters : Alfred is a resident of 
New Haven; Catherine is the wife of Alban Schelkner, of New 
Haven; Clara is the wife of Albert Welling, of New Haven; 
and Marie is employed as a stenographer in the Dreibelbiss abstract 
offices, in Fort Wayne. Joseph Federspiel died November 30, 1916. 
Franklin Joseph Federspiel, the immediate subject of this review, was 
born at New Haven, this county, March 29, 1877, and he continued his 
studies in the parochial schools of St. John's Catholic church in that 
village until he had completed the curriculum thereof. In 1898 he 
established his residence in Fort Wayne, where he entered the employ 
of Francis X. Schuhler, who was here engaged in the insurance business 
and who had developed a substantial enterprise as representative of lead- 
ing fire, life and accident insurance companies. Upon the death of Mr, 
Schuhler, in 1906, Mr. Federspiel succeeded to the business, and he has 
since continued the same with unequivocal success, his clientage being 
of representative character and the business showing a constantly cumu- 
lative tendency under his vigorous and effective direction. He gives 
his political allegiance to the Democratic party, both he and his wife 
are zealous communicants of the parish of St. Patrick's Catholic church, 
and he is affiliated with the folloAving named and representative organ- 
izations : The Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Knights of America, 
the Holy Name Society, the Catholic Benevolent League of Indiana, the 
French-American Society, the National Union and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. On September 10, 1901, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Federspiel to Miss Justina Poiry, daughter of Peter 
Poiry, who was for many years in the employ of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company. Mr. and Mrs. Federspiel have six children, namely: 
Lucille, Florence, Genevieve, Dorothy, Virginia, and Frank Joseph, Jr. 

Charles Feichter has proved himself possessed of that ambition and 
resourcefulness which make for success in every line of human endeavor 
and in his native county has found satisfaction and profit in his continued 
allegiance to the great basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing, 
of which he is one of the progressive and popular exponents in St. Joseph 
township, where his homestead farm is a well improved and productive 
place of forty acres. His parents — Jacob and Rachel Feichter — natives 
of Germany, may consistently be said to have been pioneers of Allen 
county, both having been young folks at the time of coming to the county 
and their marriage having here been solemnized. They established their 
home on a farm in Lafayette township and there passed the remainder of 



174 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

their earnest and useful lives, secure in the respect and good A\ill of all 
who knew them. They became the parents of four children — Mary, 
Lydia, Jacob H., and Charles. He whose name initiates this paragraph 
learned at first hand the mysteries and intricacies of agricultural in- 
dustry, for he was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm and early 
gained abiding appreciation of the dignity and value of honest toil and 
endeavor, the while he profited also by the privileges of the local schools 
of his native township. In his maturer years he continued his farm 
operations in Lafayette township until 1914, when he removed to his 
present attractive farm in St. Joseph township, the same being eligibly 
situated about two and one-half miles distant from Fort Wayne and 
receiving service on rural mail route No. 14 from that city. In politics 
Mr. Feichter has always been arrayed in the ranks of the Democratic 
party, though he has neither desired or held public office ; he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and he and his uif e are 
active members of the United Brethren church at Nine Mile. In 1897 
Mr. Feichter wedded Miss IMartha Milledge, daughter of Henry and 
Minnie (Smith) Milledge, who was born in Ohio and came from that 
state to Allen county many years ago. Of the ten children born to Mr. 
and I\Irs. Feichter all are living except the youngest, Richard. The names 
of the other children are here noted in respective order of birth : Effie, 
Florence, Charles, Jr., Clarence, Clifford, Pearl, Homer, Ruth and Ver- 
donna. 

John Ferguson, during his long residence in Fort AYayne, contributed 
largely and substantially to the welfare of the city, and his death April 
9, 1917, was mourned by many who came within the scope of his interests 
as represented in the financial world and the social circle. Mr. Ferguson 
was eighty-three years of age at the time of his death, twenty-nine years 
of that period having been passed as a citizen of Fort Wayne, from the 
time of his final location here in 1888. Previous to this, however, be- 
ginning in 1855, he was a resident of Fort Wayne for a considerable 
period. John Ferguson was of Scotch-Irish parentage, born June 24, 
1834, near Quebec, Canada. The father of Mr. Ferguson, who bore the 
same name is the son, was a native of Scotland, the place of his birth 
being Westfield, near Olloa, and the date, 1795. For sixteen years, be- 
ginning in 1816, the father followed the life of a sailor. About the year 
1830, he came to Canada. i\Iary Orr, who became his wife, was born in 
County Armaugh, Ireland, in 1805 ; she had come to Canada a])out one 
year previous to the arrival of Mr. Ferguson. The elder Ferguson and 
his wife settled upon a farm and there remained until the time of their 
death. Mrs. Ferguson passed away, March 19, 1879, while her husband 
remained until February 20, 1883. Mr. Ferguson was a man of great 
energy and careful habits, and his rugged constitution knew no suffering 
until just before his death, at four score and eight years. To these par- 
ents were born eleven children. The son, John, subject of this memoir, 
remained on the farm until his twentieth year, when, in 1855, he came to 
Fort Wayne. Mr. Ferguson laid the foundation for his eminently suc- 
cessful business career during the early years of his residence in Fort 
Wayne, when he established a large lumber mill in AYells county. Dur- 
ing this priod, he secured many large lumber contracts for railroad con- 
struction throughout the middle west. After an absence from Fort 
Wayne of several years, attending to business matters in other portions 
of the country, INIr. Ferguson returned to this city, in 1888, and resided 
here continuously until the time of his death. Much of the output of 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 175 

Mr. Ferguson's lumber mills was shipped to Chicago. His enterprising 
spirit led him into other investments, many of which have developed into 
leading Fort Wayne institutions which have contributed materially to 
the progress of the city. In 1909, Mr. Ferguson established the Ferguson- 
Palmer Lumber Company, of Paducah, Kentucky. Many of his outside 
interests, however, were sold during recent years (in order that he might 
give more intimate attention to important affairs in his home city. Dur- 
ing the days of natural gas, ]\Ir. Ferguson was a director of the Natural 
Gas Company, and for twelve years served as the president of the Bluffton 
Gravel Road Company. When the Citizens' Trust Company was or- 
ganized in Fort Wayne, Mr. Ferguson became the first president of that 
important financial institution. Upon the reorganization of the com- 
pany, in 1907, he assumed the duties of first vice-president and thus 
served to the time of his death. Mr. Ferguson's interests in local prop- 
erty were heavy, and he also possessed large tracts of land in Allen, 
Huntington, Wells and Marshall counties, Indiana, and Lucas county, 
Ohio. Mr. Ferguson was ever identified with the interests of the Repub- 
lican party of his county and state, and was a prominent figure in the 
local fraternal circles. He was actively identified in the Masonic order, 
being a thirty-second degree Mason, as well as a member of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was also a member of Harmony lodge. No. 19, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. For many years he was an active member of the 
First Baptist church. The marriage of Mr. Ferguson to Miss Eliza King- 
was solemnized, November 19, 1861. Mrs. Ferguson was a native of 
Canada, born in 1837. The following children, born of this union, sur- 
vive: Mrs. Earl Palmer, of Memphis, Tennessee; Mrs. Lida Vernon, of 
Fort Wayne; and John King Ferguson and Mrs. Robert S. Robertson, 
of Paducah Kentucky. Mr. Ferguson was a man of excellent character 
and his death was a distinct loss to the financial and commercial inter- 
ests of the city, as well as to the community as a whole, as his charitable 
nature endeared him to a wide circle of true friends. 

Edward L. Feustel has been a resident of Fort Wayne from the time 
of his birth and through his own ability and energy has here won advance- 
ment to a position of prominence and influence in connection with busi- 
ness affairs in general, as is evident when it is stated that he is manager 
of the Fort Wayne offices of the great national commercial agency of 
R. G. Dun & Company. As representative of this important concern 
he has shown marked executive ability and that discrimination which 
m.akes him capable of placing accurate estimates upon all lines of busi- 
ness enterprise, and he has assured position as one of the representative 
young business men of his native city, with a popularity that denotes 
the estimate placed upon him in his home community. Mr. Feustel was 
born in Fort Wayne on November 27, 1873, a son of August F. and 
Sophia D. (Kieferj Feustel, the former of whom was born in the Kingdom 
of Saxony, Germany, and the latter in Adams county, Indiana. The 
father was a gardener by vocation and was long numbered among the 
sterling and honored citizens of Fort Wayne, where his death occurred 
November 3, 1893, his wife surviving him and being still a resident of 
this city. Of their children the eldest is Henry A., of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, and the subject of this sketch was the next in order of birth; 
Adolph J. resides in the city of Detroit, Michigan; George 0. is still a 
resident of Fort Wayne; Katharine C. is the wife of R. B. Garmire, of 
this city; Frederic F. maintains his home in Detroit, Michigan; Albert 



176 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

O. is deceased ; Robert M. is a resident of Fort Wayne, and is president of 
the Fort "Wayne and Northern Indiana Traction Company; and Oscar is 
deceased. Edward L. Feustel gained his youthful education in the schools 
of Fort "Wayne and early learned the valuable lessons of personal respon- 
sibility and thrift, since, as a mere boy, he delivered daily newspapers, 
his energy in this line eventually enabling him to render service on four 
different routes. At the age of fifteen years he became a clerk in a 
grocery store, and with this line of enterprise continued his active asso- 
ciation until he had attained to years of maturity and had developed 
his powers as a young man of marked business acumen and circum- 
spection. In February, 1896, he entered the service of R. G. Dun & 
Company, and no further voucher for the efficiency and fidelity of his 
service is needed than that offered by his advancement to his present 
responsible position as manager of the local agency and business of this 
representative concern which figures as the conservator of commercial 
stability and credits throughout the United States. Mr. Feustel is essen- 
tially a business man and subordinates all else to the demands of his 
present executive position, so that he has had no desire for political 
activity further than to give loyal support to the Republican party, the 
while he manifests much interest in all that concerns the well-being of 
his native city and county. In the Masonic fraternity he has received 
the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, besides 
being affiliated also with the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Both he and his wife hold 
membership in the First Methodist Episcopal church of Fort "Wayne. On 
October 14, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Feustel to Miss 
Edna M. Parham, who was born in the state of Ohio, and their three 
children are Ruth P., Robert K. and Frederick P. 

David C. Fisher — There are many points of more than cursory inter- 
est in the ancestral and personal history of this well-known and highly 
honored citizen of Fort "Wayne, where he has maintained his home for 
more than half a century, during which he has been consecutively engaged 
in the real estate business. Of this important line of enterprise Mr. 
Fisher is now one of the veteran representatives in northern Indiana 
and through his well-ordered operations, extended over the course of 
many years, he has contributed much to the development and progress 
of Fort Wayne and Allen county. It is specially worthy of mention 
that he is the recognized dean of all who are serving as notary publics 
in Indiana, his original appointment to this office having been made 
by Governor Morton, Indiana's chief executive during the Civil War, 
and by successive reappointments Mr. Fisher has continuously served 
in this office during the long intervening years since 1865. He is a scion 
of a family that was founded in America in the colonial days and one 
or more of his ancestors gave valiant service as patriot soldiers in the 
great struggle for national independence, so that he is eligible for and 
loyally affiliated with the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. 
In the picturesque village of Little Falls, Herkimer county, New York, 
David C. Fisher was born on June 25, 1843, and he is a son of James R. 
and Henrietta (Burnet) Fisher, both likewise natives of the old Empire 
state of the Union. Mr. Fisher gained his rudimentary education in the 
common schools of his native state and was a boy of about ten years at 
the time of the family removal to the city of Chicago, Illinois, in 1853, 
His father was a skilled cabinetmaker and in Chicago became one of the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 177 

leading representatives of the undertaking business, the enterprise of 
which he thus became one of the founders having been continued vir- 
tually without interruption to the present time, and the business being 
now conducted under the title of C. H. Jordan & Company. James 
R. Fisher and his wife passed the remainder of their lives in Chicago, 
and his name merits place on the list of the early and representative 
business men of the great metropolis of the west. Of the five children 
in the family the subject of this sketch is the oldest ; Albert and William 
B. are deceased ; Robert J. resides in Fort Wayne and has been for a long 
period a traveling representative of the Bass Foundry & Machine 
Company, of this city ; and Henrietta B. is now a resident of Los Angeles, 
California. David C. Fisher attended school for a time after the family 
home had been established in Chicago and finally went to Peru, Illinois, 
where he served as messenger boy for the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany. He made good use of the opportunities afforded him in this con- 
nection and finally the company sent him to Dixon, Illinois, where he 
had charge of its office for several years. He then returned to Chicago, 
and after having there been engaged in the produce commission business 
about two years came to Fort Wayne, in 1865. Here he engaged in the 
real estate business in company with John Hough, and after the latter 's 
death assumed full control of the business, of which he continued a rep- 
resentative as one of the most venerable and honored exponents of this 
line of enterprise in this section of the Hoosier commonwealth until Jan- 
uary 1, 1917, when he retired. Mr. Fisher has been consistent in all his 
activities as a reliable and progressive business man and public-spirited 
citizen and in the county that has long represented his home he has the 
confidence and good will of all who know him. He is unwavering in 
his allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Catholic church. On May 13, 1879, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fisher to Miss Dora C. Graham, who 
was born at Peru, Miami county, Indiana, a member of a sterling and 
influential pioneer family of that county. Of the three children of Mr, 
and Mrs. Fisher the first born, Caroline, died in early childhood; John 
A. died when about three years of age ; and David Theodore still resides 
in Fort Wayne. Mrs. Dora Cecelia (Graham) Fisher is a daughter of 
John A. and Caroline (Aveline) Graham, the former of whom was born 
in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, and the latter in historic old Vin- 
cennes, Indiana. Mr. Graham came to Indiana in the pioneer days and 
was one of the early settlers of Peru, Miami county, whence he removed 
with his family to Logansport, but within a brief period he returned to 
Peru, where he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives. He 
was one of the most honored and influential citizens of Miami county, was 
long a leading member of the bar of that county and was called upon 
to serve in many important offices of public trust. He prepared and 
published an interesting and valuable history of Miami county and was 
one of the venerable citizens of Peru at the time of his death, in 1895, 
his devoted wife having preceded him to the life eternal. Of their 
nine children the following brief data are available : Mary J. is the 
widow of Sylvester Brownell and resides at Peru, this state; Catherine, 
Richard G., and James Morris are deceased; Alice E. is the widow of 
Plyny M. Crume, deceased, of Peru ; Mrs. Fisher was the next in order of 
birth ; John A. is deceased ; Rose Victoria is the wife of Frank M. Dozier, 



178 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of St. Louis, Missouri ; and Caroline A. is the widow of Charles A. Pollock, 
of Baltimore, Maryland, in which city she still maintains her home. 

Hannah Ann (Bowman) Fisher, widow of the late Samuel Fisher, 
long a prominent resident of Roanoke, and herself one of the foremost 
women of the community, was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, on 
November 12, 1835, and is the daughter of Henry and Harriett (Arm- 
strong) Bowman, who were natives of Ohio and Pennsylvania, respect- 
ively. Henry Bowman was a prosperous stockman all his active life. 
He came to Indiana in 1853, at a time when travel was difficult and only 
hard work was rewarded with any measure of prosperity. He drove his 
family and household possessions through from Ohio, the familiar ox team 
and wagon of the day being an important factor in the journey, and 
in 1852 bought a tract of two hundred acres of wild land. They experi- 
neced all the rigors of early life in the wilderness, subjected to the 
dangers from wild animals and Indians, but they fared well in spite 
of those difficulties, and became one of the prominent and well-to-do 
families of the community as the years passed. Mr. Bowman was town- 
ship trustee for a number of years, and also served some years as post- 
master at Aboite. The last ten years of his life were lived in quiet 
retirement on his home place. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs, 
Bowman. Hannah Ann, the immediate subject of this review, was the 
first born. Sarah is the wife of Thomas Crawford, of Roanoke. Eliza- 
beth is deceased, also Malinda. Harriet Jane is the fifth child. Mary 
Elizabeth was the next born. Mathias Walter, Henry, Calvin and Charles 
are all deceased. Hannah Ann Bowman was married on July 4, 1859, 
to Samuel Fisher, the son of David and Sarah Jane (Wherry) Fisher, 
who came from Pennsylvania to Ohio in early life. Samuel was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his time and worked on his father's farm 
after the manner of farmers' sons. He came to Allen county in 1852 
and found work there, later buying a farm of eighty acres. It was un- 
claimed land, without a cleared spot large enough to erect a little home 
upon. The Fisher home was the first plank house in the neighborhood, 
and was one of the finest places in the community at that time. It was 
finished throughout in black walnut, that fine old wood of which so 
much was found in Indiana at that time, and the family lived there for 
many years. Mr. Fisher was an energetic and progressive man and gained 
a considerable prominence in his town during his lifetime. He was a 
Republican and was township supervisor for seven years. He died on 
January 14, 1911, and his widow is living on the old home place, prac- 
tically alone. They were the parents of eight children. Ivester lives 
in Huntington county. Harriett Amanda is deceased, Lucinda Alice 
became the wife of Hugh McFadden and lives in Aboite township. Ida 
and Sarah Jane are deceased. Leona Dell married Cyrus Johnson and is 
a resident of Lafayette township. Mary Luetta is the wife of Talbot 
G, Foulks, and Henry D. is a resident of Fort Wayne and a conductor 
on the Pennsylvania road. There are eighteen grandchildren and eighteen 
great-grandchildren in the family at the present time. Ivester, the eldest 
child of Mrs. Fisher, has nine children, named Irma, Edna, Elva, Eva, 
Esther, Marion, Lennie, John and Florence. Lucinda also has nine chil- 
dren, named Edith, Anna, Russell, Otis, Mode, Elizabeth, Fay, Lester and 
Wilma. The great-grandchildren are as follows: Irma, eldest child of 
Ivester, now deceased, left Helen, Edna and Eve, Edna, the second 
daughter of Ivester, has Andra, Francis and Ruth. Elva is the mother 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 179 

of Harley and Maxine. Lennie has one child — "Wilhelmina. Edith is 
the mother of a son, Royal. Anna has three children — Hugh, Helen and 
Ethel. Etta has four children — Arval, Mabel, Glenn and Wyburn, and 
the first born of these is the father of one son, Arthur Aaron. Mrs. 
Fisher has thus, at the age of eighty-two, the distinction of being great- 
great-grandmother, and she is still enjoying good health and finds much 
pleasure in the contemplation of the activities of the younger gener- 
ations that have come up about her. 

Robertson J. Fisher. — In the city of Fort Wayne not to know Robert- 
son J. Fisher is virtually to argue oneself unknown, and though he has 
passed the psalmist's span of three score years and ten he exemplifies 
most splendidly in both his mental and physical powers the spirit of 
eternal youth. Buoyant, genial and optimistic, a genuine worker and 
a lover of his fellow men, he gives patent denial to the years that have 
passed and he counts as his friends both old and young, with full har- 
mony of interest in the sentiments and ideals of both classes. He has 
been assertively in and of Fort Wayne for more than a half a century 
and his memory links the city's primitive past with the twentieth century 
of opulent prosperity and progress in the capital of Allen county. Since 
1864 he has been actively identified with the Bass Foundry & Machine 
Company, under the varied changes in title and personnel, since 1864, 
and is now secretary and sales manager of this important industrial 
concern. At the time of his sixty-sixth birthday anniversary, in 1911, 
Mr. Fisher consented to give an interview to a representative of the 
Fort Wayne Sentinel, and it is firmly believed that his host of friends 
will consider most appropriate the reproduction in this history of his 
own pertinent and gracious statements concerning his career and his long 
and close association with Fort Wayne, With minor elimination and 
paraphrase, therefore, is here given the record which appeared in the 
Sentinel under date of September 23, 1911, and it is certain that a more 
interesting personal record could not be offered: "I was born at Little 
Falls, Herkimer county, New York, September 24, 1845, and am a son 
of James R. and Henrietta (Burnett) Fisher, the former of whom was 
born in New York city, in 1818, and the latter was a native of the his- 
toric old town of Elizabeth, New Jersey. My father was engaged in 
business in New York city as an importer of rosewood and mahogany, 
and he met with large financial loss through the great fire that ravaged 
the national metropolis in 1835. My parents removed to Chicago in 
1853, when I was eight years old. Chicago then had a population of 
about thirty-five thousand and old Fort Dearborn still occupied a prom- 
inent site on the Chicago river. When a small boy I and my compan- 
ions used to visit the old fortress and pick bullets out of the logs of 
which it was constructed. The water of Lake Michigan at that time 
came to the sidewalks on Michigan avenue and the Illinois Central rail- 
way tracks were constructed on piling, as was also a part of the depot, 
which was located at the foot of Lake street. The spring following our 
removal to Chicago was unusually wet and the waters very high. I 
paddled a canoe over Madison street, between Clark and State streets, 
where magnificent buildings are now located. The houses in that part 
of the city were frame and set upon stilts, and the building in which I 
attended school was a cheap brick structure located on ground opposite 
McVicker's theater. My father was engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness, with a shop and store at Madison and Clark streets, in Chicago. 
His partner was C. H. Jordan— Fisher & Jordan— and he brought the 
first iron coffin into Chicago. The firm of C. H. Jordan & Company is 



180 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

still doing business, the proprietors being the sons of my father's part- 
ner. My parents died in Chicago — my mother in 1853 and my father 
in 1857 — and in the latter year I went to Elizabeth, New Jersey, to live 
with a relative. In April, 1861, I came to Fort Wayne to live with my 
uncle, the late J. D. Nuttman, and later took a position with W. H, 
Brooks and Charles Hill, who conducted a book and stationery store. 
I worked there a year and then went into the drug store of Reed & 
Wall, at Columbia and Calhoun streets. Mr. Reed was colonel of the 
Forty-fourth Indiana Regiment of Infantry in the Civil War and was at 
the front during the greater part of my connection with the store, the 
business being conducted by Watson Wall. That corner was a pretty 
lively spot while I was there. Fights and riots were frequent and one 
of them was indelibly impressed upon my memory. In those days drug- 
store windows were protected by wooden shutters, and it was my duty 
to put them up in the evening and take them down in the morning. 
On this particular occasion a riot broke out before I had put up the 
shutters, and I performed the duty in the midst of flying bricks, stones 
and pieces of wood. I successfully dodged several bricks and managed 
to get the windows protected before they were broken, and the valuable 
stock of 'bear's oil,' used in those days to make the hair grow, was saved; 
it was made of lard-oil and alcohol. My uncle, J. D. Nuttman, and my 
brother, William B, Fisher, conducted the Citizens' Bank, where the 
Old National Bank is now located. In 1867 they organized the First 
National Bank, which was the first national bank in the state and the 
eleventh in the United States. I have one of the company's business 
cards yet, and on it are named the following directors : Samuel Hanna, 
J. F. W. Meyer, F. Nirdlinger, J. D. Nuttman, John Orff, A. S. Evans, 
A. D. Brandriff, W. B. Fisher, and John Brown. August 1, 1864, I left 
Reed & Wall and went to the Bass & Hanna foundry, now the Bass 
Foundry & Machine Company, and with the exception of a few months 
spent in Arizona and California I have been with the company since — a 
period of over forty-seven years (fifty-three years on August 1, 1917). 
That may appear a long time, but I am not old and feel as active as 
ever. I mean to live until I reach the one hundred mark. I attribute 
my activity and good health to my habits. Early to bed and early to 
rise, eat everything that agrees with me and take a little 'old crow' 
or its equivalent at dinner and lunch, some physical exercise morning 
and night, and don't worry. I served in the city council under Mayor 
H. P. Scherer and Colonel C. B. Oakley, being councilman at large during 
the latter part of my service. I resigned before the expiration of my 
term, but was there long enough to find out that I was a jackass, else 
I would not be there. In 1883 the late C. B. Woodworth and I organized 
a company for the purpose of prospecting for natural gas and oil, and 
we put down five wells. As oil and gas developers we were a failure, 
but we demonstrated the fact that there was plenty of good water under- 
lying the city. Some years ago I took an active interest in the clubs 
of Fort Wayne and devoted considerable time and money toward estab- 
lishing the Fort Wayne Club. I was its first president, was honored by 
a second term, and it was while I was filling this office that the building 
on Harrison street, now the home of the Commercial Club, was erected. 
One of the most active men in the club in early days was the Hon. Perry 
A. Randall, through whose efforts we were able to build. When I came 
to Fort Wayne there were no sidewalks on Calhoun street south of Berry 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 181 

street. Down Calhoun street was a well-worn plank road, which afforded 
a veritable shower bath after a storm — the only difference between it and 
the general kind was that the water was sent upward and was mixed 
with mud and sand. A part of Berry street also was without sidewalks, 
and there were none on any of the streets south of that thoroughfare. 
Charles Taylor, who later became one of the proprietors of the Daily 
News, and I organized the first baseball club in Fort Wayne and named 
the same the Kekionga. It became famous in baseball circles in Indiana, 
Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, New 
Jersey and Maryland. The history of the famous Kekionga ball team 
is well known in Fort Wayne. In my capacity as salesman for the Bass 
Foundry & Machine Company I have traveled more than six hundred 
and ten thousand miles in the past twenty-five years. I was never 
injured in all that time, nor was I ever on a train when it was wrecked. 
I am firmly convinced that I am destined to live a hundred years and 
that it is a part of the plan of the Ruler of the universe that I shall 
not be killed or maimed in a wreck." It is not often that a publication 
of this nature is able to offer so interesting an autobiographical record 
as the foregoing screed, and it is further significant that the resume has 
special pertinency in touching the history of Fort Wayne. Mr. Fisher 
was the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children, and the other 
two survivors are David C, who resides in Fort Wayne, and Henrietta, 
who now lives in the city of Los Angeles, California. Mr. Fisher is a 
Democrat in polities, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, holds mem- 
bership in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club and the Country Club, 
attends the Presbyterian church, as did also his wife. On October 30, 
1866, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fisher to Miss Julia Mosby 
Holton, who was born at Covington, Kentucky, August 11, 1849, and 
who died at Los Angeles, California, September 18, 1914, her remains 
being laid to rest in the beautiful Mountain View cemetery at Pasadena, 
that state. Mrs. Fisher was a woman of most gentle and gracious per- 
sonality and was loved by all who came within the compass of her 
influence. She was eligible for membership in both the Society of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution and the Colonial Dames. She 
is survived by only one child, Maude F., who is the widow of Lucien 
E. Walker and who maintains her home at Los Angeles, her only child, 
Paul E. Walker, being married and having a daughter, so that Mr. 
Fisher, of this review, has the distinction of being a great-grandfather. 
He is a scion of families that were founded in America in the colonial 
era of our national history and is affiliated with the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, one, his great-grandfather. Colonel David 
Chambers, of Trenton, New Jersey, having been a gallant officer of the 
Continental Line in the great struggle that brought independence to 
the nation. 

Philip Fissel was a resident of Fort Wayne for more than two-score 
years and made his influence felt as a man of sterling character and as a 
citizen of utmost loyalty and public spirit. He came from Germany to 
America as a youth and stood as a representative of the best type of 
the valued German element of citizenship in Allen county, where he 
gained and retained secure place in popular confidence and good will. 
He was a man of industrious habits and was for many years actively 
employed at his trade, that of furniture finisher, as a skilled artisan 
along which line he was employed by leading Fort Wayne furniture 



182 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

houses that invariably placed high estimate upon his service and his 
uprightness in all of the relations of life. Mr. Fissel was born in Olden- 
heira, Rhinhessen, Germany, on June 24, 1847, and his death occurred 
at his home in Fort Wayne on June 21, 1914, three days prior to the 
sixty-seventh anniversary of his birth. His parents, George and Kath- 
erine (Muehl) Fissel passed their entire lives in the German fatherland, 
and the father was a weaver by trade, some of the products of his skill 
being owned and highly prized by the family of the subject of this 
memoir. Philip Fissel was the fourth in a family of nine children; Mrs. 
Eva Koch still resides in Germany ; Katherine is the wife of John Kemna, 
of Cincinnati, Ohio; John and George are deceased; Adam resides in 
Cincinnati ; Peter is deceased ; Gertrude is the wife of George Fresse, 
of Cincinnati ; and Rosina remains in Germany. Philip Fissel acquired his 
early education in the excellent schools of his native land, where also 
he learned the trade of shoemaker. At the age of eighteen years he 
severed the home ties and came to the United States. He established his 
residence in the city of Cincinnati, and there learned the trade of fur- 
niture finishing, in which he became an expert workman and to which 
he devoted his attention up to twelve years prior to his death, in later 
years having lived retired. He established his home in Fort Wayne in 
1872, and he identified himself fully and loyally with the community life, 
both civic and business, so that he was known and honored of men and 
made for himself a record that shall reflect lasting honor upon his name 
and memory. He was a staunch and well-fortified supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party and his religious faith was that of the 
Reformed church, of which his widow was a devoted adherent. On 
October 28, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fissel to Miss 
Anna M. Kuechler, who was born in Germany and who was a daughter 
of the late Philip Semon Kuechler and Anna Barbara (Kratz) Kuechler. 
Mrs. Fissel died in Cincinnati, October 17, 1916. In the passing years 
she had drawn to herself a wide circle of friends, and was sustained and 
comforted by the filial devotion of her children. Concerning the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Fissel brief record is entered in conclusion of this tribute 
to the honored parents : George John resides in Fort Wayne ; Philip 
died in infancy; Charles Frederick maintains his home in Fort Wayne 
and is a conductor in the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company ; 
Gertrude is a popular teacher in the Franklin school of Fort Wayne ; 
Peter is a painter and decorator by vocation and is engaged in business 
in Fort Wayne ; Rose Ann is the wife of Elmer J. Yoirol, of Fort Wayne, 
her husband being in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

Charles B. Fitch. — To the city of Fort Wayne Charles Byron Fitch 
is contributing a life of devotion to its constant betterment. No one 
more clearly than he sees beyond the present and grasps a vision of the 
Fort Wayne of the future — a Fort Wayne of opportunities for develop- 
ment along every commendable line of human endeavor. On many 
public occasions, specially since the year 1910, his voice has been raised 
in pleading for concerted, advanced thought to enable the city of Fort 
Wayne to come into the full realization and enjoj'ment of her high place 
among the cities of the middle west. Of late his special endeavor has 
been to direct the attention of the public to the need of modern housing 
conditions for the thousands of new citizens who are drawn to the city 
through the demands of its enlarging commercial and manufacturing 
institutions. Mr. Fitch is engaged in the general insurance business in 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 183 

Fort "Wayne and in this line has risen to a place of leadership. He was 
born in Medina county, Ohio, May 23, 1859, the son of William W. and 
Aurelia (Brintnall) Fitch. His father was born in Charlemont, Massa- 
chusetts, and was twelve years of age when he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Ohio, where he was reared to maturity and where 
he became a successful farmer, his connection with this basic line of 
industry continuing until his death, in 1867. In Ohio was solemnized 
his marriage to Miss Aurelia Brintnall, who was born in Seneca county, 
New York, and of their seven children all are living, in 1917, except one 
son who died while serving as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. 
The first of the Fitch family to reach America from England — the Rev. 
James Fitch — settled in Rhode Island in 1637, and became one of the 
founders of that colony. It is related that at one time he sold fifteen 
thousand acres of land in Massachusetts for one hundred and twenty-five 
pounds. Nine generations of Fitches since the Rev. James Fitch are 
easily traceable. There is a clear record of the English ancestry back 
to the year 1567. Charles B. Fitch, after attending the public schools in 
Ohio, came in 1873 to Fort Wayne, where he continued his studies. At 
the age of seventeen years he was engaged in teaching school to gain 
the means for continuing his studies in the high school. Following his 
schooling he spent three years in the mercantile and grain business at 
Avilla, Noble county, Indiana. In 1882, when the Fort Wayne Jenney 
Electric Light Company — forerunner of the present Fort Wayne plant 
of the General Electric Company — was organized, he accepted with the 
institution a position as assistant manager. He remained with the com- 
pany until 1891, when he entered the life insurance field, as the general 
agent for northeastern Indiana of the National Life Insurance Company 
of Montpelier, Vermont. He has continued, with the wide growth of his 
busin'^ss, to handle the insurance of this company, while at the same time 
handling other lines of insurance — including fire, liability and all classes 
of insurance, all of them having been developed to large proportions. 
To-day his agency represents some of the strongest and best companies 
in the world. Mr. Fitch is a recognized authority on insurance matters. 
For two years he served as actuary of the insurance department of 
Indiana, under the regime of State Auditor William H. Hart. Mr. Fitch 
is a member of Plymouth Congregational church. He is a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite Mason, a Knight Templar, of which order he is past 
commander, a Shriner, and a member of the Lodge of Elks. His 
membership in the Commercial Club and the Quest Club, of which bodies 
he has served as president, afford wide opportunity for efforts along 
commercial and civic lines, and these have no more active and earnest 
exponents than Mr. Fitch. In polities he is a Republican. The wife of 
Mr. Fitch was formerly Miss Elizabeth Fryer, a daughter of the late 
Henry Fryer, of Avilla, Noble county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Fitch 
have one daughter, Geraldine, who is ten years of age, in 1917. 

Harvey Fitch is another of the native sons of Allen county who has 
given good account of himself as one of the world's productive workers 
and is now living virtually retired in the attractive village of Hunter- 
town, Perry township. He is a stockholder in the Farmers' Mutual 
Telephone Company and is president of the Huntertown Cemetery As- 
sociation. The lineage of the Fitch family traces back to sterling 
English origin and the original American representatives of the family 
came to this country in the colonial period of our national history. Harvey 



184 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Fitch was born on a pioneer farm in Perry township, this county, July 
15, 1853, a son of Nathaniel and Sarah Elizabeth (Belong) Fitch, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, their marriage 
having been solemnized in Allen county, Indiana. Nathaniel Fitch, Jr., 
father of the subject of this review, bore the full name of his father, who 
was a successful agriculturist in Pennsylvania. Reared and educated in 
the old Keystone State, Nathaniel, Jr., was a young man when he came 
from Pennsylvania to Allen county, in 1832, and obtained a homestead 
claim of government land in Perry township, two and one-half miles 
east of the present village of Huntertown. He was a blacksmith by 
trade and it is worthy of historic note that he forged the lock irons used 
on the old canal extending from Fort Wayne to the Wabash river. He 
reclaimed his farm from the virtual wilderness and became one of the 
honored and influential citizens of Perry township. His marriage to 
Miss Sarah Elizabeth Belong was solemnized on June 14, 1840, and 
they forthwith established their home on the pioneer farm in Perry town- 
ship, where Mr. Fitch also established a blacksmith shop in which he 
continuel to do a large amount of work at his trade, being one of the 
pioneer exponents of this sturdy vocation within the borders of Allen 
county. His shop is still standing and is one of the pioneer landmarks of 
this part of the county. Mr. Fitch developed one of the excellent farms 
of the county, was active in community affairs and served for a number 
of years as township trustee. He was about seventy years of age at 
the time of his death and his widow, one of the gracious and revered 
pioneer women of the county, attained to the venerable age of ninety 
years. Mr. Fitch left the parental home when he was a lad of but fifteen 
years, and he bore with him in a bandana handkerchief all of his f orldly 
possessions, except the rifle which he considered an essential part of his 
equipment. He made the journey from Pennsylvania to Allen county on 
foot and eventually became one of the largest landholders in this county, 
his estate at one time having comprised about thirty-two thousand acres, 
besides which he became the owner of lands in Iowa. He was one of the 
most vigorous and ambitious of the pioneers of Allen county and in ad- 
dition to his farm industry and his work as a blacksmith owned and 
operated a saw mill near the Bekalb county line and developed also a 
substantial wool-carding business. He was specially well known for his 
great pedestrian powers, and he almost invariably made trips to and from 
his farm and Fort Wayne on foot. The ruins of his pioneer saw mill, 
which was operated by water power, are still to be seen, and in all, he 
was a sterling and progressive citizen who contributed much to the furth- 
erance of civic and material development and advancement in Allen 
county. He and his noble wife, who shared with him in the vicissitudes 
of pioneer life and in the prosperity of later years, her death having oc- 
curred, September 6, 1908, became the parents of fourteen children, and 
thus gave their full quota of hostages to fortune. The eldest son. Perry, 
wedded Miss Sarah Elizabeth Gloyd, May 12, 1861, and continued his 
residence in Allen county until his death, April 18, 1900; Matthias, the 
second son, married Miss Francis Vandalia, Becember 1, 1867 ; Charles 
married Miss Louisa N. Clubb, April 12, 1868; Mary Jane became the 
wife of Levi Beers, Becember 24, 1873 ; Frances wedded Christian Fair, 
November 26, 1874 ; Fitilda became the wife of Jerome Gloyd, October 6, 
1875; Amos wedded Miss Nancy Elizabeth Hunter, November 27, 1878; 
Harvey, of this review, was the next in order of birth ; Sarah Elizabeth 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 185 

became, December 18, 1881, the wife of Irwin Stratton ; Emeline became 
the wife of Allen Monroe Hartsell, December 28, 1881 ; David Nathaniel 
wedded Miss Emma Belle Sterling, June 1, 1878; Idealice became the wife 
of Melvin Arthur Mason, October 8, 1891 ; Allen married Emeline Green, 
May 25, 1893 ; and Nancy died September 1, 1848, as a child. The honored 
father, Nathaniel Fitch, died June 1, 1877. Harvey Fitch, to whom this 
review is dedicated, acquired his early education in the district schools 
and in Perry Center Seminary, an excellent educational institution of 
the pioneer days in Allen county history. He continued his studies at 
intervals until he was about eighteen years of age, and in the meanwhile 
had gained close and effective fellowship with the sturdy work of the 
farm. He continued as an exponent of agricultural industry in Perry 
township and after his marriage, at the age of twenty-eight years, he 
established his residence on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, hard 
by the old homestead of his father. Later he purchased a portion of his 
father's old homestead and there coiitinued his activities as a progressive 
agriculturist and stockgrower for a period of about fourteen years, with- 
in which he had made his farm one of the model rural demesnes of his 
native township. About 1906 Mr. Fitch removed with his family to his 
present attractive home at Huntertown, where he has since lived practic- 
ally retired, though he still gives close supervision to his various real 
estate and capitalistic interests. His political allegiance is given unre- 
servedly to the Democratic party and he is well fortified in his opinions 
concerning governmental and economic affairs. He is a charter member 
of the lodge of Free and Accepted Masons at Huntertown, and both he 
and his wife are zealous members of the Universalist church. Their home 
is known for its gracious hospitality and in the same cordial welcome is 
always assured to their wide circle of friends. On August 30, 1879, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fitch to Miss Etta Permelia Parker, who 
was born and reared in this county, a daughter of the late Dunbar and 
Permelia Parker, of Huntertowm. Mr. and Mrs. Fitch have five chil- 
dren ; Audrey, who completed a course in the Angola College and is now 
with the wife of George Hursh, of Perry township ; Nina completed her 
education in Valparaiso University and is now the wife of Henry A. 
Emerick, of Fort Wayne ; Parker Eugene, who has charge of the old 
homestead farm of his father and whose final educational discipline was 
gained in Angola College, wedded Miss Alma Urbine ; Cecil completed the 
curriculum of the Huntertown public schools and is now the wife of 
Varnie E. McComb, of Huntertown ; and Ernest is a member of the class 
of 1917 in the Fort Wayne Business College. 

Monroe W. Fitch & Sons are known among the spirited and suc- 
cessful representatives of the insurance and real estate business in Fort 
Wayne, Monroe W. Fitch being associated with his two sons— Delmer C. 
and Eugene M. — under the firm title of Monroe W. Fitch & Sons, with 
offices at the corner of Berry and Clinton streets. The father was born in 
Medina county, Ohio, and in his youth rounded out an effective educa- 
tion by attending Oberlin College. For more than twenty years he 
owned and operated a fine stock farm in Medina county, and from the 
same made extensive shipments of high-grade horses to the Eastern 
market. In 1892 he came to Fort Wajaie and engaged in the livery busi- 
ness, but after one year abandoned this enterprise to become associated 
with his brother, Charles B. Fitch, in the fire insurance business. In 
1898 the partnership was dissolved and Mr, Fitch then becam^e associated 



186 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

with his two sons, Delmer C, and Eugene M. Fitch, in forming the pres- 
ent representative insurance firm of Monroe W. Fitch & Sons, The office 
headquarters of the firm were maintained at 86 Calhoun street until June, 
1903, when the purchase of the Hartnett Insurance Agency was effected 
and removal Avas made to the well appointed office of the latter, at the 
corner of Berry and Clinton streets, where is now controlled by the firm 
a large and substantial general insurance and real estate business. Delmer 
C. Fitch was likewise born at Medina, Ohio, and is a son of Monroe W. 
and Emma Y. Fitch. In the public schools of his native county he con- 
tinued his studies until he had availed himself fully of the advantages of 
the Medina high school, after Avhich he came to Fort AVayne and took a 
clerical position in the shoe store of his uncle. Two years later he 
advanced from this post to that of clerk in the offices of the Farmers' 
Loan Association, but within a short interval was prompted to take an 
assistant superentendency in the local office of the celebrated Prudential 
Insurance Company. Energy and ability were shown in later association 
with other leading insurance agencies in Fort Wayne, and finally, in 1898, 
he became associated wdth his father and brother, as previously indicated. 
The Fitch & Sons agency is well managed and well balanced. They do 
a large fire insurance business, are general agents for Northeastern In- 
diana for the Maryland Casualty Company, of Baltimore, Md., handling 
all the business for that company in Northeastern Indiana. They also 
do a large and profitable life insurance business for the John Hancock 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, of Boston, as well as quite an extensive 
loan business, this department being managed by Delmer C. Fitch. The 
Real Estate Department is headed by Monroe W. and Eugene M. Fitch, 
they having several able assistants. They do a large city and suburban 
business. One of the additions being put on at the time this goes to 
press is the beautiful subdivision and high class, exclusive residence dis- 
trict known as Crestholme Circle, w^hich is already known to be a great 
success. They have always made a specialty of handling farms over a 
wide territory in Northeastern Indiana and Northwestern Ohio, having to 
their credit many of the largest sales ever closed in this section in the 
land business. Delmer C. Fitch is identified with the Fort Wayne Real 
Estate Exchange, the Northern Indiana Underwriters Association, and 
the Indiana Federation of Fire Insurance Agents. In the Masonic fra- 
ternity he is affiliated with the Scottish Rite body, as well as wdth the 
Mystic Shrine, and he is identified with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Fort Wayne Commercial Club 
and the Fort Wayne Country Club. 

William Fogwell. — One of the fine farms of Allen county is that 
owned by William Fogwell, now retired from active farming operations. 
He was long ranked among the most prosperous and progressive farming 
men of the county and the rest he now enjoys is one that was well earned 
in a long period of sturdy adherence to his chosen work. Mr. Fogwell 
son of Samuel and Mathilda (Davis) Fogwell. The parents were born in 
son of Samuel and Mathilda (David) Fogw^ell. The parents were born in 
Maryland, in the vicinity of Hagerstown. In 1839 Samuel Fogwell came 
to Indiana, settling in Allen county, in 1839, and making Lafayette town- 
ship his home. He bought a farm and operated it, giving some attention 
to his trade as a cooper. He prospered and died on the home place, 
esteemed by all w^ho knew him. His widow survived for a time and died 
at the old home place. Mr. Fogw^ell was a Whig in his early days and 



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FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 187 

later became a Republican, and he was one of the leaders of his com- 
munity as long as he lived. He was progressive, energetic and capable 
and served his township for years as trustee. He was a member of the 
Universalist church. Eleven children were born to him and his wife. 
They were named Mary, William, Anna, Eliza, Jacob, Rebecca, Catherine, 
the widow of Henry Lopshire, Samuel, David, Martha, Alice and Alfred. 
Mary, Jacob, Rebecca, Samuel, David, Martha and the two youngest are 
deceased. AVilliam Fogwell attended the public schools of Allen county 
as a boy and divided his time between his studies and his father's farm 
up to the age of twenty-one years. He then rented a farm and started 
out on his own responsibility. His success from the beginning was 
unusual and he was soon able to buy his first piece of land, a tract of 
seventy-four acres which has continued to be his home from that time to 
the present. His next purchase was a forty acre tract adjoining, and 
he has added one tract after another to his holdings until he today is 
the owner of between four and five hundred acres of the finest land in 
the county. He specilalized largely in stock and dairy farming in the ac- 
tive years of his life, and his fine cattle and hogs were his pride. Mr. 
Fogwell has retired from active work and the farm is now being con- 
ducted by his son. He is a veteran of the Civil war, having spent three 
years in the service. He enlisted in August, 1862, in Company C, 74th 
Indiana Infantry, and continued through to the cessation of hostilities. 
His command participated in many of the severest engagements of the 
war, among them being Chiekamaugua, Missionary Ridge, Lookout Moun- 
tain and the Siege of Atlanta. He was wounded in action on July 9, 
1864, and on February following re-entered the ranks and continued 
until the surrender a few months later. He is a Republican, and served 
his township as supervisor. He was married on September 29, 1856, to 
Mary, daughter of John Nicodemus of Allen county, and she died leaving 
eight children. February, 1877, Mr. Fogwell married Miss Julia A. 
Smith, daughter of Henry Smith, of Huntington county, Indiana, and one 
son, Richard, has been born to them. He is engaged in carrying on the 
farm since his father retired. Mr. Fogwell is grandfather to twelve 
children and a great-grandfather to five. Mrs. Fogwell was born on 
April 13, 1848. 

David N. Foster. — While, for the past forty years, Colonel David N. 
Foster has been intimately identified with nearly every activity designed 
for the good of the people of Fort Wayne, he will be best remembered by 
coming generations as the "father" of the present city park system. 
It is of sneh a man that this sketch treats — a type of citizen which has 
enabled Fort Wayne to take and to maintain a leading position among 
the municipalities of the middle west. Colonel Foster was born in 
Coldenh.am, Orange County, New York, April 24, 1841. At the early 
age of fourteen, he left his father's farm and commenced his career as a 
business man in the capacity of "bundle boy" in the store of W. E. 
Lawrence, an old-time New York City dry goods merchant. In 1859, at 
the age of eighteen, in company with his brother, Scott Foster, he formed 
the retail dry goods firm of Foster Brothers, of New York City, which 
firm, in 1868, turned its attention to the west and opened its first branch 
establishments. In 1861, Colonel Foster enlisted as a private in the Ninth 
New York State Militia. With this regiment he saw three years of 
severe service in the Union array, resigning, at length, because of dis- 
ability arising from wounds. He was the first volunteer from Orange 



188 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

county, New York, in the Civil war. He came home from the service 
captain of the company in which he enlisted as a private, having, mean- 
while, gone through the lesser grades of corporal, sergeant and lieutenant. 
In 1871, Colonel Foster came to Indiana and opened the store of Foster 
Brothers at Terre Haute, which is still in existence. In 1873 he was 
attracted into the field of newspaperdom and withdrew from the Terre 
Haute firm. At Grand Rapids, Mich., he established the Saturday Even- 
ing Post, a literary and news paper, an enterprise which met with 
marked success. In 1877, Colonel Foster's attention was directed to the 
wide-awake city of Fort Wayne, and he sold his newspaper at such a 
satisfactory figure that he was enabled to re-enter the old firm of Foster 
Brothers, which had established the Fort Wayne branch in 1868 on a 
scale that had made the business at once a leader in the city. One of the 
earliest acts of Colonel Foster which exhibits his public-spiritedness was 
the effort to secure the passage by the Indiana legislature of 1882 of the 
Public Library act by which libraries would come under the direct con- 
trol of the boards of public school trustees, and which should be estab- 
lished through the levying of a special tax by the city council. The 
present public library and its excellent management are the outgro"w^h 
of this pioneer effort. In 1885, Colonel Foster was chosen Department 
Commander of the Indiana Grand Army of the Republic, in which organi- 
zation he has been deeply interested and in which his activities have 
resulted in the accomplishment of splendid benefits to his former brothers 
in arms. He is a member of the Loyal Legion of the Commandery of 
Indiana, and in 1895 was its junior vice commander. He was largely 
instrumental in the establishment of the Indiana State Soldiers' Home 
at Lafayette, his service as a member of the commission which selected 
the site and purchased the grounds proving of high value to those of his 
companions who sought only the highest good of the remaining members 
of the country's defenders. He helped to prepare the bill which estab- 
lished the home and succeeded in securing its passage by the legislature. 
Governor Claude Matthews appointed him to serve as a member of the 
first board of trustees of the institution. He served a second term under 
the appointment of Governor James A. Mount. In 1891, with a clear 
vision of Fort Wayne's future growth, Colonel Foster organized the 
Fort Wayne Land and Improvement Company, which assumed the big 
task of creating the present beautiful section of the city known as Lake- 
side. With a firm belief that saloons should not be permitted in residence 
districts, he advised that the sale of liquors be forever prohibited in 
that addition, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, and the company 
so decided. The same clause was subsequently placed in the provisions 
of other contiguous and neighboring additions, until an area of five hun- 
dred acres in that part of the city never knew the presence of a saloon. 
In the same year that the Fort Wayne Land and Improvement Company 
came into existence, Colonel Foster assisted in the organization of the 
Tri-State Loan and Trust Company as the subscriber for the first twenty- 
five shares of the company's stock. He was one of the original stock- 
holders which, under the leadership of Theodore F. Thieme, organized 
the great corporation known as the Wayne Knitting Mills. He Avas one 
of the organizers of the German-American National bank and the German- 
American Trust Company. He was one of the original stockholders of 
the Huntington Trust Company, and, in 1907, he organized the People's 
Trust Company, at Muncie, Indiana, which bought out the People's Na- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY " 189 

tional bank of that city and succeeded to its business. He assisted in the 
organization of the Indiana Road Machine Company and the Fort Wayne 
Furniture Company. The latter concern, like a great many furniture 
manufactories, met failure in the financial panic of 1893. Colonel Foster 
was left with something like $50,000 of endorsed paper to pay. It has 
always been a matter of pride to him that the entire obligation was paid, 
one hundred cents on the dollar, principal and interest, "and without 
the loss of a single night's rest." Colonel Foster was an active spirit in 
the organization of the Fort Wayne Hotel Company which built the 
Anthony hotel, one of the leading places of entertainment in the middle 
west. He was one of the organizers of the Commercial Improvement Com- 
pany, which purchased the Rockhill farm and made possible the large 
industrial district immediately west of the city, known as Westfield. The 
object of this company was not to create financial gain but to add greatly 
to the city's manufacturing interests. At the time of the destruction 
of the old covered bridge over the Maumee river at East Main street, 
Colonel Foster led a two years' "fight" which finally resulted in its 
re-location at Columbia street, thus giving that oldest of business streets 
a direct approach over the river from the east and north where before 
it had always had a dead end at Lafayette street. Colonel Foster was 
one of the leaders in the erection of the splendid home of the Young 
Women's Christian Association on West Wayne street. He served as a 
member of the building committee. He is a member of the First Presby- 
terian church, and was a member of the building committee which erected 
the present church building. For several years he served as a member 
of the board of trustees of the church society. For nearly all his life. 
Colonel Foster has been a Republican, but he uniformly refused political 
office. In 1912, believing that the management of the Republican party 
had fallen into the hands of scheming politicians, he joined the move- 
ment for the organization of the Progressive party, and was chosen a 
delegate to the Chicago convention which nominated Theodore Roosevelt 
for the presidency. For some years he was the president of Hope Hos- 
pital association, and has always been active in behalf of this valuable 
institution. In fact, there has scarcely been any public activity in any 
direction in Fort Wayne for nearly forty years in which Colonel Foster 
has not borne an active part. But, as has been suggested before, he be- 
lieves his most valuable service and that which will longest endure has 
been performed through his long connection with the Board of Park Com- 
missioners of Fort Wayne. As its president he has given to the duties 
of the office for many years nearly one-half of his time without other 
compensation than that which comes from the performance of public 
service. He will always be remembered as the "father" of the present 
splendid park system of Fort Wayne. In 1909, in connection with his 
brother, Samuel M. Foster, he donated to the city Foster Park, the largest, 
and in some respects the most useful and most beautiful of all the parks 
of Fort Wayne. He has said that the only praise to which he and his 
brother are entitled in this connection is the credit of having sho"v\nQ 
discriminating sense in the selection of a monument which would endure 
and grow more beautiful and more serviceable as the years go by. Colonel 
Foster is inclined to think that he was the first of Fort Wayne business 
men to incorporate a retail business. The D. N. Foster Furniture Com- 
pany was incorporated in 1884, the business which had heretofore been 
a partnership having been established in Fort Wayne in 1868. This busi- 



190 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES . 

ness he has so efficiently organized that he has often said that he could 
drop out of its management at any time and it would continue just as 
successfully without his aid. On January 10, 1878, Colonel Foster was 
united in marriage with Miss Sara J. Pyne, of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
daughter of John and Sara Pyne, of Hamilton, N. Y., and to this union 
were born the following children : Pearl Foster Rahe, wife of Frank J. 
Rahe, of Los Angeles, California, and Florence Foster Hall, wife of 
Harvey Hall, of Charleston, West Virginia. 

Samuel M. Foster. — The telling of the story of the life and interests 
of Samuel M. Foster imposes upon the biographer a task of consider- 
able magnitude. Now in his sixty-sixth year (1917), with ample means 
to "take life easy," Mr. Foster stands today as a leader in those activ- 
ities which are of the most valuable service to his fellow-men. An 
estimate of the position of Mr. Foster in the manufacturing, financial 
and social life of Fort Wayne and Indiana can best be gained through 
a consideration of the means of the development of his fortunes down 
through the years. Such a review will make clear the steps which 
have led to the enviable place he has so long occupied in this community 
— steps which have often presented such a rugged and forbidding aspect 
as would daunt a man of less stable character. Mr. Foster was born 
in Coldenham, Orange county. New York, December 12, 1851, the son 
of John L. and Harriet (Scott) Foster. He was the youngest of seven 
children, six of whom were boys. At the age of fourteen he went to 
New York and entered upon employment in a dry goods store conducted 
by his brothers, but, three years afterward, he located at Troy, New 
York, where, at the age of twenty-one, he formed a partnership with his 
brother, the late A. Z. Foster, in the retail dry goods business. The 
brother was, in his latter years, a successful merchant at Terre Haute, 
Indiana. The Troy venture proved to be profitable, and, two years later, 
Samuel M. Foster found himself financially able to carry out a plan 
to secure a collegiate education. He sold his interests in the Troy estab- 
lishment and entered Yale, at New Haven, Connecticut. The fact that 
during the conduct of his regular work, Mr. Foster was able to find 
the time to serve as one of the editors of the Yale Courant suggests the 
energetic application of the student during that period. Incidentally, 
he won an appointment on the junior exhibition, earned the high honor 
of a selection as one of the Townsend men from a competitive class of 
one hundred and thirty-two, and was named by the faculty as one of 
ten to represent the class on the platform on the occasion of commence- 
ment day. On June 26, 1879, Mr. Foster received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and graduated fourteenth in a class composed originally of two 
hundred members. Mr. Foster came to Fort Wayne in the fall of 1879, 
and entered the law office of Judge Robert S. Taylor. He had not 
determined the nature of his life work, but was aware of the value 
of an education along the line which the reading of the law would 
provide. At this same time, he was concerned with regard to the con- 
dition of his health, which had become impaired during the closing 
strenuous days of his work at Yale, and he determined to abandon for 
the time, at least, the more or less confining work of the law office and 
to enter upon a career in journalism. The way was opened at Dayton, 
Ohio, where the Saturday Evening Record was established, with Mr. 
Foster as its editor and proprietor. The experience was brief, and it 
appears to have convinced Mr. Foster that a continuance in this line 




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\ 






FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 191 

at that time would have been ruinous to both health and purse. In 
1880, the Record — now the Dayton Daily Herald — was sold, and Mr. 
Foster returned to Fort Wayne and resumed his connection with Foster 
Brothers, who had launched upon the commercial sea in the middle west. 
In 1882, the firm was dissolved by the withdrawal of Scott Foster, who 
went to New York to assume the duties as president of a bank, and 
the business of the firm was then divided, Samuel M. Foster succeeding 
to the charge of the firm's dry goods department. It was while encoun- v 
tering reverses in the business world that Mr. Foster, with rare good 
fortune, became "the father of the shirt waist" which laid the foundation 
of his fortune and provided the women of the world with the most useful 
and the most universally-worn garment ever devised. Referring to this 
most interesting period, Mr. Foster, in an interview published in 1904, 
said: "It's the same old story. Necessity was the mother of invention. 
I was in the retail dry goods business over on Calhoun street, between 
Main and Berry. I had precious little capital, and most of it was bor- 
rowed. Rent was high and trade was dull. It was a perfect case of 
'expenses like New York and business like New Haven.' 'A general 
flavor of mild decay' pervaded the establishment, and there was great 
danger that the business would dry up and blow away. For months 
I was on the ragged edge, and couldn't see anything in the future but 
failure in business and the humiliation of not being able to pay my 
debts. Clerks stood around and waited for customers who wouldn't 
come. My own time was taken up largely in trying to devise some plan 
to stem the current that was slowly, but I could see was surely, carrying 
me into water beyond my depth. One day in the winter of 1884-5, when 
the thermometer was too low to read, and a customer was as scarce as 
natural gas, I just happened to recall that during the preceding summer 
I had bought soinc boys' unlaundered shirt waists that were good sellers 
and hard to get. I fell to wondering whether we could not make some 
for the next season, using the materials from the store and having the 
clerks cut them out. There wasn't one left in stock, but inquiry among 
the clerks revealed the fact that one of them had one at home in the 
wardrobe of his little boy. When he brought it to the store the next 
day it was a sorry-looking object, worn out and faded by many washings. 
But I wish I had it today. I would be tempted to have it handsomely 
framed and installed among those who have been my best friends. How 
little it takes to change the current of men's lives! How small a thing 
will sometimes turn failure aside and bring success in its stead, or vice 
versa! It fairly makes one shudder to think how much often depends 
upon the way we decide the merest trifle. Perhaps the same small measure 
of success would have followed along some other chain of events, but 
we can 'never measure the might have been.' Be that as it may, the 
little rag of a shirt waist was the start of what little material success 
I may have met with. What did I do with it? Well, I took it and 
with my own hands ripped it apart, and from the different parts made 
something resembling patterns. Then I cut one out and one of the 
clerks sewed it together. When it was done it was like the boy who 
was to wear it, "fearfully and wonderfully made.' Then we guessed 
how much bigger the larger sizes should be and how much smaller the 
smaller ones. Then we skirmished about to find 'kids' of the average 
sizes for the various ages from four to fourteen years. After pegging 
along in this way for a while we eventually secured patterns for a line 



192 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of sizes. I think I did all the work myself. Then we started to make 
up a little stock. "We didn't even know how to go about cutting them 
out. We used pocket knives and scissors, and cut about three thick- 
nesses of cloth at a time. Now often we cut sixty at one time and do it 
easier than when we used to cut three. Everything was petty and 
crude, but we didn't know any better. About this time I remember one 
day my brother, D. N. Foster, and George W. Pixley came in, and, finding 
me haggling away with a jack-knife, remarked with mingled pity and 
disgust, 'Well, that's great work for a Yale graduate to be at.' How- 
ever, necessity, like the lawyers, 'knows no law,' and I had to keep 
at it. After getting a lot cut, we gave them out to women to make. 
Our idea up to this time was merely to make enough for our own use, 
but one day it occurred to me that I might sell some to other merchants. 
So I mailed a sample to about half a dozen dry goods firms that I knew of, 
together with a personal letter. I remember very well the result. We 
received three orders for twenty-five dozen each. The receipt of these 
three orders quite elated me. I figured they cost me $1.50 per dozen, not 
counting the time of the clerks, and we sold them for $2 a dozen. 
Other small orders came in, and I quickly set about increasing our facil- 
ities. I found out how to cut them and hired a cutter. He is with us yet. 
We made just one thing, a boys' calico shirt waist at $2 a dozen. The 
first season we sold three thousand dozen, clearing $1,500, but what 
was made in the shirt waist business was being promptly lost in the 
dry goods business, and then some. The second year we sold six thousand 
dozen, the profits from which promptly again went down the same rat- 
hole. About this time I made up my mind to get out of the dry goods 
business in any way possible short of setting fire to the store. It took 
a year to accomplish this, but at last it was achieved, and I came out 
with a whole skin and good credit, but not much except faith and hope. 
This was in December, 1886. Since then it has been smooth sailing, but 
I have often thought that I worked harder and more intelligently when 
I was going down hill than I have ever since. So you see, as I said 
before, it was the old story of necessity being the mother of invention. 
Had I been making a living in the dry goods business I would have 
been there yet, but because I wasn't I had to devise something else. 
So, a fellow doesn't ever know what is best for him, or, as the believer 
in special providence puts it: 'Behind a frowning countenance God 
often hides a smiling face!' Well, who invented the ladies' shirt waist? 
Nobody. Like Topsy, it 'just grew.' I have told you we started making 
boys' shirt waists in December, 1886. By the summer of 1889 we had 
so developed the business that we were making quite a line of styles 
in the various sizes, the largest being fourteen years. Along in the 
spring of that year we found ourselves receiving many reorders for the 
largest sizes only. As the price was based on the average size, and as 
a fourteen cost about double what a four did, orders for nothing but 
big sizes left us holding the bag at a great rate. Some requests came 
for sixteens. We knew boys of that size and age didn't wear shirt 
waists, so we set on foot an inquiry to ascertain what had created the 
demand. We discovered that the boys' sisters were buying these large 
sizes and wearing them to play croquet and lawn tennis, or to go picnick- 
ing in. Soon they began asking for longer sleeves and smaller necks. 
We took the hint and made something especially adapted for the girls. 
The next year we made quite a line that met with ready sale, but it was 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 193 

a year or two before we broke loose, and every woman took to wearing 
them. As we know it, the shirt waist is an American garment. It 
originated here and has always been much more generally worn in this 
country than in Europe. Later, the separate silk waist came into vogue, 
and, since its advent, it has had a considerable influence on the wash 
waists. I do not claim that we made the first shirt waists that were 
ever made in this country, but I know of no one who made them before 
we did. Probably some other manufacturers had an experience similar 
to ours at about the same time, and responded to the demand about as 
we did. Certainly, we were the first parties west of New York to take 
up the manufacture of this garment which has been of such value to 
feminine humanity. Something like five or six successful factories have 
been started either directly or indirectly as the result of ours." The 
shirt waist factory of the S. M. Foster Company is now one of Fort 
Wayne's leading manufacturing institutions. The foundation of the 
German-American National bank, in 1904, with Mr. Foster as its pres- 
ident, has left the conduct of the manufacturing business largely to his 
associates, while his personal attention is centered more closely upon 
the business of the bank. For a long time Mr. Foster was the president 
of one of the city's most important manufacturing enterprises, the Wayne 
Knitting Mills, and he now holds the place of chairman of the board of 
directors of the institution. Besides his large stock interests in various 
Fort Wayne institutions, he is one of the owners of the plant of the 
Western Gas Construction Company, makers of gas holders and gas- 
making apparatus; he holds a valuable interest in the Fort Wayne Box 
Company, makers of paper boxes and cartons. Besides the presidency 
of the German- American National bank, Mr. Foster holds a like position 
with the German-American Trust Company, a state institution with a 
south side branch. Ever since the creation of the Lincoln National Life 
Insurance Company, now recognized as one of the best-managed and 
most rapidly growing institutions of its kind in America, he has held 
the responsible position of president. Mr. Foster, when asked to state 
the most important item of his activities as it bears upon the public 
good, refers to an incident of about twenty years ago when he precipi- 
tated a fight for the principle that interest on public funds should not 
pass into the hands of the official in charge of the public's business, but 
should belong to the people and be used for their benefit. On this issue 
Mr. Foster was elected a member of the Fort Wayne board of school 
trustees. After a prolonged contest, funds that had long passed into 
private pockets were diverted to public uses. His fight resulted in the 
present depository law which requires that interest on all public funds 
is to be turned back to the public. Mr. Foster served one term as school 
trustee, and with the interest received during that time, together with 
his salary as trustee, the site of the present public library was purchased. 
This was done in 1895. That the opposition to Mr. Foster's stand was 
decidedly strong is shown by the fact that 204 ballots were required to 
elect him and the session of the city council extended to the hour of 2 
o'clock in the morning. In 1913, Mr. Foster was offered by President 
Woodrow Wilson the position of ambassador to the Argentine Republic, 
but he declined the honor. In company with his wife, Mr. Foster, in 
1907, visited southern Europe, and, during 1909, they visited "the land 
of the midnight sun." In 1912 they made a voyage around the world. 
Mr. Foster was married in June, 1881, to Margaret Harrison, of Fort 



194 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Wayne. They have one daughter, Alice Harrison, the wife of Fred H. 
McCulloeh, grandson of Hugh MeCulloch, the first controller of the 
currency of the United States and the secretary of the treasury under 
three presidents. Mr. Foster is prominent in Masonic circles as a holder 
of the Thirty-second degree in the Scottish rite. He is an Elk, a Moose, 
a member of the Fortnightly club, president of Hope Hospital Associ- 
ation and president of the Associated Charities, and is affiliated with 
many other important movements. In 1911 Governor Marshall appointed 
him a trustee of Purdue University, in which capacity he is still serving. 
Governor Samuel M. Ralston, in 1916, appointed Mr. Foster as a member 
of the Indiana Centennial Commission having in charge the state-wide 
celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the admission of Indiana 
to the sisterhood of states. The fondness of Mr. Foster for fine horses 
is shown in his favorite pastime of horseback riding. During recent 
years Mr. Foster has devoted much time to the subject of taxation, and 
it is through his efforts that the attention of the people of Indiana is 
called to many unjust features of the present statutes. In 1915, Mr. 
Foster sold his fine home on "West "Wayne street to the Loyal Order of 
Moose and erected two attractive homes on South Fairfield avenue, one 
for himself and wife and the other for his daughter. In 1909, in con- 
nection with his brother, David N. Foster, he gave to the city of Fort 
"Wayne, Foster Park, the largest and in some regards the finest of the 
public parks. Foster Park will preserve forever the name of the brothers 
who in this way, as in many others, have given of their best selves to 
the upbuilding of their home city. 

Louis Fox. — The many interests and activities of Louis Fox are the 
most suggestive evidences of his efforts to bring to a high standard of 
success those enterprises which have required the combination of in- 
tellect and means to insure their growth and stability. During the 
period of his entire life in Fort Wayne, Mr. Fox has exerted a splendid 
influence upon the development of many enterprises in which have been 
required those sterling elements which he has known so well how to 
provide. He was born in Fort Wayne, March 8, 1852, a son of George 
and Mary Fox. The father was a native of Germany, and the mother 
cam.e from Switzerland. They engaged in the confectionery and baking 
business, beginning in 1863, and continued in it with growing 
success. The father died on October 13, 1892. The mother 
died, August 10, 1891. Three children were born to George and Mary 
Fox, namely, August L. and Joseph "V., both deceased, and Louis, the 
subject of this sketch. Louis Fox received his education in the Catholic 
and public schools of Fort Wayne. He fitted himself for a commercial 
career by attending business college. His first endeavors in the business 
world were with the ^'vholesale grocery and confectionery house of Huestis 
& Hamilton, where he gave special attention to the details of the candy 
trade, which better fitted him to engage with his father in the manu- 
facture of confectionery and baked goods. This connection was con- 
tinued until June 1, 1877, when Mr. Fox formed a partnership Avith H. J. 
Trputman in a wholesale cracker and confectionery establishment. In 
1882, he purchased Mr. Trentman's interests and conducted the busi- 
ness alone until June 11, 1890, when the United States Baking Company 
bought the business and engaged Mr. Fox as manager; he was also a 
director in the purchasing concern. In 1898, the United States Baking 
Company sold its interests to the National Biscuit Company, and Mr. Fox 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 195 

continued as manager of this concern until June 1, 1902, when he resigned 
and retired from active business. "I have passed by fiftieth birthday," 
said Mr. Fox, "and I desired to retire from active business, this being 
my twenty-fifth year in the cracker and candy business in Fort Wayne." 
His retirement did not remove him from the active business workl, for 
Mr. Fox is that type of energetic, aggressive personality that cannot be 
satisfied with retirement. His many business interests which are closely 
connected with the development of his home city and those of other cities 
to which his influence has spread, have kept him active in the business 
world. He is at the present time the president of the Hartford City (In- 
diana) Paper Company, one of the truly prosperous manufacturing in- 
stitutions of the State ; vice-president of the Tri-State Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, one of Fort Wayne's strongest financial institutions; president of 
the Medical Protective Company, the largest insurance company engaged 
exclusively in that class of insurance ; president of the Fort Wayne 
Postal Telegraph Company; president of the Fort Wayne District Tele- 
graph Company; president of the Brazil (Indiana) Gas Company; a di- 
rector of the First and Hamilton National Bank ; a director of the Wayne 
Knitting Mills ; a director of the Commercial Land & Improvement Com- 
pany ; a director of the Fort Wayne Corrugated Paper Company, director 
of Wayne Paper Goods Company, director Deister's Miner Supply Com- 
pany, president Tatahuicapa Plantation Company, president of the Lake 
Erie & Fort Wayne Railroad Company, a trustee of the Catholic Ceme- 
tery Association, and a trustee of St. Paul's Catholic Church. A consider- 
ation of these and the many incidental connections of Mr. Fox with the 
activities of his home city is convincing evidence of the appreciation of 
his clear mind, his agreeable personality and his substantial citizenship. 
Among the most recent enterprises of our city for which Mr. Fox is whol- 
ly responsible is the erection of a mammoth department store building 
on the northeast corner of Calhoun and Washington streets. This build- 
ing will be the largest and best equipped store building in Northern 
Indiana. The property, wdien completed, will represent an investment 
of more than one million dollars and is a distinct advance in the up- 
building of this city and an undertaking for which Mr. Fox has received 
the high commendation of all who are interested in the growth of Fort 
Wayne. Mr. Fox was married on September 2, 1875, to Sophia Lau, 
dau'ghter of Thomas and Mary Lau. Mr. Lau was an architect and build- 
er of Fort AVayne. To Louis Fox and wife were born three children: 
Rose M., wife of Charles M. Niezer, to whom have been born one son, 
Louis Fox, and two daughters, Rosemary Lau and Margaret Sarah. Rob- 
ert L. and Oscar A. Fox, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Fox, are engaged in busi- 
ness in Fort Wayne under the firm name of Fox Brothers & Company, 
retail dealers in furniture and house furnishings. Robert L. married 
Edna Reuss, daughter of John B. and Amelia Reuss, of this city, and 
they have one daughter, Virginia Mary. Oscar A. w^as united in marriage 
with Alma Zangerle, daughter of a prominent furniture manufacturer of 
Chicago, and they thave two daughters — Aneta Lucille and Nancy Alma — 
and one son, Louis Arthur. Louis Fox is a staunch adherent to principles 
of the Democratic party. He is a member of the Fort Wayne Lodge of 
Elks, of the Fort Wayne Country Club, of the Commercial Club, The 
Knights of Columbus, and of St. Paul's Catholic Church. The confidence 
of the citizens of Fort Wayne in Louis Fox as a desirable leader of the 
people is shown in their frequent appeals to him to serve in large official 



196 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

capacities. His inclinations have caused him to decline the nomination 
for the mayoralty on several occasions. He has, however, served as a 
member of the city council from the sixth ward, and there gave the bene- 
fit of his voice and influence to the making of a greater Fort AVayne. 
As a member of the city Board of Park Commissioners, he has done much 
to bring about a development of the present splendid park and boulevard 
system. His business experience has not been without its discouraging 
circumstances. In 1889, for example, a fire destroyed in its entirety his 
factory building, located at Calhoun and Jefferson streets. Mr. Fox 
merely used this as an occasion for expansion and larger endeavor. His 
home life has been of the happiest. Mrs. Fox was called from earth, Sep- 
tember 21, 1914. In the enjoyment of her companionship Mr. Fox had 
made a number of European voyages, visits to Mexico, Central and South 
America and other portions of the old and new world. There now re- 
mains the memory of this companionship and the presence of the chil- 
dren and grandchildren to add to the pleasure of his later days. 

Henry Franke established, in 1893, his present thriving business 
industry in Fort Wayne, where he has a well-equipped and essentially 
modern plant devoted to the manufacturing of special lines of lumber 
products, particular attention being given to the output of high-grade 
interior finish, the same being used almost entirely by local contractors 
and builders in Allen county. Ability and well-ordered energy have made 
the enterprise a most prosperous one and the establishment is situated at 
1215 Hugh street. In initiating the business Mr. Franke began oper- 
ations with a modest equipment driven by horse power. Later he utilized 
steam power and, keeping in touch with modern progress, he now oper- 
ates his machinery by electricity. He gives employment to an average 
force of sixteen persons and is one of the reliable and highly esteemed 
business men of the city that has been his home for nearly forty years. 
Henry Franke was born at Petershagen, AA^estphalia, Germany, on Sep- 
tember 8, 1857, and is a son of Christian and Sophia (Uphoff) Franke, 
both of whom passed their entire lives in that section of the great empire 
of Germany, the father having been a carpenter by trade and vocation. 
He whose name introduces this review gained his early education in the 
schools of his native town, principally in the Lutheran parochial schools, 
and thereafter learned the carpenter's trade under the effective direction 
of his father. In 1881, when twenty-three years of age, he severed the 
home ties an(;l set forth to make his way in America, where he felt assured 
of better opportunities for gaining independence through individual ef- 
fort. In that year he established his home in Fort "Wayne, and here he 
worked at the carpenter's trade with Charles Krudorf for some time. 
Later he engaged independentlj^ in business as a contractor and builder, 
and in 1893 he founded his present excellent business enterprise, as 
previously noted. About 1902 he also established at Wayne Trace, this 
county, the Farmers' Lumber & Shingle Company, and in the control 
of this business likewise he has been definitely successful. Mr. Franke 
is always ready to aid in the support of those things that tend to advance 
the welfare of the community, but he has had no desire for public office 
or the affairs of politics. Both he and his wife are zealous members of 
Emanuel Lutheran church. February 22, 1882, recorded the marriage 
of Mr. Franke to Miss Wilhelmina Graeper, daughter of William Graeper, 
of Westphalia, Germany, where Mrs, Franke was born and reared, as 
was also her husband. Of the three children of this ideal union the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 197 

eldest is William, who is actively identified with Fort Wayne business 
interests. He wedded Miss Marie Hartwig and they have four children — 
Henry, Esther, Florence and Richard. Bertha, the second of the children, 
is the wife of George Buehler, of Toledo, Ohio, and Emma, the youngest 
child, remains at the parental home. 

Eldridge Franklin has proved himself an efficient and versatile factor 
in connection with practical electrical enterprise and now holds the posi- 
tion of superintendent of overhead construction in the light and power 
department of the Fort Wayne & Northern Indiana Traction Company, 
with residence and official headquarters in the city of Fort Wayne. His 
technical knowledge of applied electricity is equaled by his practical 
and executive ability and he is one of the representative young men 
in the employ of the important corporation mentioned. Mr. Franklin 
was born in Chariton county, Missouri, on April 13, 1889, and is a son 
of Marcellus and Anna (Davis) Franklin, both of whom were born and 
reared in Missouri, where they passed their entire lives, the father having 
been a contractor during the major part of his active business career. 
They became the parents of seven children, of whom the first born, 
Maggie, is deceased; Arthur Frederick resides in the city of Omaha, 
Nebraska; Eldridge, of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; 
Edward Earl maintains his home at Moberly, Missouri; Florence is the 
wife of William Meyers, of Delphi, Carroll county, Indiana ; and Thomas 
died in childhood. Eldridge Franklin gained his early education in the 
public schools of his native state and was a lad of thirteen years at the 
time of his mother's death. He was then taken into the home of his 
maternal grandparents, on whose farm, in Chariton county, Missouri, 
he remained two years, in the meanwhile continuing to attend school. 
In his native county he finally entered Salisbury University, in which 
excellent institution he continued his studies three years, with special 
attention given to electrical engineering. Upon leaving the university 
Mr. Franklin came to Indiana and assumed a position in the employ 
of Delphi Electrical Company, at the judicial center of Carroll county. 
He continued in the service of this company until January 1, 1909, when 
he came to Fort Wayne and entered the employ of the Fort Wayne & 
Northern Indiana Traction Company, with which he has since been con- 
nected and with which his ability and effective service have led to his 
advancement to the position noted in the opening lines of this article. 
Mr. Franklin is found aligned as a loyal supporter of the cause of the 
Republican party, he and his wife are communicants of St. Patrick's 
Catholic church, and he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Improved Order of Red Men, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and the Tribe of Ben Hur. In 1904 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Franklin to Miss Mary Sales, who was born and reared at Delphi, 
this state, and they became the parents of three children — Esther Mary, 
Thomas Marcellus, and Eldridge, Jr., the last mentioned having died in 
infancy. 

Henry Freeh. — More than sixty years ago, when he was a lad of about 
ten years, this venerable citizen of Fort Wayne accompanied his parents 
on their immigration from Germany to America, in 1853, and the family 
home was establisher on a pioneed farm in Aboite township, this county. 
Here the subject of this review lived up to the full tension involved in 
reclaiming from the forest a productive farm and eventually it devolved 
upon him to develop a farm for himself. In the most significant way did 



198 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

he honor and show his loyalty to the land of his adoption when the Civil 
war was precipitated, for he was one of the sturdy young men who went 
forth from Allen county to do valiant service in defense of the Union. 
As a soldier of the republic he made a record that shall ever reflect dis- 
tinction and honor upon his name. Mr. Freeh was born in the Kingdom 
of "Wurtemberg, Germany, October 8, 1843, and thus he has now passed 
the psalmist's span of three score years and ten, so that, having borne 
the heat and burden of the day, he has justified himself to the world and 
well merits the gracious peace and prosperity that attend him now that 
he has retired from the active responsibilities that long developed upon 
him. He is a son of Henry and Christina (Exter) Freeh, of whose six 
children four attained to maturity, the subject of this review being now 
the only survivor of this sterling pioneer family of Allen county. The 
other three who grew to maturity in this county and who have passed 
from the stage of life's mortal endeavors were Frederick, John and 
Christina. Upon coming to Allen county, in 1854, Henry Freeh, Sr., 
purchased eighty acres of timbered land in Aboite township, and his 
initial work was to make a clearing for the little log house which he built 
as the family home. He eventually improved a productive farm and on 
this old homestead he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, 
their names meriting enduring place on the roll of the sterling pioneers 
of Allen county. Both were zealous communicants of the Lutheran 
church and in politics he became a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party. Henry Freeh, Jr., the immediate subject of this sketch, 
acquired his rudimentary education in his native land and as a boy at- 
tended for a time the pioneer district school in Aboite township, though 
he early found that the arduous work of the home farm demanded the 
greater part of his attention. He did well his part in reclaiming the land 
and continued to assist his father until there came the call of higher duty, 
with the outbreak of the Civil war. In 1862, at the age of eighteen 
years, he enlisted as a private in Company B, Twelfth Indiana Infantry, 
and with this gallant command continued in service until the close of the 
war, when he received his honorable discharge. He took part in many 
of the important engagements marking the progress of the great conflict 
and was always found at the post of duty. He took part in battles at 
Richmond, Kentucky, Vicksburg, Mississippi and Jackson, Mississippi, 
and in connection with the memorable Atlanta campaign he participated 
in the battles of Missionary Ridge, New Hope Church and Kenesaw 
Mountain, as well as the siege and capture of Atlanta July 22-28, 1864. 
Thereafter he was with his command in the engagements at Jonesboro, 
Savannah, Columbia, Bentonville and Raleigh, in connection with Sher- 
man's historic march to the sea, and within his military career he was 
in every southern state except Texas and Florida. He marched more than 
six thousand miles, and Frank Aveline, the original captain of his com- 
pany, met death in the battle of Missionary Ridge. Mr. Freeh w^itnessed 
and assisted in the burning of the city of Columbia, South Carolina, and 
after the final surrender took part in the Grand Review, in the city of 
Washington. After his return to Fort Wayne Mr. Freeh was here en- 
gaged in the ice business for a time and then bought eighty acres of 
unimproved land in Aboite township. His first domicile was a primitive 
log house which he erected on his land, and he cleared an dimproved 
the farm, to which he later added forty acres. He made this one of the 
fine farms of the township and the excellent buildings that now mark 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 199 

the place were erected by him. He remained on the old homestead until 
1912, since which time he has lived retired in Fort AVayne, where his 
home is at 754 West Superior street. Mr. Freeh has never faltered in 
his allegiance to the Republican party and his first vote for president was 
cast for President Lincoln, he having been at the time in service as a 
soldier of the Union. He has vitalized the more gracious memories and 
associations of his military career through forty years of appreciative 
affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic, in Sion S. Bass Post, 
No. 40, at Fort Wayne. He was reared in the faith of the Lutheran 
church and has ever held to the same, as did also his loved and devoted 
"wife, the supreme loss and bereavement in his life having come wh^n 
she was summoned to eternal rest June 13, 1914. On October 4, 1870, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Freeh to Miss Jennie Birely, a 
daughter of David and Anna (Bowser) Birely, who came from Pennsyl- 
vania to Allen county many years ago and here passed the residue of 
their lives. Concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Freeh brief record 
is entered in conclusion of this review : Frank is the owner of a valuable 
ranch in the state of Colorado, where he maintains his home ; Anna is 
the wife of John Clark, of Perry township ; Ida is the wife of Grant 
Simmons, of Huntington county; Charles resides upon and operates the 
old homestead farm, in Aboite township ; Jessie is the wife of Henry 
William McMaken, of Aboite township ; and Florence is the wife of Carl 
Garting, a farmer of Lake township. Mr. Freeh receives from his chil- 
dren the deepest filial devotion and takes just pride in the fact that he 
has twenty-one grand-children. 

Charles Freese has been for many years actively identified with the 
drug business in his native city of Fort Wayne and is now one of the 
leading exponents of this important line of retail enterprise in Allen 
county. In 1910 he organized the Dreier Drug Company, which took 
over the old established Dreier drug store, at 526 Calhoun street, and 
he has since continued as the active executive and manager of the well- 
ordered establishment, which is kept up to the best metropolitan standard 
and which receives a representative supporting patronage, besides which 
they also own a drug store at 1402 Calhoun street. Mr. Freese was 
born in Fort Wayne August 2, 1860, and is a son of William A. and 
Sophia (Rehling) Freese, both of whom were born in Germany and were 
young folk at the time when they came to America, about the year 1847, 
and numbered themselves among the pioneers of Allen county, Indiana. 
Here their acquaintanceship was formed and here their marriage was 
solemnized, at Fort Wayne, in 1853. Of their three children the subject 
of this review is the youngest; Amelia is the wife of George Nill, of 
Fort Wayne; and William A., Jr., likewise resides in this city. The 
father gave his attention principally to lumber' manufacturing during 
the period of his residence in Indiana, was a sterling representative of 
that fine element of German citizenship and progress of Allen county, 
and he was comparatively a young man at the time of his death, in 1861. 
His wife survived him by more than half a century and was one of the 
venerable pioneer women of Allen county at the time of her death, in 
May, 1914. Both of the parents were lifelong and earnest communicants 
of the Lutheran church. Charles Freese made good use of the advan- 
tages offered by the public schools of Fort Wayne and, in 1877, when 
about seventeen years of age, entered upon a practical apprenticeship 
in the Dreier drug store. Within his four years' service in this estab- 



200 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

lishment he gained a thorough technical knowledge of pharmacy and 
upon severing his connection with the Dreier firm went to the city of 
Chicago, where he held a position in a similar establishment for the 
ensuing two years. He then returned to Fort Wayne and for virtually 
a quarter of a century thereafter continued in the employ of the Meyer 
Brothers' Drug Company. He is thus to be considered as one of the 
veteran representatives of the drug business in his native city, and upon 
leaving the Meyer company's employ he purchased the old established 
Dreier drug store, in which he had served his apprenticeship, and in 1910 
effected the organization of the Dreier Drug Company, of which he is 
vice-president. His wide acquaintanceship and unqualified personal pop- 
ularity have proved potent in expanding the business of the company 
and as practical manager of 'the establishment he has brought to it a 
large contingent of new and appreciative patrons. Mr. Freese is a staunch 
Republican, but has never had any ambition for public office or for the 
activities of so-called practical politics. He is a member of the Fort 
Wayne Rotary Club and is affiliated with the local lodge of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. Both he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the English Lutheran church. In 1906 Mr. Freese wedded Miss 
Louise Bulmahn, who likewise was born and reared in Fort Wayne, and 
who is a daughter of Henry E. Bulmahn. 

Henry F. Freese, one of the representative young business men 
of Allen county, is secretary and treasurer of the New Haven Floral 
Company, which has a large and modern plant at New Haven and is one 
of the leading concerns engaged in high-grade floriculture in Northern 
Indiana. Adequate description of the green houses and business of the 
company is given on other pages, in the sketch of the career of the vice- 
president and general manager of the company, Herman J. C. Leitz. 
Henry F. Freese was born in the city of Fort AVayne, April 18, 1891, son 
of August and Christina (Kiel) Freese, both natives of Munden, Kingdom 
of Hanover, Germany, whence they came to America and established their 
home in Fort Wayne, about the year 1881. August Freese was engaged 
in the retail grocery business in this city for a number of years and is now 
at the head of a substantial wholesale liquor business in Fort Wayne, 
his loyalty and progressiveness being denoted by his active membership 
in the Fort Wayne Commercial Club. Both he and his wife are com- 
municants of the parish of Emmaus German Lutheran church. Concern- 
ing their children brief record is here given: Fred is deceased; August 
remains at the parental home ; Herman is deceased ; Henry F., of this 
sketch, was the fourth ; Wilma and Esther are with their parents ; Elsie is 
deceased ; and Lydia is the youngest member of the parental home circle. 
Henry F. Freese gained his early education in the Lutheran parochial 
schools in Fort Wayne and thereafter completed an effective course in 
the International Business College, one of the well conducted educa- 
tional institutions of Fort Wayne, where also he availed himself of the 
advantages of Concordia College. After leaving school he was em- 
ployed two and one-half years in the Fort Wayne plant of the General 
Electric Company, as an office assistant, and for two years thereafter 
held a position in the office of the firm of Freese & Gale, of which his 
father is senior member. He next was employed two years in the offices 
of the Cushion Heel Shoe Company, at Fort Wayne, and in February, 
1914, became secretary and treasurer of the New Haven Floral Company, 
to the affairs of which he has since given his close attention. In politics 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 201 

he is an independent voter, he is one of the vital and progressive members 
of the New Haven Commercial Club and he still retains membership in 
Emmaus Lutheran church in Fort Wayne, as does he also in various 
clubs and subsidiary organizations of this flourishing parish. On No- 
vember 16, 1915, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Freese to Miss 
Louise M. Yergens, daughter of Gustav and Minnie (Klett) Yergens, of 
Fort Wayne, and they make of their pleasant home in New Haven a verit- 
able center of generous hospitality. 

John Freiburger. — After years of conscientious application to the 
industry of farming, John Freiburger found himself in a position where 
he might retire and enjoy the fruits of his labors. He has lived quietly 
on his home farm in Sheldon since 1877. Mr. Freiburger was born in 
Alsace, France, on April 1, 1849, and in 1855 came with his parents to 
American shores, settling soon thereafter in Allen county, Indiana. He 
was reared to farm life and as a young man spent some little time in 
Fort Wayne. He was devoted to the country, however, and in 1897 
bought a small farm of seventy-five acres in Pleasant township, to which, 
in later years, he was able to add a forty-acre tract, and on this acreage 
he carried on successful farming activities for many years. He is a 
progressive man in agriculture and his farm is one of the well-kept 
and highly productive places in the township. On September 30, 1873, 
Mr. Freiburger married Miss Mary Miller, the daughter of Christian and 
Lena (Rupp) Miller. The father, it may be said, was of French birth 
and parentage, but the mother was of Russian ancestry. They were 
among the early pioneer settlers in Allen county, and dated their coming 
from some time in the thirties. They knew all the privations and dangers 
common to the people of their day who braved the wilds in their desire 
to establish independent homes in a new land, and their names go down 
in the history of Allen county among those of her pioneer sons and 
daughters. Seven children came to them, all deceased but two — Cath- 
erine of Fort Wayne, and Mary, the wife of the subject. The others 
were Lou, Frank, Andrew, John and Albert. John Freiburger was him- 
self one of a large family of thirteen children. Barney, the eldest, lives 
in Fort Wayne. Theresa is deceased. John came next. Ignatius is no 
longer living. Joseph is living in Fort Wayne. George died in March, 
1914. Mary M. and Caroline have their homes in Fort Wayne. Peter 
is located in Wisconsin, Antony is established in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 
The three youngest children died in childhood. To Mr. and Mrs. Frei- 
burger have come thirteen children, Catherine lives in Lafayette, Indiana. 
Albert and Clara are identified with Fort Wayne. Edward is located 
in Lafayette. He is a priest in the Roman Catholic church, and serves 
in his priestly capacity at St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum. Ignatius lives 
in Ossian. Laurette is in Alliance, Ohio. Mary has honored the family 
by her entrance into a sisterhood. Providence. Ambrose lives in Shel- 
don. Ida died June 11, 1914. Rose, Eugene, Estella and Priscilla are 
still members of the family home. All are members of the Roman Cath- 
olic church, and Mr. Freiburger is a Democrat in his political faith. 

Anselm Fuelber is one of the specially honored and influential repre- 
sentatives of the sterling German element of citizenship that has contrib- 
uted much to the civic and material advancement and prosperity of Fort 
Wayne. He is a man of fine intellectual and professional attainments, 
has been prominently concerned with newspaper enterprise in Fort 
Wayne, but he is now giving his attention principally to the practice 



202 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of law and to the insurance business. He is known and valued as one 
of the loyal and public-spirited citizens of Fort "Wayne and is definitely 
entitled to specific recognition in this history of Allen county. A mem- 
ber of a family of five children, Mr. Fuelber is the only representative 
of the family to have established a home in the United States, he being 
the youngest of the children and his mother having died at the time 
of his birth. His father, Edward Fuelber, was a prosperous farmer in 
Germany, and there passed his entire life. He whose name initiates this 
article was born in Germany on April 19, 1851, and in his native land 
received excellent educational advantages, including a course in the law 
department of the great University of Berlin, in which he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1875, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
In 1878, as a young man of twenty-seven years, Mr. Fuelber came to 
America and for the first four years maintained his residence in the city 
of New Haven, Connecticut. He then passed a year at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
from which city he came to Fort Wayne in 1883. The greater part of 
his active business career has been marked by close and effective alliance 
with newspaper enterprise, and as a writer he has proved specially strong 
in a literary sense as well as influential in the directing of popular sen- 
timent and action. For twenty-five years he was connected with the 
Fort Wayne Staats Zeitung, and for four years thereafter was manager 
and editor-in-chief of the Fort Wayne Abend Post. Since his retirement 
from active journalistic work he has given his attention primarily to the 
insurance business, besides which he is making effective application of 
his ability as a laAvyer, though he has held his professional ability in this 
line as incidental and supplemental to his activities in connection with 
other fields of business. Well fortified in his political convictions, Mr. 
Fuelber has been an effective advocate of the principles and policies of 
the Democratic party, but he is not constrained by strict partisanship 
and is a stalwart supporter of the policy of a high protective tariff for 
the country of his adoption, as he has made a close study of governmental 
and economic questions. He holds membership in representative German 
societies in his home city and also is affiliated with the local lodge of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His interest in local affairs 
has been loyal and insistent and he served three years as a trustee of 
the Fort Wayne board of education, the Bloomingdale, Washington and 
Smart school buildings having been erected while he was the incumbent 
of this office. In 1885 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fuelber to 
Miss Anna Rath, who was born in Germany and who accompanied her 
parents, Dr. August Rath and Caroline (Adam) Rath on their immi- 
gration to America, the family home having been established at Fort 
Wayne in 1877 and the parents having here passed the residue of their 
lives. Doctor Rath having become one of the representative physicians 
and surgeons of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Fuelber have one son, Otto E., 
who is engaged in the law business in Fort Wayne, as a member of the 
firm of Harper & Fuelber, with offices in the Shoaff building; he 
wedded Miss Edna McClaren, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and they have 
two children — McClaren A., and Harriet. 

Otto E. Fuelber is making his native city of Fort Wayne the stage 
of his successful endeavors as one of the well-fortified and ambitious 
younger members of the Allen county bar, and in the practice of his 
profession is associated with James B. Harper, this alliance having 
obtained since 1912, the year of his graduation in the law school. Mr. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 203 

Fuelber was born in Fort Wayne on February 24, 1890, and is a son of 
Anselin and Anna (Rath) Fuelber, who still reside in this city. He 
profited duly by the advantages afforded in the public schools and the 
International Business College of Fort Wayne, and in the meanwhile 
had formulated definite plans for his future career. Following the course 
of his ambition, he entered the law department of the great University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1912 and from which he received his degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. He was forthwith admitted to the bar of his native state and 
has since been engaged in active practice in his native city, where he 
is proving himself resourceful and successful both as a trial lawyer and 
as a counselor well grounded in the involved science of jurisprudence. 
Mr. Fuelber is aligned as a staunch advocate of the cause of the Demo- 
cratic party and takes an active interest in local affairs of a public 
order. On June 6, 1913, was recorded his marriage to Miss Edna Mae- 
Laren, daughter of Henry and Harriet B. MacLaren, of Ann Arbor, Mich- 
igan, and they have two children — MacLaren A., who was born January 
18, 1915, and Harriet, who was born April 28, 1916. 

John F. Fuelling is one of the progressive farmers and loyal citizens 
claimed by Milan township, his being one of the large and well improved 
landed estates of Allen county, and his achievements having marked 
him as a man of special energy, enterprise and mature judgment. He is 
a scion of a sterling pioneer family of Northern Indiana and was born 
on a farm in Adams county, this state. May 17, 1851, a son of John H. 
and Catherine (Rheinhart) Fuelling, both natives of the state of Georgia 
and both young when they came to Indiana, the respective familiies hav- 
ing established residence in Allen county in the early pioneer days. John 
H. Fuelling was a lad of sixteen years at the time of the family removal 
to Allen county and both he and his father assisted in the work on the 
old Wabash & Erie canal, which gave to Fort Wayne its first definite 
medium of transportation. As a young man John H. Fuelling entered 
claim to a .tract of government land in Adams county, where he re- 
claimed a productive farm from the forest and both he and his wife 
passed the remainder of their lives, secure in the respect of all who know 
them and prospered in the passing years by their earnest and effective in- 
dustry. Of their ten children the second Angel died October 16, 1916. The 
first-born, Elizabeth, died in childhood ; Clamor is the third born ; Amelia 
is deceased ; the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of birth ; and 
the others are Sophia, Jacob, Henry, Lusetta, Charles and Martin. John 
F. Fuelling was reared to the sturdy discipline of the pioneer farm and is 
indebted to the district schools of his native county for his early educa- 
tional discipline. In early manhood he removed to Michigan, and in that 
state continued his activities as a farmer until 1888, when he came to 
Allen county and purchased two hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Section 18, Milan township, and Section 6, Maumee township. Later he 
purchased an additional fifty acres in Section 13, Milan township, and on 
this extensive and valuable rural estate has made the best of improve- 
ments, so that it constitutes one of the valuable farm properties of 
Northern Indiana. As an agriculturist and stock-grower Mr. Fuelling 
brings to bear progressive policies and scientific methods, and thus re- 
ceives the maximum returns from his farm enterprise. His political 
allegiance is given to the Democratic party. The marriage of Mr. Fuell- 
ing was to Miss Louisa Catherine Wolf, who was born and reared in 



204 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Michigan, the date of her nativity having been August 10, 1858. Her 
parents, Frederick and Henrietta (Hackstadt) Wolf, were born in Ger- 
many, but were young at the time of the immigration of the respective 
families to America, their marriage having been solemnized in Michigan, 
where Mr. Wolf long continued as a representative farmer and where 
he passed the remainder of his life, his widow being still a resident of the 
Wolverine State. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf became the parents of four chil- 
dren : Rose and Alfred are deceased ; Mrs. Fuelling was the next in order 
of birth ; and Amanda was the last born. Mr. and Mrs. Fuelling became 
the parents of ten children, all of whom are living except the sixth, 
Theodore, who died at the age of one year. The names of the other 
children are here indicated in respective order of birth : Caroline, Amelia, 
John, Lewis, Henry, INIartin, Charles, Fritz and Bertha. 

Henry Gallmeyer. — In writing of the prosperous young farming 
men of this section, mention should properly be made of Henry Gall- 
meyer, one of the more successful and well known men of his generation 
in Milan toM'^nship. He was born in Allen county, Indiana, August 16, 
1880, a son of Fred and Christina (Brockmiller) Gallmeyer, the father 
a native-born German and the mother a daughter of Adams township in 
Allen county. Fred Gallmeyer came to America in young manhood and 
settled in Fort AVayne, where he met and married Christina Brockmiller, 
and they settled on a farm in Milan township soon after their marriage, 
there spending the rest of their lives. They were parents of twelve 
children — Fred, William, Henry, Hanna, Minnie, Elizabeth, Amelia, 
Sophia, Tena, Emma and two others who died in infancy. All of the ten 
named are living, with the exception of Emma. The children were 
educated in the schools of Milan township, and Henry Gallmeyer was 
introduced to farm life on the home place, of which he later became the 
owner, and he is today carrying on successful farming operations on the 
old homestead farm. He was married, in 1912, to Dora Myers, a daughter 
of John and Anna (Merriman) Myers, both of German birth and ancestry, 
who came to America in 1874 and settled on a farm in Henry county, 
Ohio, later coming to Allen county, Indiana, and settling in Milan town- 
ship, where they are spending the closing years of their lives in the 
home of their daughter, Mrs. Gallmeyer. Mr. Gallmeyer and his wife are 
members of the German Lutheran church, and are prominent in the good 
works of that body. They have a wide circle of friends in and about 
their home community, where their industry and general good citizenship 
have won for them admirable positions. 

Robert B. Garmire, the present efficient court reporter for the Allen 
county court, has fortified his accuracy and marked facility in stenograph- 
ic work by an experience of broad and important order, involving his 
employment in his profession in many different sections of the United 
States. He was born at LaGrange, Indiana, October 10, 1876, and is 
a son of Jacob and Sarah (Young) Garmire. The father and mother 
were born and reared in England and were among the pioneers of La- 
Grange county, Indiana, where the father established his home in 1840 
and where he reclaimed from the veritable wilderness a valuable farm, 
the while he lived up to the full tension of pioneer life in the early days, 
the original home having been a primitive log house and deer and other 
wild game being much in evidence. Jacob Garmire was of German 
ancestry, though he was born in England, as noted, and both he and 
his wife continued to reside in LaGrange county until their death, their 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 205 

religious faith having been that of the Evangelical Lutheran church and 
his political allegiance having been given to the Republican party. Of 
the children the eldest is Preston, who is now a prosperous ranch owner 
and substantial agriculturist in the state of California; Ida is the wife 
of John J. Arnold, who is in the rural mail service, and they maintain 
their home in Fort Wayne; Luther is a resident of California; Estella 
is the wife of Frank Taylor and they reside in the state of Michigan; 
Horace B. is in Texas ; Mary is the wife of George Jenkins, of Michigan ; 
Emma is the wife of George Myers, of LaGrange, Indiana ; Sylvia is 
deceased; and Robert B., of this review, is the youngest of the number. 
In the public schools of his native county Robert B. Garmire continued 
his studies until his graduation in the high school, and as a member of 
the class of 1897 he was graduated in the old Fort Wayne Business 
College, which has lapsed in organization. For four years thereafter he 
was employed in the offices of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Fort Wayne ; 
for the period of eighteen months thereafter he was on a ranch in the 
state of California; he then returned to the employ of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, but resigned his position about a year later, and for 
the ensuing twelve years was engaged in the mail-order business, at 
Fort Wayne. In 1913 he opened in this city a public stenographic office, 
and in this connection he handled a large amount of important work, 
including that of legal documents. In September, 1916, there came con- 
sistent recognition of his ability and character in his appointment to his 
present position, that of official reporter of the Allen county court. He 
had previously served twelve years as deputy coroner of Allen county. 
Mr. Garmire is a staunch advocate and supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party, has received the thirty-second degree of Scottish Rite 
Masonry, besides being affiliated with the Mystic Shrine, in which he 
is first lieutenant of the Shrine Patrol of Mizpah Temple, at Fort Wayne, 
besides which he is a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. On 
June 21, 1900, Mr. Garmire wedded Miss Kathryn Feustel, daughter of 
August and Sophia (Kiefer) Feustel, of Fort Wayne, and the three 
children of this union are Mildred, Dorothy and Robert B., Jr. 

William Clayton Geake, a prominent attorney of Allen county and 
a resident of Fort Wayne, was born in Toledo, Ohio. He is a son of Wil- 
liam and Alice (Clayton) Geake. He received his preliminary education 
in the public schools and in the old I\Iethodist College in Fort Wayne, 
and then entered the University of Michigan, as a law student, and 
graduated with the class of 1900, being admitted to the Indiana bar the 
same year. He then returned to Fort Wayne and opened an office for 
the practice of his profession, soon obtaining a fine clientage and becom- 
ing one of the legal lights of the county. In his political relations he is 
allied with the Republican party and from 1903 to 1907 served as Deputy 
Attorney-General of Indiana under Charles W. Miller. He has also 
served as a member of the Republican State Executive Committee, and 
he is frequently called to sit as special judge in the Superior Court of 
Allen county. Mr. Geake was married April 9, 1903, at Middletown, Pa., 
to Miss Anna 0. Keener, and of this union two children have been born 
— Mary Catherine and William Keener. Mr. and Mrs. Geake are active 
members of Trinity Episcopal Church, in which he formerly served as 
vestryman, and in fraternal affairs he is especially prominent in Masonic 
circles. He has served as master of the Blue Lodge, filled other offices 
in both the local and Grand Lodge, and has been a member of the Su- 



206 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

preme Council of the Scottish Rite. In 1916, at Pittsburgh, Pa., he had 
conferred upon him the Thirty-third degree. 

Julius Gehrig. — One of the pioneer citizens of the town of Grabill, 
in Allen county, is Julius Gehrig, who was one of the organizers of the 
Grabill Lumber Company and is now the head and front of that pro- 
gressive and prospering concern. Practically every industry in the com- 
munity has felt the touch of this man of affairs, and he has done much 
to further the best interests of the town in its various departments of 
civic and industrial life. Mr. Gehrig was born in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, 
April 11, 1866, son of William and Louisa (Kipfer) Gehrig. The father 
was a native of S^atzerland and the mother of Ohio. Some time after 
their marriage they located in Wisconsin and there lived on a farm. The 
father there met his death in a runaway accident, and the mother, prac- 
tically among strangers, gave up the place and returned to Ohio, where 
she might be among her own people. The children who grew to man- 
hood are John, a resident of Woodburn, Indiana ; Julius, of this review ; 
Theodore, of Cedar Creek to-v^nship, and Ferdinand, also of that place. 
After the family had returned to Ohio Julius was sent to live with an 
uncle, who was a farmer, and he had much practical experience there 
up to the age of fifteen years, when he went to live on a neighboring farm 
for a year. In 1883 the mother moved to Indiana and bought a farm in 
Cedar Creek township and this place, with the help of her four sturdy 
sons, she was able to operate very successfully for a number of years. It 
was an eighty-acre place, which they made to pay for itself in a com- 
paratively short time, after which they established a brick yard on it 
and conducted a brick business for some years. They built a brick 
house on the homestead, Julius Gehrig doing practically all the carpenter 
work on it. His aptitude for the work was so marked that after finishing 
the house he turned his attention to carpentry and for ten years was 
engaged in that work. When the town of Grabill was established, Mr. 
Gehrig was one of the foremost men in the organization work that went 
on and he was instrumental in establishing the Grabill Lumber Company, 
of which he is now secretary-treasurer and manager. Other industries 
with which he is prominently connected are the Home Telephone Com- 
pany, the Power & Light Company and the Grabill Realty Company, in 
all of "which he is a shareholder and a member of the board of directors. 
He is also a director in the Grabill State Bank, one of the sturdy financial 
concerns of the county. Mr. Gehrig is a Democrat and a member of 
the Reformed church. He married Lydia Ringenberg, an Allen county 
girl, April 10. 1915, and one son has been born to them — Robert Lee, 
born May 8, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Gehrig have a wide circle of friends 
and acquaintances in Grabill and Allen county and their home is one 
of the social centers of their community. 

William F. Geller. — The purposeful and worthy ambition that makes 
for definite action has been significantly manifested in the career of 
Mr. Geller, who is one of the representative business men and valued 
and progressive citizens of Fort WaATie and who is a native son of this 
•city as well as a scion of an honored pioneer family of Allen county. 
He has by his technical and executive ability and well-ordered efforts 
built up a large and prosperous business enterprise that is the leading 
one of the kind in Fort Wayne, his well-equipped and essentially modern 
bakery, at the corner of Broadway and Washington streets, having the 
be-st of facilities for the manufacturing of staple food products as well 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 207 

as a wide variety of fancy cakes and other fine table delicacies. Li 
connection with the general functions of the enterprise has been devel- 
oped a metropolitan catering department, and the establishment is one 
that is creditable alike to its owner and to the city in which it is situated. 
Mr. Geller was president of the Indiana Master Bakers' Association for 
1916-17, and is now (1917) president of the- Tri-State Master Bakers' 
Association. William F. Geller was born in Fort Wayne on March 17, 
1859, and is a son of Theodore and Catherine M. Geller, both of whom 
continued their residence in this city until their death. The father was 
born in Germany, was a piano-finisher by trade and established his home 
in Fort Wayne more than half a century ago. He had previously lived 
in the state of New York, and it w^as from the old Empire state that 
he went forth to render gallant service as a soldier of the Union in the 
Civil War, in which he was a member of Company H, Seventh New 
York Infantry, his service having continued during practically the entire 
period of the great conflict between the states of the north and the south. 
He whose name introduces this article gained his early education in the 
public schools and he was eighteen years of age w^hen he entered upon 
a practical apprenticeship to the baker's trade, in the old-time Fort 
Wayne bakery owned and conducted by the late Christian Hoftner. He 
fortified himself thoroughly in all details of his trade and continued in 
service at the Hoftner bakery until he attained to his legal majority, 
when he put his technical knowledge to practical use and also showed 
his self-reliance and enterprise by engaging in business in an independent 
way. In 1881 he opened a small bakery a few doors to the south of his 
present establishment, and since 1887 has conducted his substantial busi- 
ness from the present headquarters, in which he gives employment to a 
corps of thirty-five persons. Mr. Geller has shown much progressive- 
ness and initiative ability in the developing of his large and prosperous 
business and has not only achieved substantial success but has also 
made the same a medium for expressing in a practical way his civic 
loyalty and public spirit, though he has manifested no desire for public 
office. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party, he is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and the National Union, and he and his wife are communicants of Christ 
church parish of the Lutheran church. In 1882 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Geller to Miss Cecelia M. Neal, who was born and reared 
in Darke county, Ohio, her father having been a representative farmer 
in Jefferson township, Allen county. Mr. and Mrs. Geller have four 
children— Mabel, Willard H., Walter N., and Arthur E. Mabel is the 
wife of Leo E. Danuser, of. Detroit, Michigan, and the three sons still 
remain in their native city of Fort Wayne. 

Anna C. Genth is the representative of a family that came to Allen 
county many j^ears ago and has been identified with the growth and 
progress of the county from then down to the present date. She is the 
daughter of Lewis and Catherine Witzgall, who were of German birth 
and ancestry, and who settled first in Stark county, Ohio, and later in 
Allen county, Indiana. The father w'as a weaver by trade and worked 
some at that industry, but for the most part devoted himself to farming, 
in which he found a pleasing success. Coming to Allen county, they 
bought forty acres of land, later adding an eighty-acre tract to their 
holdings, and they lived on their farm home until death claimed them, 
when they were well advanced in years, though the latter years of their 



208 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

lives were spent in quiet retirement from farm duties. They were the 
parents of six children. William lives in Pleasant township, Anna C. is 
the subject of this sketch, Martin is deceased, Caroline lives in North 
Dakota, Lewis is settled in Marion township, and Katie is the wife of 
Jake Kimmell. Anna C. Witzgall married William August Genth on 
January 9, 1874. He was a son of Adam Genth, who came from Germany 
in young manhood and settled on land in Allen county, there spending 
the remainder of his life. William A. Genth w^as born in Allen county 
on March 18, 1848, educated in the schools of his native community, and 
reared to a thorough knowledge of farm life under the instructions of 
his father. After he left the parental roof he was employed for a number 
of years, and then bought a farm of his own to which he took his young 
wife. His first purchase was a sixty-acre tract, and he was able a little 
later on to add one hundred and twenty acres to his holdings. Prior 
to his marriage, he devoted some years to his trade as a carpenter, having 
learned that trade after he left home, and he built the house that was 
the family residence for years. He was a Democrat and a member of the 
Evangelical church. In 1913 he retired from active life, his health being 
not as good as usual, and he died on March 20, 1916, at the family home. 
Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Genth. Frank lives in Lafayette 
township. William is on the home place. Walter lives in Lafayette 
township. Albert is also on the home place, as is Adolphus, the youngest 
of the six. Katie, the fifth child, died in infancy. Frank, the eldest son, 
is married and has five children— Edna, Richard, Russell, Marie and Noll. 
William has two children — Valda and Ruth, while Walter has a family 
of six — Mabel, Howard, Roy, Clyde, Virgil and Anna. Mrs. Genth has 
lived a life of quiet industry and is counted among the more depend- 
able women of her community, where she has a host of staunch friends 
who have shared in the beneficient influence shed by her lif and works. 

Rev. Samuel Gerig, who gave earnest and effective service as a clergy- 
man of the Missionary church and was a scion of one of the well known 
and honored families of Allen county, was engaged in the work of the min- 
istry in the west at the time of his death, which occurred Aug. 23, 1909, but 
he ever payed a tribute of loyalty and affection to his native county and 
looked upon the same as his home until the time when he passed from 
the stage of life's mortal endeavors, his A\indow now maintaining her 
residence at Woodburn, one of the attractive and prosperous villages of 
Allen county. Mr. Gerig was a man of strong mentality, broad and prac- 
tical in his views, and his consecrated labors in the vineyard of the 
Divine Master were fruitful in good. Concerning the Gerig family of 
Allen county adequate data are given in other articles in this volume, 
and thus it is not necessary to enter into geneological details in this 
memoir. Samuel Gerig was born on a farm near Grabill, in Springfield 
township, this county, and the date of his nativity was October 15, 1876, 
so that he was but thirty-two years of age when he was summoned to 
eternal rest. His father, Joseph Gerig, gained precedence as one of the 
representative farmers and substantial citizens of Springfield township 
and the family name has been long and worthily identified with the 
history of Allen county. He whose name introduces this review was 
reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm and received his youthful 
education in the public schools of Springfield township. His initial ac- 
tivities of an independent order were in connection with agricultural 
industry, and his deep Christian faith and his high sense of personal 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 209 

stewardship early led him to enter the ministry of the Missionary church, 
as a representative of which he served as pastor of the church at Wood- 
burn. Upon leaving his native state he engaged in active ministerial 
service in Missouri and Kansas, and his faithful labors in these states 
covered a period of seven years. He was residing in Kansas at the time 
of his death, after which his widow returned to Allen county, where she 
has since maintained her home. Mr. Gerig was a loyal supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party and was a young man who commanded 
unqualified popular confidence and esteem, both as a clergyman and as 
a citizen. On June 1, 1899, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Lavina 
Klopfenstein, who likewise was born and reared in Allen county, a 
daughter of Joseph and Anna (Stukey) Klopfenstein, adequate mention 
of the famih'' being given on other pages of this work, in the sketch of 
Joseph Klopfenstein, a half-brother of Mrs. Gerig. Mr. and Mrs. Gerig 
became the parents of five children, all of whom remain with their 
widowed mother in the pleasant home at Woodburn, their names being 
here given in respective order of their birth: Frieda, Jesse, Harry, 
Walter and Irene. Mrs. Gerig earnestly aided her husband in his service 
as a clergyman and is a zealous adherent of the Missionary church. 

Frederick W. Gerke has been a resident of Allen county since his 
boyhood, is a representative of one of the old and honored German 
families of the county and is the fortunate owner of one of the specially 
fine farms of St. Joseph township. Known as one of the most enterprising 
and progressive farmers of that township and, without ambition for 
public office of any kind, he has been influential in community affairs, 
with secure place in popular esteem. Frederick William Gerke was born 
in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, January 27, 1850, a son of Henry 
and Dora (Mandel) Gerke, who immigrated to America in 1855, and 
first settled in Jackson county, Indiana, where they remained four years. 
The family home was then established in Dubois county, Indiana, where 
the father continued his association with agricultural pursuits for six 
years. Removal was then made to Allen county, in 1864, and Henry 
Gerke purchased a tract of land in St. Joseph township, where he de- 
veloped one of the excellent farms of the county and became one of the 
substantial agriculturists and valued citizens of his township. He 
achieved through his industry and good management a large measure of 
material prosperity and when well advanced in years retired from active 
labors and removed to the citj'' of Fort AVayne, where he and his wife 
passed the remainder of their lives in the generous peace and comfort 
that justly rewarded former years of earnest endeavor, both having 
been devoted communicants of the German Lutheran church. They be- 
came the parents of three children — John, Anna E. and Frederick W. 
He whose name introduces this review Avas about four years old at the 
time of the family immigration to the United States, and he attended 
school in both Dubois and Allen counties, while he gained his full quota 
of youthful experience in connection with the work of the home farm. 
In 1882 he rented from his father sixty acres of his present farm, in 
Section 29, St. Joseph township, and eventually purchased the property, 
to which he had added forty acres, so that his splendidly improved 
farm now comprises one hundred acres. He erected on the place his 
modern and commodious brick residence and other farm buildings of 
superior order, and everything about the place indicates thrift and good 
management, the farm being given over to diversified agriculture and 



210 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

stock-raising. Taking deep interest in community affairs, but imbued 
with no desire for public oliice, Mr. Gerke is independent in politics and 
gives his support to men and measures meeting the approval of his 
judgment. He and his v^ife are active members of the German Lutheran 
church at Goeglein. In 1882 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gerke 
to Miss Mary Eebber, daughter of Christopher and Clara (Rohe) Reb- 
ber, both of whom were born in Germany, Mr. Rebber having been for 
many years one of the substantial farmers of Allen county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gerke have one son, Henry C, who is engaged in farming at home 
in St. Joe township, his wife, whose maiden name was Addie Busching, 
being a daughter of Henry F. Busching, concerning whom individual 
mention is made on other pages of this publication. 

Joseph F. Getz, senior member of the firm of Getz & Cahill, which 
conducts one of the leading undertaking establishments of Fort Wayne, 
at 1031 Calhoun street, has as his associate in the business James B. 
Cahill, and the enterprise was established by them on September 1, 1907. 
Mr. Getz was born at Mahoning, Mahoning county, Ohio, September 1, 
1860, a son of Charles and Anastasia (Weaver) Getz, who were born and 
reared in Baden Baden, Germany, where their marriage was solemnized, 
and they immigrated to America in 1848. They first established their 
home at New Albany, Franklin county, Ohio, and later removed to Ma- 
honing county, where the father engaged in farming, besides having 
operated coal mines of which he was the owner. He was a Democrat in 
his political proclivities and both he and his wife were communicants of 
the Catholic church, their home having been maintained in the old Buck- 
eye State until the time of their death. Of their children, Angeline is 
the wife of Joseph Schriver, of Salem, Columbiana county, Ohio ; Henry, 
Charles and Joseph F. are all residents of Fort Wayne ; August resides 
at Salem, Ohio, as does also Frances, who is the wife of Herman Voni- 
mon, and Frank likewise maintains his home at Salem ; Florence, the 
youngest of the children is the wife of Carl Baker, of Akron, Ohio. 
Joseph F. Getz acquired his early education in the schools of Salem, 
Ohio, and continued his residence in his native state until 1879, when he 
established his home in Fort Wayne. He was about nineteen years of 
age at the time and for three years gave his attention primarily to the 
buying and shipping of live stock, in connection with which line of en- 
terprise he traveled somewhat widely through the rural districts of In- 
diana. Thereafter he was employed on a stock farm in Allen county 
about three years, and for a comparatively equal period was in other 
employment. He then entered the local service of the Adams Express 
Company in Fort Wayne, in which connection he continued two years. 
For a year thereafter he was identified with the retail grocery business 
and then conducted a retail liquor business five years. For fourteen 
years after his retirement from this field of enterprise he conducted a 
prosperous retail cigar business, upon disposing of which he became as- 
sociated with Mr. Cahill in the establishing of their present business as 
undertakers, embalmers and funeral directors, with facilities of the best 
standard in all particulars. Mr. Getz gives allegiance to the Deraocratc 
party, he and his wife are communicants of the Cathedral parish of the 
Catholic church, and he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, 
the Tribe of Ben Hur, and the U. T. C. On May 25, 1886, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Getz to Miss Louise Perriguey, daughter of Felix 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 211 

and Caroline (Vosier) Perriguey, of Fort Wayne, and they have five 
children : Bernadette is the wife of William Baughraan, of Fort Wayne ; 
Edna is the wife of Harry Miller, of this city; and Arthur, Hilda and 
Clarence remain at the parental home. 

Benjamin F. Geyer, sales manager of the Wayne Oil Tank Company, 
is one of the younger men who are making distinctive impress on the 
business life of Fort Wayne. He was born at Plymouth, Indiana, May 7, 
1882, his parents being Ferdinand F. and Augusta M. (Wollenhaupt) 
Geyer, the former having been born in 1847 in Wurtemberg, Germany, 
and the latter in 1856 at Dayton, Ohio. Benjamin F. was educated in 
the public schools of his native town and of Monroeville, Indiana, the 
family having moved to the latter place. From the local schools he went 
to Indiana University for three years. He taught in the high school of 
Monroeville in 1903-4, and then took a special course in advertising at 
Chicago for two years, concurrent with which he was employed in the 
office of the Western Electric Company. Returning to Monroeville he 
taught another year and in 1907 took a position with Bowser & Company, 
Here he made an excellent record and had become assistant advertising 
manager when, in 1912, he relinquished that place to become advertising 
manager of the Wayne Oil Tank Company, Since then his progress has 
continued and from 1914 he has been, sales manager of this concern. 
Under his guidance the business has already increased upwards of 300 
per cent. Mr. Geyer was married August 24, 1909, to Blanche M., daugh- 
ter of Josiah B. and Mary (Bauserman) Miller. They are members of 
Simpson M. E. church and he is a member of the Masonic order, having 
been Worshipful Master of Monroeville Lodge, No. 293. 

He?iTy W, Gibson. — One of the Marion township farmers who were 
brought up on the soil and have a life-long acquaintance with it is Henry 
W. G'bson, the son of David and Mary (Reichard) Gibson, pioneers to 
Mario :• township from Pennsylvania as early as the year 1864. They 
were r?;Lii Jy and industrious people and acquired a good deal of land 
in and abouL ]^.Iarion township during the years of their residence there, 
and prospered in accordance with their efforts. Mr. Gibson was an early 
Whig and a Democrat from the demise of the first-named party. He 
was Roman Catholic in his church relations, as was also his wife, 
and they reared a family of ten children, of whom only the subject is 
living at this writing. The others were named John, Lydia, Mary, David, 
Daniel, Theresa, Sarah, Susanna and Frank. Henry W. Gibson was 
born in Pennsylvania on March 28, 1847, and accompanied his parents 
to Indiana in 1864. He was educated for the most part in the parochial 
schools, and spent his young life at home on the family farm, working 
with his father and doing his full share toward making the farm a success. 
On the death of the father he inherited a tract of one hundred and forty 
acres, and he has spent his life thus far in the development of the agri- 
cultural industry in Marion township. Excellent buildings are a feature 
of his property, and he carries on a successful business in stock-farming. 
Mr. Gibson was married on January 14, 1873, to Miss Mary Hipler, the 
daughter of John and Catherine (Daneberger) Hipler, who came to Amer- 
ica from Germany in their young lives and settled in Indiana. Mr, and 
Mrs. Gibson became the parents of ten children. Theresa is the wife 
of William Smith, and they make their home in Fort Wayne. John is 
also located in Fort Wayne. Henry, Jr., is at home with his parents. 
Frank lives in Marion township on a farm. Rosa is in Fort Wayne. 



212 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Clemens is in Fort Wayne also, and the four younger children — Leo, 
Ambrose, Mary Marie and Emmett — are to be found in the family home. 
The eldest daughter, Theresa Smith, has four children — Irvin, Eve, Ralph 
and Willard. John also has four children — Mildred, Elmer, Arnold and 
Normand. Frank has three children — Oscar, Monroe and Ruth. 

Mrs. Lucy Gibson, widow of the late David W. Gibson and daughter 
of Edward F. and Margaret (Denney) Farrell, was born in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, on May 20, 1833, and came with her parents to Allen county, 
Indiana, in 1849. They were farmers and lived prosperously and con- 
tentedly on their Allen county farm for the remainder of their lives. 
Mr. Farrell was a Democrat, active in the party ranks, and a member 
of the Roman Catholic church, as was also his wife. They were the 
parents of a family of ten children, of whom only two are living. Briefly 
named, in the order of their appearance, they were Mary M., Margaret, 
Catherine, Lucy, Elizabeth, Dennis, Edward, Charles, John and Frank. 
Lucy is the immediate subject of this review. Edward is living in the 
state of Illinois, and Frank, the youngest of the family, is in Hammond, 
Indiana. Lucy Farrell was married on February 14, 1865, to David W. 
Gibson, who was born on March 5, 1838, in Pennsylvania, and was the 
son of David Gibson, who came to Allen county in the early part of 
the nineteenth century, bought land and established himself in the farm- 
ing industry of the county. He was a successful man and his son shared 
in that prosperity as well. He lived retired for some years prior to his 
death, which took place on February 2, 1912. He was a Democrat and 
a member of the board of trustees of Marion township for some years, 
also serving as township assessor for two terms. He was a man of con- 
siderable prominence in his community, and his passing was a decided 
loss in the township. He was a lifelong member of the Roman Catholic 
church and at the time of his passing had membership in the church at 
Hessen Cassel. To Mr. and Mrs. Gibson were born four children. Agnes 
is the wife of Frank Wyss. Edward is a resident of Marion township. 
Henry and Helen are twins, and both are to be found with the mother 
on the home place, which Henry has managed for some years. Mrs. 
Gibson has fourteen grandchildren to her credit. The eldest daughter, 
Agnes, has eight children, named Charlotte, Celestine, Stella, Frank, 
Aloysius, Clarence, Viola and Verby. Edward has three sons — Walter, 
Andrew and Marchant. Henry's children are Irene, Russel and Rodger. 
Mrs. Gibson is well known in and about Marion township and has a host 
of staunch friends wherever her endearing and estimable qualities are 
known. 

Howard M. Gieseking is a young man who has shown marked initia- 
tive and executive ability and has brought the same to bear most effec- 
tively in connection with farm industry in his native county. He is one 
of the most extensive and successful agriculturists and stock-growers in 
Lake township and insistently utilizes the same careful and well ordered 
business principles that make for success in commercial enterprise but 
that are far too often neglected in connection with the fundamental enter- 
prises of which he is an essentially representative exponent. In the live- 
stock department of his farm operations Mr. Gieseking makes a thorough 
inventory each year and knows to a dollar what gain his stock is making 
each month. The same methods are followed so far as consistent in other 
departments of farm activity, and thus it is not strange that Mr. Gieseking 
is known as a thoroughly progressive business man, even as he is a loyal 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 213 

and public-spirited citizen. He is .associated with certain of his neighbors 
in the ownership of a modern threshing outfit, and the fine traction engine 
that is a part of the equipment is utilized for power. The enterprising 
farmers who are the owners of this excellent outfit have proved in its 
operations the value of the investment, for they not only thresh their 
own grain at minimum cost but also gain an appreciable return for work 
done for other farmers. The cattle shipped from the farm of Mr. Giese- 
king, in 1916, were pronounced by an authority from Purdue University 
to be the best in the state. This is but one assurance of the high standard 
which he maintains in all phases of his farm business, and it is specially 
gratifying to accord to him merited consideration in this history. On 
the old homestead that is an integral part of his present valuable landed 
estate of three hundred and seventy acres, in Lake township, Howard M. 
Gieseking was born on June 1, 1882, a son of William F. and Lydia E. 
(Larimore) Gieseking, both likewise natives of Allen county and repre- 
sentatives of sterling pioneer families of the same. William F. Gieseking, 
long one of the representative and honored citizens of the county, still 
resides on the old homestead with his son, Howard M., his devoted wife 
having passed away in 1907. He has lived on this farm the major part 
of his life, reclaimed much of the land from a semi-improved condition 
and marked the passing years with large and worthy achievement, so 
that he accumulated a large estate and incidentally did much to further 
civic and industrial progress in his native county. All of the land of this 
extensive property, with the exception of fifty acres, lies along the Goshen 
road, and it is one of the best farm properties in Lake township. Howard 
M. Gieseking acquired his preliminary education in the district schools 
of Lake township and supplemented this by direct and special courses 
in the high school at Churubusco. Since he was eighteeja years of age 
he has exercised his energy and administrative ability in connection with 
the operations of the fine homestead farm of which he is now the owner, 
the property having been purchasd by him in 1914. He was the fourth 
in order of birth in a family of five children — Mary, Charles, Alice, 
Howard M., and John — and the only other of the number now living is 
Alice, whose home is at Pueblo, Colorado, and her husband is a traveling 
representative for the Burroughs Adding Machine Company, of Detroit, 
Michigan. After he had purchased the farm from his father, as above 
noted, the subject of this review began the raising and feeding of pure- 
blood white-faced Hereford cattle and pure-bred Duroc- Jersey swine. 
He adopted the scientific methods of feeding advocated in connection 
with the agricultural department of Purdue Univerity, and the balanced 
and selected system of rations has proved its value in no uncertain way 
in his operations. For the May market, in 1917, Mr. Gieseking had thirty- 
nine steers, twenty-two grade heifers, and for the July market one hun- 
dred and five hogs. On his farm he has two of the best type of silos, 
with an aggregate capacity of four hundred and forty tons. The horse 
barn on the model farm is forty-four by sixty feet in dimensions; the 
cattle barn is one hundred and forty by thirty feet; and the sheep 
barn is sixty by thirty-two feet in dimensions. A cement floored 
feeding yard is eighty-two hj one hundred and thirty-five feet in dimen- 
sions; the granary and feed mill is thirty-two by twenty-two feet; and 
a private dynamo and full incidental equipment afi'ords modern lighting 
facilities for both house and the barns, besides supplying power for the 
feed mill and other purposes. Thorough system obtains in every de- 



214 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

partmeut of the farm operations, and the owner gives a most active and 
efficient supervision to all details. He employs from three to five men, 
according to season demands, and it has been consistently said that he 
individually does the work of two men, so indefatigable his energy and 
so great his enthusiasm as a representative of the noble art of hus- 
bandry. Mr. Gieseking is an exemplar, and that in a most practical and 
productive way, of the best systems of scientific agriculture and stock- 
growing, is a leader in the advocating and use of modern methods and 
appliances, and is setting an example well worthy of emulation on the 
part of all who would achieve the maximum of success through farm 
enterprise. His farm has a traction engine of modern type and all other 
mechanical equipments are the best that can be obtained, so that the 
Gieseking farm is a veritable model and one that is a source of general 
pride to Allen county. Mr. Gieseking is a Republican in politics, as is 
also his honored father, and he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On December 24, 1912, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gieseking to Miss Georgia M. Tea- 
garden, who was born and reared in this county, as were also her par- 
ents, Marion and Alice (Jackson) Teagarden, the former of whom is 
deceased and the latter resides in the city of Fort Wayne. Mrs. Gieseking 
is the youngest in a family of six children, and Harvey is the eldest. 
Thomas is deceased ; Edward resides in Fort Wayne, as does also May and 
Edna remains with her widowed mother. Mr. and Mrs. Gieseking have 
no children. Their beautiful home is known for its gracious hospitality 
and is a center of much of the representative social life of the community. 
Charles E. Gilbert has established a unique and notably successful 
business in Fort Wayne, in which his only son, Harold H., is his associate 
in conducting what has been significantly designated as The Letter Shop. 
The offices of the firm are located in the Lincoln Life Insurance Building 
and the best facilities are here afforded for the handling of all kinds of 
typewritten work, with special attention given to multigraphing letters 
and other documents. Employment is given to a corps of seven assistants, 
and the business has met a distinct demand by its service, with the result 
that it has become a substantial enterprise of important order, touching, 
as it does, all lines of human interest — religious, fraternal, educational, 
professional and commercial. Charles E. Gilbert was born in Rockcreek 
township. Wells county, Indiana, on tlanuary 25, 1873, and is a son of 
Emanuel and Lydia Anne (Schoch) Gilbert, the father, now deceased, 
having been a carpenter by trade and also one of the successful farmers 
and influential citizens of Wells county. Charles E. Gilbert passed the 
period of his childhood and early youth on the home farm and is indebted 
to the public schools of his native county for his early education, besides 
which he attended the Indiana State Normal School at Marion for one 
year. January 4, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gilbert to 
Miss Mary Catherine Harker, daughter of David and Sarah (Teeple) 
Harker, of Portland, Jay county, Indiana, and the one child of this union 
is Harold Harker Gilbert. For a number of years Mr. Gilbert was a repre- 
sentative of the International Correspondence Schools, of Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1905 he established his residence and business headquarters 
in Fort Wayne. On April 1, 1908, he showed his initiative, ability and 
progressiveness by founding The Letter Shop, and he has made of the 
enterprise a signal success, as previously intimated in this article. In 
1915 he admitted his only son to partnership in the business, and the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 215 

latter has proved a valuable young coadjutor. Mr. Gilbert, also his son, 
is affiliated with Wayne Lodge No. 25, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
and in addition both have had conferred the degrees of the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite and are also affiliated with the Ancient Arabic 
Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Guy J. Gilbert has proved a resourceful and successful exponent of 
the life-insurance business and in the city of Fort Wayne he maintains 
his official headquarters as general agent for the Lincoln Life Insurance 
Company, of which he had previously served as special representative. 
Mr. Gilbert was born at Worthington, Franklin county, Ohio, on August 
17, 1871, and is a son of Theodore R. and Ellen L. (Johnson) Gilbert, 
the father having been likewise a native of the Buckeye state and having 
devoted the major part of his active business career to mercantile enter- 
prise, he having been a resident of Angola, Indiana, at the time of his 
death. He whose name introduces this article gained his early education 
in the public schools of Angola, Indiana, to which place his parents 
removed when he was a child. As a youth he served for a time as a 
clerk in the mail-order department of the Angola postoffice, and in 1899 
he established his residence in Fort Wayne, where for twelve years he 
was employed in the money order division of the postoffice. He then put 
in one year with the Wildwood building concern. Later he passed eight 
months in the city of Mobile, Alabama, in the service of the Alabama 
Farm Land Company, and since that time has been actively and suc- 
cessfully associated with the Lincoln Life Insurance Company, with which 
he rose from the position of special representative to that of general 
agent, with headquarters in Fort Wayne. Mr. Gilbert is an active member 
of the Fort Wayne Commercial Club, holds membership in the local lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is affiliated with 
the Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity, as is he also with 
the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Gilbert was married in September, 1897, to Miss 
Ida E. Kurrle, of Kendallville, Indiana. She is a daughter of Jacob 
and Katherine Kurrle. They have three children as follows : Donald C, 
Paul H. and Robert B. 

John Gilbert was a man who held himself true and loyal in all of 
the relations of life and who marked the passing years with earnest 
and successful achievement that denoted him as a citizen of worth in 
the community. He was long numbered among the well-known and sub- 
stantial business men of Fort Wayne and here maintained his home for 
nearly thirty-seven years, his age at the time of his death having been 
seventy years and his passing having been counted a distinct loss in the 
community life. Mr. Gilbert was born in Taehau, Bohemia, Austria, of 
German parentage, and the date of his nativity was March 9, 1833. He 
was about nine years of age at the time of his father's death, but the 
devoted mother lived for many years thereafter. He and his brother 
Edward entered upon their school work in Ratisbon, Bavaria, where they 
attended an important educational institution for three years. Within 
a comparatively short time thereafter an uncle who had established him- 
self in business in New York city, as an importer, sent for the two boys, 
and thus the subject of this memoir was enabled to continue his educa- 
tional pursuits in Brooklyn, New York, and eventually to be graduated 
in pharmacy. Young, ambitious and purposeful, he found employment 
in a drug store, and his experience was eventually extended to touch both 



216 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the retail and wholesale phases of the drug business. From New York 
city he responded to a call from London, Ontario, Canada, and after 
having there been employed one year as prescription clerk in a drug 
store, he turned his face westward and located in Rockf ord, Illinois, where 
he was similarly engaged for two years and where he then became the 
proprietor of a drug store, which he conducted until 1866. While a resi- 
dent of Rockford, Mr. Gilbert met and married Harriet P. Mandeville, 
his devoted companion and helpmeet until the close of his life. The cere- 
mony took place May 27, 1861. Mrs. Gilbert was the daughter of Michael 
and Elsie Marie (Corey) Mandeville, who passed the closing years of 
their life in Rockford, where the daughter attended the private and 
public schools of the city, and where her educational advantages included 
those of Rockford College. The Mandeville family was founded in Amer- 
ica in colonial days and the lineage traces back to French-Huguenot 
origin. The father of Mrs. Gilbert was long a successful exponent of 
agricultural industry in Winnebago county. He and his wife were born 
and reared in the state of New York. In 1866 Mr. Gilbert established 
his home in Fort Wayne. He became general manager of the wholesale 
and retail drug business of the firm of Meyer Brothers & Company. 
With this representative Fort Wayne concern he continued his alliance 
fourteen years, and for the ensuing eleven years he held the position of 
district manager for the Standard Oil Company, in which connection he 
made a characteristically admirable record. His death occurred Septem- 
ber 21, 1903. Mr. Gilbert gave loyal allegiance to the Republican party 
and always manifested a broad-minded interest in public affairs, both 
national and local. He was a man whose abiding Christian faith was 
shown in good works and unfailing toleration and kindliness. He Avas 
an earnest and influential member of Plymouth Congregational church, 
in which his widow still retains active membership, both having been 
charter members of this now representative religious organization of Fort 
Wayne. He was a deacon of this church from the time of its organization 
until his death. For many years Mr. Gilbert maintained active and appre- 
ciative affiliation with the Masonic fraternity and he was well known 
and highly honored in both the business and social circles of the com- 
munity that so long represented his home. Besides the widow, Mr. Gilbert 
is survived by an adopted daughter, Gertrude, who is the wife of Pierre 
Plantinga, of Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Gilbert finds in the devotion of her 
many friends in Fort Wayne a measure of solace and consolation now 
that the husband of her youth has passed forward to the ''land of the 
leal," and she delights in extending to her friends the hospitality of 
her pleasant home, at 916 West Washington street. Among the benefi- 
cent acts of Mrs. Gilbert, and one which suggests the kindly spirit which 
has ever pervaded her life, comes down from the year 1910, when she 
presented to the city of Rockford the Mandeville home and the beautiful 
surroundings, consisting of three acres of wooded land. The spot is 
known as Mandeville park. 

George W. Gillie, who assumed the office of sheriff of Allen county 
on January 1, 1917, is giving an administration that fully justified the 
popular choice of the incumbent, and he has become specially well known 
also as a skilled veterinary surgeon, in which connection he was a deputy 
state veterinarian from 1909 to 1913, besides which he is serving at the 
present time as a government inspector for the national bureau of animal 
industry. Doctor Gillie has been a resident of Allen county since his 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 217 

childhood, is a scion of fine Scottish lineage and in his character and 
achievement is a young man who is distinctly exemplifying the sterling 
traits of the race of which he is a representative. He was born in Ber- 
wickshire, Scotland, August 15, 1880, and in that same section of the 
land of hills and heather were born and reared his parents, James and 
Janet (Taylor) Gillie. James Gillie became a successful agriculturist 
and stock-grower in his native land and there continued his residence 
until June, 1882, when he came with his family to the United States, 
and established his residence at Kankakee, Illinois, where he soon after- 
ward was made superintendent of construction in the building of the 
Illinois asylum for the insane. In 1884 he came to Allen county, Indiana, 
and for sixteen years thereafter was a substantial exponent of agri- 
cultural and live-stock industry in Washington townshp. For the ensuing 
ten years he farmed in St. Joseph township, where he then purchased 
a well-improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres. To this place 
he continued to give his effective supervision until his death, which 
occurred October 29, 1911, and his widow still remains on the homestad 
farm. He was a man of lofty integrity and marked energy, was a Repub- 
lican in politics and was a member of the Plymouth Congregational 
church in Fort Wayne, as is also his widow. Mr. Gillie was known for 
his broad mental ken and for his loyal interest in community affairs. 
In the Masonic fraternity his ancient-craft affiliation was with Summit 
City Lodge, in Fort Wayne, and he was a member of the Fort Wayne 
Commandery of Knights Templars, besides being affiliated with the 
Scottish Rite branch of Masonry. He was one of the early members 
of the Caledonian Society of Allen county and in 1889 he effected the 
organization of the Allen County Plowing Association. Of the children 
the present sheriff of the county is the eldest; Peter is likewise a veter- 
inary surgeon and is engaged in the practice of his profession at Mans- 
field, Ohio; Janet died at the age of seven and Jean at the age of six 
years; John A. is one of the successful farmers of St. Joseph township; 
Margaret is the wife of Joseph Pearson, of Ogden, Boone county, Iowa; 
Agnes is the wife of Arthur Boerger, of Fort Wayne ; Harold likewise 
resides in this city; and James S. remains with his widowed mother on 
the farm in St. Joseph township. Dr. George W. Gillie was afforded the 
advantages of the public schools of Fort Wayne and also attended the 
International Business College in this city. In 1901 he completed a short 
course in dairy science and industry at Purdue University, Lafayette, 
this state, and in preparation for his chosen profession entered the 
University of Ohio, at Columbus, in which he was graduated in 1907, 
with the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Surgery. In the following 
year he was appointed milk inspector for Allen county, of which position 
he continued the incumbent until 1913. He engaged also in the general 
practice of his profession and from 1909 to 1913 was retained in the 
position of deputy state veterinarian. He continued in the practice of 
his profession until the autumn of 1916, and his retirement therefrom 
came when he was, at that time, elected sheriff of the county, the duties 
of which office he assumed January 1, 1917. The Doctor is aligned as 
a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican party, is identified 
with the Indiana State Veterinary Association, is affiliated with both 
York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity, as well as the 
adjunct organization, the Mystic Shrine, and both he and his wife are 
popular factors in the social life of their home city. On June 25, 1908, 



218 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Gillie to Miss Grace Nannette 
Merion, who was born and reared in the city of Columbus, Ohio, where 
she was graduated in the state university on the day that her marriage 
occurred, she being a daughter of Charles and Emma (Kienzle) Merion. 
Doctor and Mrs. Gillie have two daughters, Jean M. and Charlotte M. 

Claude F. Gladieux, of New Haven, is a representative of one of the 
honored and influential pioneer families of Allen county and was born 
on the old homestead farm of his father, in Jefferson township, February 
6, 1866. He is a son of Francis and Mary (Lamont) Gladieux, both natives 
of the now stricken province of Alsace, France, which became a part 
of German territory after the close of the Franco-Prussian war and has 
become the stage of tragic military operations incidental to the present 
great European war. Francis Gladieux was but seven years old when 
he accompanied his parents to America and the family home was first 
established in Stark county, Ohio, whence, two years later, removal was 
made to Allen county, Indiana. Peter Gladieux, father of Francis, ob- 
tained a tract of land in Jefferson township and there instituted the de- 
velopment of a farm, both he and his wife having there passed the re- 
mainder of their lives, as sterling pioneers of the county. Francis 
Gladieux was reared to manhood on the home farm, received the ad- 
vantages of the common schools of the locality and period and finally 
became one of the most successful farmers of the county, his death 
having occurred on the old homestead, in December, 1916, and his widow 
still remaining on the place, which is endeared to her by the gracious 
memories of the past. Francis Gladieux wielded much influence in public 
affairs in Allen county, served nine years as county commissioner and 
was for one term a member of the Indiana legislature. On other pages 
of this publication is entered a specific tribute to his memory, and thus 
further review of his career is not required in the present article. Claude 
Francis Gladieux gained physical and mental vigor through his youthful 
association with the work of the home farm and through his studies in 
the public schools of his native township. He continued to assist in the 
affairs of his father's farm until he had attained to the age of twenty- 
nine years, and thereafter continued independent operations as a farmer 
until 1914. In August, 1915, he established his present business enterprise 
at New Haven. He gives his allegiance to the Democratic party, is a 
member of the French-American Society of Allen county, and he and his 
wife are communicants of the Catholic church, in the faith of which they 
were carefully reared. On January 8, 1894, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Gladieux to Miss Jennie Giriodot, who likewise was born and 
reared in Jefferson township, a daughter of Jules and Mary (Borsnet) 
Giriodot, both natives of France. The father is now one of the honored 
retired farmers of Jefferson township and the devoted wife and mother 
has passed to the life eternal. Mr. and Mrs. Gladieux have six children : 
Ruth is the wife of Eugene Martin, of Indianapolis, and they have two 
children — Thelma and Ronald; Lottie is the wife of Nicholas Martin, of 
Fort Wayne ; and Pearl, Aldine, Gladys and Lillian remain at the parental 
home. 

Francis Gladieux. — The character and achievement of the late Fran- 
cis Gladieux marked him as one of the honored and influential citizens 
of Allen county and he was one of the county 's oldest and most successful 
farmers at the time of his death, which occurred October 17, 1916, at 
his fine rural home in Jefferson township. That he held inviolable place 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 219 

in popular esteem needs no further voucher than the statement that 
he served three terms as county commissioner, 1874 to 1882, and that 
he represented Allen county in the lower house of the Indiana legislature. 
Mr. Gladieux was born in Alsace, France, on October 8, 1837, and thus 
was seventy-nine years of age when he was summoned to the life eternal. 
He was a lad of seven years when he accompanied his parents to America 
and the family home was established in Stark county, Ohio, whence 
removal was made to Allen county, Indiana, in 1853. The subject of 
this memoir thus gained experience in connection with the pioneer period 
in the history of this county and he passed the remainder of his long 
and useful life in Jefferson township, where he became one of the leading 
exponents of agricultural industry and where he achieved a high degree 
of material prosperity. In 1860 he wedded Miss Mary Lamont, who 
proved his devoted companion and helpmeet, and they celebrated their 
golden wedding anniversary in 1910, the event having been one of notable 
order in the annals of Jefferson township. Mrs. Gladieux still survives 
the husband of her youth, as do also six of their nine children — Louis, 
Frank, Amiel C, Edward and Mesdames Emmett Ternet and Louis Rous- 
sel. He is survived also by thirty grandchildren and three great-grand- 
children. He was a devoted communicant of St. Louis' Catholic church 
at Besancon, as is also his venerable widow. A man of superabundant 
energy and fine mentality, Mr. Gladieux was well qualified for leadership 
in popular sentiment and action, and he was long one of the influential 
representatives of the Democratic party in Allen county. In addition 
to his effective service in the legislature and as a member of the board 
of county commissioners he was for twelve years trustee of Jefferson 
township and for four years township assessor. He had resided on his 
old homestead farm for the long period of fifty-six years and was the 
owner of some of the largest and best improved farms along the Lincoln 
highway, in which connection it should be observed that he was one 
of the first men to advocate and further the construction of good roads 
in the eastern part of the county. He lived a godly and righteous life 
and now that he rests from his labors his name is held in endearing 
veneration in the county that so long represented his home and was the 
stage of his successful endeavors as one of the world's constructive 
workers. 

Frank P. Glazier, attorney-at-law and abstractor in Fort Wayne, was 
born at Mexico, Miami county, Indiana, January 2, 1867. His parents 
were Harlow and Eliza (Chapman) Glazier. After receiving his education 
in the public schools of his native place and at Wabash, Indiana, he began 
his active course in business as an employe in the factories of Mexico and 
Wabash, to the latter of which the family moved in 1882. Having quali- 
fied himself for the duties of deputy recorder of the county, he was ap- 
pointed to that place in 1900 and filled it satisfactorily for four years. 
In 1905 he came to Fort Wayne and became associated with the Dreibel- 
biss Abstract Company, where he has remained until the present time. 
Mr. Glazier has made a study of law as it relates to real estate and has 
been admitted to the bar of Allen county, his practice being confined to 
the branch of law in which he has specialized. He was married June 30, 
1908, to Elizabeth T., daughter of Francis and Marion (Stirling) Burgess. 
They are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Glazier is a member 
of the Masonic and I. 0. 0. F. fraternities, in the former of which he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 



220 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

C. M. Glock, M. D. — The village of Areola is favored in claiming as 
one of its most progressive and public-spirited citizens the able and repre- 
sentative physician whose name introduces this paragraph and who is 
signally dignifying the profession in which his honored father gained 
precedence and distinction in Allen county. Dr. Glock not only controls 
a substantial practice as a physician and surgeon but is also prominent 
in connection with business affairs in his home village, where he is presi- 
dent of the Areola State Bank, in the organization of which he assisted, 
in 1912, and in the development of the business of which he has wielded 
much influence, espeeialh' through his inviolable place in popular confi- 
dence and esteem. Dr. Glock was born at Cedarville, Cedar Creek town- 
ship, this county, in the year 1876, the youngest in a family of four 
children, his mother having died within a few months after his birth. 
The other three children are Laurinda, Josephine and Otto. The Doctor 
is a son of Dr. Frederick Glock and Margaret (Watkins) Glock, the for- 
mer of whom was born in "Wells county, Indiana, and the latter in the 
ancient fortified city of Hyderbad, India, her parents having been Chris- 
tian missionaries in the Orient. Dr. Frederick Glock completed a thor- 
ough course in the Miami Medical College, at Cincinnati, Ohio, in which 
he was graduated as a member of the class of 1868. Thereafter he 
continued in the active and successful practice of his profession, as one 
of the leading and honored physicians of Allen county, until the close of 
his life. In the earlier period of his professional service he resided at 
Cedarville, but later engaged in practice in the city of Fort Wayne, where 
his death occurred, October 25, 1886, his wife having passed away in 1877. 
Dr. C. M. Glock was an infant at the time of his mother's death and was 
only ten years of age when his father likewise passed from the stage of 
life's mortal endeavors. He was afforded the advantages of the excellent 
public schools of Allen county and thereafter completed a course in phar- 
macy at Purdue University, in the city of Lafayette. His experience as a 
pharmacist quickened his ambition for the discipline that would open to 
him a wider and more beneficent field of endeavor, and he finally entered 
the Fort Wayne Medical College, in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1903 and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. There- 
after he gained valuable experience by serving eighteen months as an 
interne in the Indiana state school for feeble-minded children, at Fort 
Wayne, and then established his residence at Areola, where his ability, 
earnest ministrations and personal popularity have conspired to develop 
for him a large and representative general practice. He is a liberal and 
progressive citizen and in politics gives unswerving allegiance to the 
Dem6cratic party. In 1903 the Doctor wedded Miss Goldie Tilbury, vrho 
was born and reared in this county, as were also her parents, Scott and 
Dora (Parker) Tilbury, members of old and honored families of the 
county. Dr. and Mrs. Glock have one child — Margaret. 

George Goeglein. — Fifty years of continuous and honored identifica- 
tion with the affairs of his community place George Goeglein indisputably 
among the foremost men of St. Joseph to"uniship. Representative of the 
finest type of Allen county pioneers, he has spent his life thus far in 
the conduct and operation of a general merchandise business, with some 
attention to farming in later years. He has been a leader in his home 
town through half a century of development, aud much credit is due 
to him for his worthy efforts and accomplishments in his community. He 
has served in local offices on numerous occasions and was one of the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 221 

organizers of the German Lutheran church of which he is a member, 
while other enterprises pertinent to the well-being of his community have 
never lacked his patronage and encouragement. He has, in short, been 
a leader in his township, and has enjoyed the confidence and honest 
esteem of his fellow citizens through all the years of his activities among 
them. Mr. Goeglein is a native Ohioan, born in Meigs county, June 21, 
1840, a son of Daniel and Magdalene (Ryder) Goeglein, both natives of 
Oppenheim-on-the-Rhine, in Germany. They came to Ohio in the spring- 
time of 1838 and there, in Henry county, settled down to farm life, where 
they spent the remainder of their active careers. In later life they moved 
to St. Joseph township, in Allen county, Indiana, and took up their resi- 
dence in the home of their son, George, the subject of this review, where 
they sjjent their declining years. George was the youngest of their seven 
children, the others being Elizabeth, Margaret, Katherine, Jacob, John 
and Philip, all deceased. George Goeglein had his schooling in the com- 
mon schools of Meigs county, Ohio, and was twenty-five years of age 
when he came to Allen county and began an independent career. He 
thought he was destined for farm life and accordingly rented a farm 
and started a crop, but fortune had other plans for him, it seemed, for a 
long illness prevented him from giving his farm any attention after the 
crop was put in the ground, in consequence of which he was not especially 
busy at harvest time. He then turned his attention to the general mer- 
chandise business and started a general store in what has in later years 
come to be known as Goeglein. He began in a small way, carrying a 
general stock, and for the past fifty years has continued in that business 
in his community, realizing no small measure of prosperity, and in his 
position as merchant in the village coming to have an intimacy and under- 
standing with his fellows denied to many another in the community. 
Mr. Goeglein never quite relinquished his ambition to become a farmer 
and in later years acquired a farm, which he has developed to a splendid 
degree, so that it is one of the finest farms in the community, though its 
acreage is not large. Mr. Goeglein, however, has emphasized a truth 
that many another successful farmer has demonstrated — that sixty-five 
acres, properly managed, is a more creditable possession than sixty-five 
acres farmed in a slip-shod manner. Modern buildings mark the place 
as the property of a successful farmer, and the fences are most creditable. 
The place is tiled and in every way brought up to the highest agricul- 
tural standards of a successful farming country. Mr. Goeglein married 
Katie Savage, a daughter of Conrad and Mary Savage, both native-born 
Germans and early settlers in the state of Ohio. The father died in 
Ohio and Mrs. Savage passed her declining years in the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Goeglein. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Goeglein, and they reared two adopted daughters as well. The children, 
named in order of their birth, are : John, George A., Valentine C, Wil- 
liam G., Gottlieb, Frederick, Theodore, Katie, and Sophia. The adopted 
daughters are Kate and Carrie. Add to this goodly family his own par- 
ents and those of his wife, and it will be seen that Mr. Goeglein was a 
man who enjoyed family life and welcomed such responsibilities of a 
doniestic nature as came his way. Mr. Goeglein is a Democrat in politics, 
active in a local way, but not a participant in the more far-reaching 
activities of his party. 

John J. Goldsmith, the efficient and popular young proprietor of the 
Hoosier Garage, at Harlan, Springfield township, was born in Cedar Creek 



222 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

township, this county, March 30, 1890, a son of Christopher C. and Lydia 
(Zimmerman) Goldsmith. Christopher C. Goldsmith was born in Hart- 
ford township, Adams county, Indiana, June 10, 1856, a son of Jacob 
and Susanna (Egly) Goldsmith, both of whom were born in Germany 
and came to America when young. They became the parents of ten 
children, namely: Joseph, Henry, Susanna, Jacob, Katherine, Lena, 
Christopher C, Amos, Rachel and one who died in infancy. Jacob, Kath- 
erine and Amos are now deceased. Jacob Goldsmith learned in his 
youth the carpenter's trade, to which he devoted his attention for several 
years. He then engaged in farming in Butler county, Ohio, whence he 
finally came to Indiana and established himself as a farmer in Adams 
county. He later came with his family to Allen county, where he con- 
tinued his association with agricultural industry and where both he and 
his wife passed the remainder of their lives, both having been earnest 
members of the Mennonite church. Christopher C. Goldsmith gained his 
early education in the common schools of Adams and Allen counties and 
eventually became one of the substantial and representative farmers of 
Cedar Creek township, where he continued his active allegiance to the 
basic industry of agriculture until 1904, when he sold his farm and be- 
came essentially the first settler in the village of Grabill, Springfield 
township, where he engaged in the hardware business, his store having 
been the first building erected in the village. Three years later he re- 
moved to Harlan, where he engaged in the same line of business, a stock 
of general merchandise having been added four years later, and he was 
associated with John H. Zimmerman in the conducting of a substantial 
and prosperous hardware and general merchandise business under the firm 
name of J. H. Zimmerman & Co. He is a stalwart supporter of the cause 
of the Republican party and both he and his wife are active members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. They became the parents of five chil- 
dren — John J., David L., Frank, Benjamin and Rose — and of the number 
David and Benjamin are deceased. In February, 1889, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Goldsmith to Miss Lydia Zimmerman, who was born 
in Tippecanoe county, this state, a daughter of John and Lena (Slagel) 
Zimmerman, who were born and reared in Germany, where their mar- 
riage was solemnized. Upon coming to America they first settled in Mis- 
souri, whence they later came to Indiana and located in Tippecanoe 
county, where they passed the remainder of their lives, Mr. Zimmerman 
having there become a substantial farmer. They had the following chil- 
dren — Josephine, Nicholas, Lena, Marj^, Joseph, Kate, John, Lydia, Rose, 
Elizabeth, Leah, Benjamin and Sarah. John J. Goldsmith continued his 
studies in the public schools until he had profited by the advantages of 
the Harlan High School, and thereafter completed a three months' course 
in the commercial department of Valparaiso University. In 1909 he 
assumed the position of bookkeeper in the bank at Grabill, and after 
serving in this capacity one year and eight months he removed to Harlan 
and assumed the responsible office of cashier of the Harlan State Bank, 
in which position he served from 1911 until January 1, 1917, and in which 
he did much to further the upbuilding of this substantial financial insti- 
tution. The Hoosier Garage, at Harlan, to which he now devotes his 
attention, is a modern garage building of cement-block construction, the 
same having been erected by him in the autumn of 1916. Mr. Goldsmith 
is one of the loyal and progressive young men of Harlan, is influential 
in community affairs, is a Democrat in his political adherency, and holds 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 223 

membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. On November 27, 1913, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Goldsmith to Miss Joy M. Shutt, who 
was born and reared in DeKalb county, Indiana, a daughter of William 
and Francis (Houck) Shutt, who were born in DeKalb county, this state, 
and both of whom are now deceased. 

Joseph Grabill may be said to be the father of the little town that 
bears his name, for it was he who laid it out, in 1901, a part of his home 
place being in the original townsite. Mr. Grabill organized the bank 
and in other ways played a prominent part in making a prosperous village 
of the new community. He was born in Springfield township on January 
16, 1886, sou of Joseph and Magdalene (Gerig) Grabill, both of them 
natives of Germany who came to America after their marriage and 
settled in Allen county, almost immediately thereafter. They had seven 
sons and daughters. David is a resident of Grabill. Joseph was the 
second child. Anna married Jacob Conrad. Lydia is the wife of Peter 
Amstutz. Jacob lives in Springfield, Indiana. Noah is a Grabill resident 
and Samuel is located in Berne, Indiana. Joseph Grabill has been de- 
voted to farm life to a considerable extent and has been very successful 
in that enterprise, as well as along other lines to which he has given hy 
attention. He has a fine home in the community and is identified with 
some of the leading industrial and financial enterprises in the village, be- 
ing a stockholder and director in the Grabill Bank and tfie Grabill Grain 
Company. His connection with the organization of the town in the earlier 
days has already been touched upon. Mr. Grabill was married first to 
Miss Emma Sanders, daughter of Christ Sanders, and one daughter, Lily, 
was born of this union, and she is the wife of Noah Roth, of Grabill. Mr. 
Grabill was married, second, on March 28, 1897, to Miss Katherine Naf- 
cigger, born in Henry county, Ohio. She died on September 8, 1911, 
the mother of three children — Priscilla, Wilma May and Clifford Louis — 
all of whom are at home. Mrs. Grabill was a devoted wife and mother 
and her passing was a great loss to the entire community as well as to 
the family she left. Mr. Grabill and his children have membership in 
the Grabill Mission church and he is a member of its board of directors. 

Jeremiah B. Grabner conducts a prosperous general merchandise 
business in the village of Edgerton, Jackson township, and is serving 
also as trustee of the township, a fact that denotes unequivocally the 
high regard in which he is held in the community that has ever rep- 
resented his home. He was born in this township on July 10, 1872, son 
of Peter N. and Louisa (Hurtle) Grabner, both of whom were born in 
Germany, whence they came with their parents to the United States 
when they were young. Settlement was first made in the state of Ohio, 
and Peter N. Grabner was a youth when he came to Allen county and 
established his home in Fort AYayne. For more than a quarter of a 
century he served as a locomotive engineer in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company, and after retiring from this position established 
his home on a farm in Jackson township, where both he and his wife 
passed the remainder of their lives — sterling citizens wdio commanded 
the high regard of all who knew them. Of their eleven children the first 
born, Emma, is deceased; Henry is engaged in the successful practice of 
law in Fort Wayne, as one of the representative members of the Allen 
county bar ; Jacob and John are deceased ; Mrs. Louise Rood is the next 
in order of birth ; Mrs. Susan Shiftman is a resident of the state of Okla- 
homa; Samuel is the next; Jeremiah B. is the immediate subject of this 



224 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

sketch; Albert and Adeline are deceased; and Mrs. Minnie Smith is 
the youngest. Jeremiah B. Grabner acquired his early education in the 
schools of Jackson township and continued to be associated in the work 
and management of the home farm until he was twenty-four years of 
age, when he established his present mercantile business at Edgerton, the 
same having been made a prosperous enterprise under his effective man- 
agement. He is a stalwart in the local camp of the Democratic party, 
has been influential in public affairs of a local order, and in November, 
1914, was elected trustee of Jackson to\Tiiship, for a term of four years. 
He had previously served nine years as township assessor and two years 
as constable. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and with the Improved Order of Red Men. February 6, 1902, recorded 
the marriage of Mr. Grabner to ]\Iiss Jennie Stolder, daughter of Peter 
and Mary (Voroil) Stolder, both of whom were residents of Jackson 
township at the time of their death and were children when the respec- 
tive families established homes in Allen county. I\Ir. Stolder was born 
in Switzerland and his wife was a native of France. They are survived 
by five children — Julian, Louis, Mrs. Louisa Spieth, Mrs. Jennie Grabner, 
and Justine. Mr. and Mrs. Grabner have six children, all of whom re- 
main at the parental home — Edith, Carl, Ethel, Ruth, Daniel and Oliver. 
Fred Graeber came from his German fatherland to America when 
he was a young man of about twenty-seven years, and after landing in 
New York city, in 1898, he came forthwith to Allen county, where he 
joined his brother William, who had established a home in Port Wayne 
in the year 1882. He whose name introduces this sketch had the energy, 
ambition and resourcefulness that make for worthy achievement and 
definite success, and he has become known and honored as one of the 
progressive farmers and stock-growers of Maumee township, where he 
owns a well improved farm of one hundred and fifty-three acres, besides 
an additional tract of eighty acres in Milan township. On this extensive 
landed estate he is bringing forth the best results in both agricultural 
and live-stock enterprise, and he is giving special atention to the raising 
of fine Belgian horses, in connection with which department of enterprise 
he owns a Belgian stallion of the best type. He has identified himself 
most fully and loyally with community affairs and is deeply appreciative 
of the institutions and advantages of the land of his adoption. His 
political support is given to the cause of the Republican party and he 
and his wife are zealous communicants of the Lutheran church. Fred 
Graeber is the younger in a family of five children, and the eldest of 
the number is William, who came to Allen county in 1882, as noted 
above ; Louisa and Henrietta remain in Germany ; and Henry is deceased. 
Mr. Graeber was born in Dilingen, Germany, on February 25, 1871, and 
is a son of William and Romina (Hocker) Graeber, who passed their 
entire lives in that section of the great German empire, the father having 
been a farmer by vocation. Mr. Graeber has made the best of improve- 
ments on his farm property and in his varied operations represents the 
most progressive methods and policies involved in twentieth-century agri- 
eulturism and stock-raising. On April 12, 1899, was solemnized his 
marriage to Miss Romina Bohnke, who is a daughter of Fred and Wil- 
helmina (Logaeman) Bohnke, who were born in Germany and whose 
marriage was solemnized in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1891 they 
came to Allen county, but they later removed to Adams county, where 
Mr. Bohnke passed the remainder of his life and where his widow stiU 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 225 

maintains her home. Mr. and Mrs. Graeber have four children — Herman, 
Alvina, Luetta, and Minnie — and the pleasant family home is known 
for its generous hospitality and good cheer. 

Philip Graf. — The late Philip Graf was for many years engaged in 
the grocery business in Fort Wayne, and was still occupied in that 
enterprise when death claimed him on September 11, 1910. He was a 
prosperous and prominent man in the city and was a dependable citizen 
and a credit to the community as long as he lived. He reared a fine 
family of sons and daughters who are filling places of usefulness wherever 
they are found, and viewed from the standpoint of worth, his career 
in Fort Wayne was a highly successful one. Mr. Graf was born in 
Ohio on September 8, 1854, and he died when in the prime of life. He 
was the son of John and Barbara (Ranning) Graf, both of them born and 
reared in Germany, and John Graf came to Fort Wayne to settle when 
Philip was a lad of three years. The father was in the employ of the 
Pennsylvania road from that time until the end of his life. Six children 
were born to him and his wife, but not one of the number is living today. 
The first independent work Philip Graf carried on was in a trunk factory 
on Columbia street in Fort Wayne, and he was there seven years. His 
next venture was in the grocery business. He had saved something 
from his seven years of labor in the factory and invested it in a small 
grocery store at 1813 Lafayette street. Some time later he erected a 
more roomy store on the site, and he carried on a thriving grocery busi- 
ness there up to the time of his death. The place is still carried on 
under the name of the Graf Grocery. After his marriage Mr. Graf built- 
a fine home at 1930 Lafayette street, and his widow is living there today. 
Mr. Graf was married on May 13, 1879, to Miss Sophia Wessel, who 
was born in Michigan and came to Fort Wayne with her parents when 
she was about two years old. The Wessels are still living in Fort Wayne, 
and have lately celebrated their sixty-first wedding anniversary. Mr. 
Wessel was a stationary engineer for many years, and has been retired 
from the service for some time. He and his wife, who was before her 
marriage Elizabeth Keintz, have traveled extensively in this country and 
Europe, having crossed the Atlantic ocean fifteen times. He is now 
eighty-four and his wife seventy-eight years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Graf 
were born eleven children. They were named Philip, Elizabeth, Anna, 
Florence, Joseph, Philip, Marie, Laurette, Gertrude, Gerald and Charles. 
The first five named are dead, as are also the two youngest — Gertrude and 
Gerald. Philip Junior was named in honor of his father and is now em- 
ployed by the Armour Packing Company at Chicago as a mechanical engi- 
neer. Marie, the seventh child, is the wife of Amiel Bail of Fort Wayne, 
and Laurette is married to Joseph Lill, of St. Louis, Missouri. Mr. Graf 
was a Democrat all his life and a Catholic, with membership in St. Peter's 
church, in Fort Wayne, which he helped to build and which he always sup- 
ported most generously. He was a member of its board of trustees at the 
time of his death. Fraternally, he had membership in the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and was one of the most popular members of 
that organization. He died while he might be said to be in the very 
prime of his life, and his passing was mourned by many who knew him 
for an honest gentleman, a good citizen and a staunch friend. 

Frank C. GrafFe is one of the progressive and dependable men of the 
younger set in Fort Wayne, his native city. He has been in the employ 
of the General Electric Works, since 1903, as a movement maker on 



226 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

watches and later was advanced to the post of supervisor of stock and 
materials entering into the make-up of the product of his department. 
Mr. Graffe was born on February 15, 1880, son of George and Mary 
Elizabeth (Boone) Graffe, the father a native New Yorker and the mother 
born in Wayne township, Allen county, Indiana. George Graffe, how- 
ever, came to Fort Wayne as an infant in arms and spent his mature 
years in the hardware business. He was a tinner by trade, and his 
knowledge of that -^ork fitted admirably into his later activities as a 
dealer in hardware in Fort Wayne. He died in his home city and his 
widow still survives. Seven children were born to them ; Rose is the 
wife of Frank A. Willis, of Jersey City, New Jersey ; Clara is the widow 
of John V. Kessell of Fort Wayne ; Julian B. is located in Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma. Two daughters, Daisy and Amelia, have shed lustre on the 
family name by their vocations in the church, both being Sisters of 
Providence in Chicago. The sixth child was Frank C .and the youngest 
is Henry J., of Fort Wayne. Frank Graffe had his education in Cathedral 
Parochial school and engaged in the jewelry business with his uncle 
when he left his studies. Later, he went to Princeton, Indiana, and was 
there employed in the Princeton Clock Works for two years, finishing 
his training in the business, after which he accepted a position as man- 
ager of a jewelry establishment in Brooklyn, New York, where he de- 
mained for a year and a half. Returning to Fort Wayne for a brief 
period, he was offered a position in Logansport with J. E. Taylor, where 
he was engaged until 1903, when he returned once more to his home city 
and there became identified with the General Electric Works as has al- 
ready been stated. In 1903 Mr. Graffe was married in Logansport to Miss 
Laura M. Tucker, who was born and reared in that place. Their marriage 
took place on February 24. IMr. and Mrs. Graffe adopted two boys — 
Stephen and Raymond — and the latter met his death in an automobile 
accident on October 2, 1915. Mr. Graffe is a Democrat in politics, a 
member of the Roman Catholic church and the Knights of Columbus. 

Samuel Wilson Greenland, general manager of the Fort Wayne and 
Northern Indiana Traction Company since 1911, is conceded to be one 
of the rising young men in his particular field. He has already filled 
a number of positions of some importance and he came to the present 
company as purchasing agent, bearing recommendations of the most 
pleasing character. Mr. Greenland is a native of Pennsylvania, born in 
Clarion, that state, on April 27, 1879, and he is the son of Walter W. 
and Sadie E. (Wilson) Greenland. Both were of Pennsylvania families, 
the father being born in Huntington county and the mother in Clarion 
county. Walter W. Greenland was engaged in the lumber and oil busi- 
ness all his life. He died in 1894, and his widow survives him, living at 
present in Clarion, Pennsylvania. Five children came to them as follows : 
Bird W., now deceased ; Walter Jr., of Moberly, Missouri, there con- 
nected with the Wabash railroad ; Elizabeth, the wife of W. S. Stephen- 
son, of Roanoke, Virginia ; Samuel Wilson of this review, and J. Allen, 
who is general freight and passenger agent for the Fort Wayne and 
Northern Indiana Traction Company, of which the subject is general 
manager. As a growing boy at home, Mr. Greenland attended the public 
schools of Clarion. He later attended Pennsylvania Military College at 
Chester, Pennsylvania, and he had his technical training in Pennsylvania 
State College. He completed a course in electrical engineering there, 
after which he engaged for a short time in the lumber business in Pitts- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 227 

burgh. He was next associated with the Bell Telephone Company, being 
located first at Pittsburgh, then at Wheeling and still later in eastern 
Ohio. In 1905 he was associated with Robert W. Watson at Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, in electric railway engineering, and in 1907 he went to 
Columbus, Mississippi, as general manager of the Columbus Railway 
Light and Power Company, and in 1911 was called to Fort Wayne to 
accept the position of purchasing agent for the Fort Wayne and Northern 
Indiana Traction Company. His appointment to the office of general 
manager followed soon after, and he is occupying that position at this 
time. Mr. Greenland was married September 14, 1909, to Miss Mary Eliza- 
beth Fox, of Bridgeport, Ohio, where she was born and reared. They 
have three children — Samuel Wilson, Jr., Sarah Elizabeth and Mary Fox. 
Mr. Greenland is a thirty-second degree Mason, with Knight Templar 
and Shriner affiliations, and is also a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He and his wife have membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church and have an active part in the good works 
of that body. 

Frank Greenwell, M. D., is to be be designated not only as one of the 
leading physicians and surgeons of his native county, -where he has been 
established in the practice of his profession for the past forty years, but 
he has also been a signally prominent and influential figure in public 
affairs in the county, his maximum political preferment having come 
when he was elected a member of the senate of the Indiana legislature. 
His broad mental grasp and indomitable energy have found effective play 
in his support of measures and enterprises tending to advance the civic 
and industrial progress and prosperity of his native county, and his 
capacity for the giving of active service in varied lines has demonstrated 
his versatility and his civic loyalty, and that without impairing in the 
least lii;? allegiance to the profession in which he has achieved prestige 
and unequivocal success. Dr. Greenwell was born in Perry township, this 
county, April 8, 1851, a son of George and Elizabeth (Blickenstaff) Green- 
well, both natives of the state of Maryland. The father was left an 
orphan when about ten years of age, and prior to coming to Indiana had 
lived for a number of years in Ohio, where his elder children were born. 
About the year 1848 he became one of the pioneers of Allen county, -where 
he obtained a tract of land and instituted the development of a farm 
from a virtual wilderness. He continued as one of the substantial ex- 
ponents of agricultural industry in this county until his death, at the age 
of seventy-two years, and his name merits high place on the roll of those 
sterling pioneers who contributed generously to civic and industrial de- 
velopment and progress in this now favored section of the Hoosier State. 
His political su{)port was given to the Democratic party. His wife was 
fifty-eight years of age at the time of her death. Of their five children 
two died in early childhood, and the other three still survive, the two 
brothers of Dr. Greenwell being Christian L. and George W., both of 
whom are representative farmers in Allen county. Dr. Greenwell passed 
the period of his childhood and early youth on the old home farm and 
after profiting duly by the advantages afforded in the public schools of 
the locality and period pursued a higher academic course in the Method- 
ist College at Fort Wayne. In consonance with his ambition and well 
formulated plans, he then entered the medical department of historic 
old Western Reserve University, in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, and in 
this institution was graduated as a member of the class of 1876 and with 



228 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In that same Centennial year he 
established his residence at Huntertown, Allen county, where he has 
since continued in the active general practice of his profession and has 
served long, faithfully and effectively in the alleviation of human suffer- 
ing and distress, his practice having extended over a wide section of 
country normally tributary to Huntertown. He has kept in close touch 
with the advances made in medical and surigal science and still gives 
much time to the study of the best standard and periodical literature of 
his profession, besides maintaining affiliation with the Allen County 
Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. In the midst of the many exactions of his profes- 
sional service the Doctor has found time and opportunity to exert potent 
influence in community affairs of a public order and has been a leader 
in the local camp of the Democratic party. He served two years as 
county councilman at large, and in 1910 was elected representative of his 
district in the state senate, in which he served the regular term of four 
years and was an influential figure in the legislative sessions of 1911 and 
1913. In the senate he was the staunch advocate of much constructive 
and progressive legislation. He was the author of the present Indiana 
law governing cold-storage institutions and business and championed 
this bill with characteristic energy and effectiveness, besides which he 
framed the Indiana park law, the enactment of which has met with rep- 
resentative popular endorsement. The Indiana cold-storage law has 
been the pattern on which many other states have formed similar legis- 
lative enactments. Dr. Greenwell was one of the organizers and in- 
corporators of the Huntertown State Bank, in 1913 ; was its first presid- 
ent and served in this executive office two years. He was re-elected for a 
third term but felt constrained to retire from the position, owing to the 
exigent demands placed upon him in the work of his profession, the 
claims of which he has never subordinated to any other interests. In 
1910 he was concerned in the organization of the Huntertown Grain 
Company, and has served consecutively as president of this corporation 
except during one year when he was able to prevail upon his associates 
to release him from the responsibilities involved. The Doctor is at the 
present time president also of the Huntertown Live Stock Association, 
which was organized August 2, 1916, and there have been few matters 
of importance in his home community that have not enlisted his attention 
and felt his benignant and loyal influence. On May 26, 1876, the year 
that marked his reception of the degree of Doctor of Medicine, was 
solemnized the marriage of Dr. Greenwell to Miss Mary Jane Hunter, 
who was born and reared in this county and is a daughter of the late 
"William T. Hunter, of Huntertown, a village that was named in honor 
of this representative pioneer family. Dr. and Mrs. Greenwell became 
the parents of two children, of -whom one is living, Eloise, who is the wife 
of Henry Nelson, their home being at Huntertown and Mr. Nelson having 
come to Indiana from Windsor, Massachusetts, a suburb of the city of 
Boston. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have one child, Mary Elizabeth. In years 
of continuous practice Dr. Greenwell may consistently be termed the 
dean of his profession in his native county, even as he is known and hon- 
ored as a representative citizen. 

Charles E. Greer is one of the progressive young business men of 
Port Wayne, where he has through his own ability and well ordered ef- 
forts achieved definite success and a position of influence in local business 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 229 

enterprise, this fact being assured when it is stated that he is now vice- 
president of the Seavey Hardware Company, one of the leading wholesale 
and retail concerns in this line of retail trade in the metropolis of his 
native county. Mr. Greer was born in Fort Wayne on September 24, 
1874 and attended the public schools of Fort Wayne until he was four- 
teen years of age, when he found employment in the local factory in 
which at that time wagon and carriage spokes were manufactured ; 
and a few years later he entered the employ of the Seavey Hardware 
Company, in the year 1892. He began his service in the po.sition of order 
clerk, later was a salesman in the retail department, next assumed the 
position of receiving clerk, later served as stock clerk and as represen- 
tative of the house as a traveling salesman. His course has been marked 
by well earned advancement and he has been indefatigable in his work, 
careful in informing himself thoroughly in all details of the business 
and full of energy and progressiveness. He finally became buyer for the 
concern and, since 19] 4, has been vice-president of the Seavey Hardware 
Company, with established vantage place as one of the representative 
business men and loyal and valued citizens of Fort Wayne. Mr. Greer 
has had no desire to enter the arena of practical politics but is thoroughly 
public-spirited and takes deep interest in all things pertaining to the 
welfare of his native city and county. 

Chester Greer. — Fifty-four years of continuous residence in Lafayette 
township and vicinity have established Chester Greer firmly in his com- 
munity, where he has been conspicuously identified with the agriculture 
and business interests of the district since he first identified himself 
with life as an independent factor. He has been prosperous, and is 
today connected with various moneyed interests, aside from his farming 
activities, and he has been associated with the civic life of his township 
in useful and important capacities. He was born in Pleasant township 
on February 16, 1863, the son of Thomas and Sarah (Shives) Greer, who 
were born in Carroll county, Indiana, in the vicinity of Delphi. The 
paternal grandfather of the subject was a native son of Ireland, who came 
to America in boyhood, settling in 1841 and identifying the family name 
with the fortunes of Pleasant township in 1842. He was Thomas Greer, and 
he was truly a pioneer in the community wherein he ended his days. He 
helped to lay out Pleasant township, and the first township election was 
held at his home. He was a Democrat, always active in politics, and was a 
leader in his community as long as he lived. When he first located in 
Pleasant township he bought eighty acres of canal land and there built a 
home for his family. He died July 4, 1910, and his wife passed away Oc- 
tober 29, 1902. Thomas Greer following in the useful career his father had 
begun and took his place as a prominent and dependable man in the com- 
munity. He was also active in local politics and served first as township 
assessor for four years and later as county assessor for a similar period. 
He devoted his agricultural activities mainly to stock-farming, and was 
very successful in that work. He was a member of the Presbyterian church 
and was high in Masonry, both he and his father having attained to 
the thirty-second degree of that order. In later life Thomas Greer lived 
retired from active farm life, and he died July 7, 1910. To him and_ his 
wife twelve sons and daughters were born. John, the first born, is a 
member of the Fort Wayne police force. Sarah J. is the wife of William 
Gray, of Ohio. Chester is the subject of this family review. Mary died 
in infancy. William is a resident of Salt Lake City. Thomas lives in 



230 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Fort "Wayne. Ellen, George, Joseph and Charles are deceased. Clara 
is a graduate nurse in Fort Wayne. Cora married Ray Keyser of Lafay- 
ette township. Chester Greer was brought up on his father's farm and 
had the usual farm training. His education was limited to the schools of 
his community, and when he reached manhood he rented a farm and 
turned his attention to the business of gaining material independence 
along the lines for which his training best fitted him. He rented a farm 
for six years and, in 1898, bought a place of eighty acres in Lafayette 
township, where he has since made his home. He has made much progress 
in the years of his residence there and his success in stock-farming is an 
accepted fact wherever he is known. He is a Democrat and was town- 
ship assessor of Lafayette township for ten years. He has long had 
membership in the Christian church and his fraternal connections are 
with the Independent Order of Odd. Fellows and the Modern Woodmen, 
being a charter member of the latter order at Zanesville. Mr. Greer is a 
stockholder in the Uniondale Rural Telephone Company and for four 
years was treasurer of the company, while he has been a member of its 
board of directors for nine years. He was married on October 5, 1889, 
to Miss Sarah J. Earl, a daughter of Charles and Margaret (Cartwright) 
Earl, and to them have come six children. Margaret is the wife of 
Samuel G. Zirkle, of Marion township. Edith married William T. Mc- 
Allister, of Marion township. Nora is in training in Hope Hospital in 
Fort Wayne. Sarah Fern and Ruth are now attending the high school 
in Roanoke, and Naomi, the youngest, is at home with the parents. 

Julian C. Gremaux. — One of the capable and progressive young 
farmers of Jefferson township and a native son of his community is 
Julian C. Gremaux, trustee of his township and a citizen of much merit. 
He was born in Jefferson township on August 31, 1885, son of Arsene and 
Melinda (Reuille) Gremaux, both of French birth and ancestry. They 
came to America as children, the mother being only four years old when 
she was transplanted with her family from their native France to 
American soil. The parents after marriage settled in Jefferson town- 
ship and are living there at the present time. They were ambitious peo- 
ple and succeeded in establishing a home in their new country, their suc- 
cesses enabling them to educate their children in some degree and to help 
them to become established in life. They reared a fine family of eight 
children, all living at this writing, and named as follows: Francis E., 
Mary, Adeline, Annie, Alice, Julian C, Lois and Clem. Annie and Alice, 
it should be stated, are twins. Julian C. Gremaux was educated in the 
schools of Jefferson township and at a business college in Fort Wayne. 
After completing his studies he turned his attention to the business of 
farming, settling on a farm in Section 24, where he is still living and 
enjoying a very satisfactory and well merited success. General farming 
and stock raising occupy him, and he has taken his place among the 
foremost farming men of his community in the brief period in which he 
has been identified with the work as an independent operator. October 6, 
1914, Mr. Gremaux was married to Miss Eleanor Voirol, daughter of Louis 
and Mary (Bardy) Voirol, Jackson township people, still resident there, 
and two children have been born to them — Veronica and Eleanor. The 
family are communicants of the Catholic church and Mr. Gremaux is a 
Democrat in politics. He is now serving in the office of trustee of Jefferson 
township, having been elected, in 1914, for a four year term. He has 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 231 

given a creditable service to his community in that office and takes his 
place among the representative and progressive men of the township. 

Euclid Eugene Griest. — The Griest family, of which Euclid Eugene 
Griest is a representative, dates its settlement in America back to a date 
prior to the coming of William Penn. John Griest was the first of the 
name to leave England. He was a Quaker, or Friend, and was driven 
out of his native land because of his religious belief. Like many another, 
he came to the new world as a seeker after religious freedom and found 
it in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he established a home and 
reared a family, worshipping God according to the dictates of his own 
conscience, without interference from any. All of the name in America 
today are said to be direct descendants of that brave pioneer. It is not 
clear just when the family made its first migration from Pennsyl- 
vania into the middle west, but in about 1820 we find the grandfather 
of the subject established in the state of Ohio. Later he moved to Iowa, 
and there he died when his son, A. P. Griest, father of the subject, was 
about fourteen years of age. Following the death of the father, the little 
family returned to Quaker City, Ohio, and the boy worked at odd jobs 
about the town for a few years. He was still in his teens when he made 
up his mind to better his condition somehow, and he did it by following 
a course of study in Duff's Business College in Pittsburgh. He completed 
a course of training in bookkeeping in three months, after which he held 
a position as instructor in the college for a few months. He then went 
to Baltimore, Maryland, there to accept a position with a commission 
house, and he was with that concern for two years, coming back at the 
end of that time to take a position as agent for the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad at their station in Quaker City, Ohio, his former home. From 
that time on Mr. Griest continued in the railroad service in one capacity 
or another. From his Quaker City office he was promoted to the post 
of agent at Shawnee, was later moved to Plymouth and still later to 
Zanesville, the latter station being then one of the largest stations on 
the B. & 0. By that time Mr. Griest had come to feel that he had 
reached the end of his advancement with the B. & 0., and he resigned 
from its service in 1887 to accept a position as clerk in the auditor's 
office of the Cleveland & Marietta Railway Company, at Cambridge, Ohio. 
About a year afterward he was appointed acting auditor, and a year 
later became auditor for the road, continuing in that office until January 
1, 1900, when that road was absorbed by the Pennsylvania system. At 
that time he was made auditor's traveling agent, in which capacity he 
served until January 1, 1903, when he was appointed to the position of 
auditor of the ore and coal freight receipts for the Pennsylvania Lines 
at Pittsburg. On January 1, 1917, he was appointed auditor of miscel- 
laneous accounts. He died January 15, 1917. On August 27, 1878, Mr. 
Griest was married to Miss Arabella Moore, like himself a native of 
Quaker City, Ohio, the marriage taking place in that community. Five 
children were born to them, Ethel and Kate are deceased. Milton Moore 
is sales manager for the Carnegie Coal Company at Pittsburg. Helen is 
the wife of H. T. Cook, manager of the order department of the American 
Sheet & Tin Plate Company, of Chicago. Euclid Eugene, the third born, 
is the immediate subject of this family review. He was born in Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, on November 28, 1882, and had his early education in the 
schools of Cambridge, Ohio, though his advantages in that early period 
were limited, for he dropped out of the high school during his first year 



232 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

and went to work in a department store. A suspicion that lie was not 
exactly suited to department store life led him to withdraw from that 
field, and he was seventeen years old when in June, 1899, he entered 
the employ of the Cleveland & Marietta Railroad Company as a clerk 
and messenger in the auditor's office. On January 1st following this 
office was transferred to Pittsburgh, and he entered the office of the 
division freight agent at Cambridge as clerk. A little later he served as 
a machinist's apprentice in the shops of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chi- 
cago & St. Louis, remaining there as apprentice and full fledged machinist 
until October 1, 1904. It should be remarked that during the last four 
months of his service as an apprentice Mr. Griest was assigned to special 
work under the master mechanic, in charge of the machinerj^, taking out 
the steam engines and installing motors in connection with the work of 
changing the shop from steam to electric drive. This work completed, 
he was assigned to re-arrange the piece work prices, and work in con- 
nection with the introduction of high speed steel and generally improving 
shop methods. Not content with his accomplishments thus far, young 
Griest resigned from the service and on October 1, 1904, entered the 
school of mechanical engineering at Purdue University. He was gradu- 
ated from that institution in June, 1907. On July following he entered 
upon the duties of designer for the Crucible Steel Company of America, 
with offices at Pittsburg, in which position he remained until November 1, 
1907, when he left the Crucible Steel people and entered the employ of 
the Erie Railroad as foreman of their machine shops at Hornell, New 
York. On February 1, 1908, Mr. Griest came to Fort Wayne as assistant 
machine shop foreman for the Pennsylvania Lines. A year later he was 
promoted to the office of assistant master mechanic, which position he 
held up to the time of his appointment to his present post as master 
mechanic, on January 1, 1915. It should be remarked here that the shops 
at Fort Wayne are the largest of the northwest system of the Pennsyl- 
vania Lines, employing about 2,300 men, and are among the principal 
shops of the entire system. Mr. Griest succeeded B. Fitzpatrick, under 
whom he had served as assistant master mechanic, and he was the logical 
successor to the post made vacant by the death of the veteran master. 
On September 8, 1909, Mr. Griest was married to Miss Marianna Lindley, 
the daughter of Charles W. Lindley, a retired farmer of Bloomingdale, 
Indiana. She was a graduate of Purdue University, also of the class of 
1907. They have one daughter — Miriam, born April 4, 1914. Mr. and 
Mrs. Griest are both representatives of old Quaker families and are 
themselves adherents of the faith, but as that denomination is not suf- 
ficiently numerous in Fort Wayne to warrant the maintenance of a 
church, they have united with the First Presbyterian church of Fort 
Wayne and are loyal and active members of that body. Mr. Griest is a 
Republican, but has manifested no political ambitions at any time. He 
is a Mason, well advanced, and in Fort Wayne has membership in the 
Commercial Club, the Country Club and the Rotary Club. He has shown 
himself genuinely interested in the aff'airs of the Young Men's Christian 
Association and served as a member of the central board of that organiza- 
tion, as well as having served as a trustee and as a member of the build- 
ing committee. In the fall of 1916 he was elected president of the Asso- 
ciation. In line with his work he is chairman of the executive committee 
of the International Railway General Foreman's Association. He is a 
director in the Citizens Trust Company and a director in the Fort Wayne 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 233 

Morris Plan Company. It may be said that Mr. Griest has been identified 
with railroad work to the exclusion of all other lines of endeavor since 
he was seventeen years old, though an exception of one brief period 
might be named. During his university career he spent one vacation 
season, from June 1 to October 1, 1906, in a trip to Alaska, where he 
was engaged in the investigation of mines and investment propositions, 
in the interests of the New York Development Company. In that period 
he made a brief but agreeable acquaintance with the Alaska and British 
Columbia districts. 

John E. Griflan is the owner of the fine old homestead farm on which 
he was born and reared and which is eligibly situated in Section 2, Perry 
township, and is not only a scion of one of the honored pioneer families 
of Allen county but has also proved conclusively that to him is not appli- 
cable the scriptural aphorism that "a prophet is not without honor save 
in his own country," for, while claiming no prophetic powers, he has 
secure place in popular confidence and esteem, as indicated by the fact 
that the year 1917 finds him the loyal and valued incumbent of the ofiice 
of township trustee of his native township. On his present homestead 
farm Mr. Griffin was born, November 14, 1870, a son of Alanson C. and 
Henrietta (Surf us) Griffin. His father, who is now one of the venerable 
and honored pioneer citizens of Allen county, was born in Union county, 
New York, June 29, 1836, and still resides in Perry township, to the 
development and progress of which section of the country he has contrib- 
uted his full quota. His wife was born and reared in Perry township 
and here passed her entire life, her parents having been numbered among 
the early pioneers of the county. She was born in 1844 and was called 
to the life eternal in 1876, her lineage having traced back to German 
origin. The original American representatives of the Griffin family came 
from England and the paternal grandfather of the subject of this review 
was a successful carpenter and contractor in Union county. New York. 
His son, Alanson C, likewise learned the carpenter's trade, but the major 
part of his active career was marked by close and successful association 
with agricultural industry, of which he became a leading exponent in 
Allen county. John E. Griffin was the fourth in a family of six children, 
all of whom are living. John E. Griffin was reared to the sturdy discipline 
of the farm and acquired his early education in the schools of Perry 
township. He continued thereafter to assist his father in the manage- 
ment and work of the farm until 1895, when he assumed control of its 
operation. Later he purchased the place, which is well improved, and 
has proved himself one of the most vigorous, progressive and successful 
farmers of his native township, the fine farm being devoted to diversified 
agriculture and stock-growing. Mr. Griffin gives special attention to the 
raising of short-horn cattle and is actively identified with the Indiana 
Short-horn Breeders' Association. He has been one of the influential 
workers in the local ranks of the Democratic party, served several years 
as a member of the advisory board of Perry township, and since 1914 has 
held the office of township trustee. He is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity and he and his wife are zealous members of the Church of 
God. In 1895 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Griffin to Miss Alda 
Lige, daughter of Samuel J. and Nancy Jane (Bailey) Lige, her father 
being a prominent farmer of Jackson township, DeKalb county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Griffin have two children — Velma M. and Erma W. Mr. Griffin 
is a loyal supporter of all measures and enterprises tending to advance 



234 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the best interests of his home county, is a vigorous worker and sagacious 
man, and finds his chief recreation in occasional hunting and fishing trips 
and in enjoying with his family the facilities and pleasures afforded by 
his fine automobile. 

William M. Griffin. — The position of William M. Griffin in the com- 
mercial and financial activities of Fort Wayne affords him an exceptional 
opportunity to exert a decided influence in the forward movement of 
the city toward a higher place among the municipalities of the middle 
west. Always an active leader along business and industrial lines, the 
worth of Mr. Griffin was recognized in a marked degree, when, in March, 
1913, the Commercial Club of Fort Wayne, which had chosen him to serve 
as its president in 1914, voted to revise its constitution in order to permit 
his re-election to the highest executive position in the organization. 
During the years of his presidency the club enjoyed exceptional growth 
in numbers and influence in the upbuilding of the welfare of the city. 
The growth from a membership of three hundred to more than one 
thousand took place during Mr. Griffin's administration. Mr. Griffin is 
a native of Brimfield, Noble county, Indiana. After attending the schools 
there he served for several years as an instructor in the schools of the 
county and then removed to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in which city he 
resided at the time of the outbreak of the Spanish-American war. As a 
member of Company E, of the Thirty-second Michigan volunteers, he 
served during the campaign in the south. Shortly after his honorable dis- 
charge he came to Fort Wayne and entered upon a commercial career. 
He is the president of the Wayne Oil Tank and Pump Company, manu- 
facturers of self-measuring oil-handling equipment and devices, which 
have a nation-wide sale. The business, under the general management 
of Mr. Griffin, who is surrounded by men of experience and skill, has 
grown to great proportions. The growth of the popularity of the auto- 
mobile, the increasingly stringent laws governing the handling and storage 
of oil, and the widespread demand for modern systems of handling oil, 
have combined to bring prosperity to this growing concern. Mr. Griffin 
is a director in several of the leading financial and commercial institu- 
tions of Fort Wayne, and his counsel is an important factor in the progress 
of the interests with which he is connected. He is a charter member 
of the Fort Wayne Rotary Club, a member of the Fort Wayne Country 
Club, of the Chicago Athletic Association, the Chicago Automobile Club, 
and the Columbia Club of Indianapolis. In June, 1902, Mr. Griffin was 
united in marriage with Maud C. Merillat, and they have one child, 
Jack M. The Griffin home on South Fairfield avenue is one of the hand- 
somest residence properties in Fort Wayne. 

Aristide Grosjean. — Within the pages of this history will be found 
individual reference to a number of the members of the Grosjean family, 
whose name has been identified with the annals of Allen county during 
a period of virtually three-fourths of a century, and he whose name 
initiates this paragraph is well upholding the prestige of the patrionymic. 
He was born on the old homestead farm of his father, a short distance 
from Fort Wayne, in Washington township, and the date of his nativity 
was September 15, 1864. His parents, John B. and Mary (Poirson) Gros- 
jean, were both born in the French province of Alsace-Lorraine, which 
became a part of German territory after the close of the Franco-Prussian 
war and which is again the stage of sanguinary conflict in the deplorable 
European war that is now raging. John B. Grosjean was about fourteen 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 235 

years old at the time of the family immigration to the United States and 
it was fully seventy years ago that he numbered himself among the 
energetic farmers of Allen county, Indiana, where he achieved success 
through his well directed endeavors and where both he and his wife died 
when venerable in years. Concerning their children brief data are given 
on other pages, in the sketch of the career of their son, John B. Aristide 
Grosjean found his childhood and youth compassed by the benignant 
and invigorating influences of the home farm and his early educational 
advantages were those afforded in the public schools of Allen county. 
When about twenty years of age he became associated with his brothers, 
Julian and Edward, in the lumber business at Wallen, this county, and 
after the lapse of eight years he purchased his brothers' interests in 
the business. He continued to operate the saw mill and conduct a general 
lumber business in an individual way for the ensuing eight years, at the 
expiration of which he sold the plant and business and removed to Fort 
Wayne, where he devoted about eighteen months to the retail grocery 
trade. For the next year he was engaged in the sale of farm imple- 
ments and machinery, and his next occupation was that of foreman of 
city trucking operations, a position which he held for eighteen months. 
Since that time he has been actively engaged in cement construction 
work, as one of the representative and successful exponents of this im- 
portant line of enterprise in the metropolis of his native county. He 
takes a lively interest in all things touching the welfare of his home city 
and native county, is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife 
hold membership in the Congregational church. On October 22, 1889, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Grosjean to Miss Sarah Little, who 
was born and reared at Fort Wayne and who likewise is of distinguished 
French ancestry on the distaff side, her maternal grandfather, Colonel 
Louis Humbert, having served as a gallant officer in the French army 
under the great Napoleon and having taken prominent part in the Napol- 
eonic wars. Mrs. Grosjean is a daughter of Alfred and Mary E. (Hum- 
bert) Little, the former of whom was born in Maryland and the latter in 
Ohio, the father having devoted the major part of his active career to 
the painter's trade and business and having resided for several years 
past in the home of his daughter Sarah, wife of the subject of this sketch, 
his wife being deceased and Mrs. Grosjean being the elder of their two 
children ; Grace, the younger daughter, is the wife of George A. Stephans, 
of Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Grosjean have two children, Wadge 
and Amber, both of whom remain at the parental home, and the former 
is associated with his father in the cement contracting business. 

John B. Grosjean is another of the native sons of Allen county who 
has proved definitely alert and resourceful in connection with business 
activities and who is now one of the substantial citizens of Fort Wayne, 
where he conducts a large and prosperous business as a general con- 
tractor in cement-construction work. He was born on the old home- 
stead farm of his father, in Washington township, a few miles distant 
from Fort Wayne, and the date of his nativity was September 14, 1850, 
so that he may consistently be termed a scion of one of the pioneer 
families of Allen county. He is a son of John B. and Mary (Poirson) 
Grosjean, both of whom were born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, now a 
German province and the stage of much of the stupendous and horrible 
military activities of the present great European war. John B. Grosjean, 
a representative of sterling old French stock, was a lad of about fourteen 



236 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

years when he accompanied his parents to America, and he was reared 
to manhood in the United States. As a young man he became one of 
the industrious exponents of agricultural enterprise in Allen county, 
where he improved a good farm near Fort Wayne, and he passed the 
later years of his long and useful life in retirement and in the enjoyment 
of the rewards of his former earnest toil and endeavor. Both he and his 
wife were venerable in age at the time of their death and the names of 
both are held in lasting honor in the county that so long represented 
their home. Of their children the eldest is Felix, who is a representative 
farmer in Washington township, this county; John B., of this review, 
was the next in order of birth; Celia and Joseph are deceased; Edward 
is a resident of Fort Wayne; Felicia is the wife of John Irving, of Los 
Angeles, California; Mary is the wife of Benjamin Christian, of Fort 
Wayne; Julian, who likewise maintains his home in Fort Wayne, is 
individually mentioned in other pages; Aristide is likewise men- 
tioned; Ella is deceased; Clara is the wife of William Morrison, of 
Fort Wayne ; and Frank died in childhood. John B. Grosjean acquired 
his early education in the public schools and continued to be associated 
with his father in the operations of the home farm until he had attained 
to his legal majority. For a period of about eight years thereafter he 
was actively and successfully identified with the lumber business and 
the operation of saw mills. He finally erected a saw mill at Wallen, this 
county, and after operating the same about four years established a tile 
manufactory at Areola, Lake township, where later he erected also a 
grain elevator, which latter he operated only one year. He continued 
to give his attention to the tile business about ten years, and then disposed 
of his interest in the well established enterprise, besides selling also three 
farms which he had purchased in the county. He then, in 1900, estab- 
lished his residence in the city of Fort Wayne, where for the first year 
he gave his attention to the retail grocery business. After his retirement 
from this line of enterprise he was for four years engaged in the real 
estate business, and he then established his present cement business, 
which has been developed to substantial proportions and involves various 
kinds of cement construction work, including the building of cement 
walks and also architectural concrete work. Mr. Grosjean is one of 
the progressive and highly esteemed business men of the Allen county 
metropolis, is liberal and public-spirited as a citizen, and though he is a 
staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party he has had no 
ambition for political office of any kind. Both he and his wife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. For his first wife Mr. 
Grosjean wedded Miss Mary Hudson, who was born and reared in Fort 
Wayne, and she passed to the life eternal in 1880, having become the 
mother of two children — Edgar, who resides in Fort Wayne, and Abbie, 
who died in childhood. On March 30, 1882, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Grosjean to Miss Mary Cook, who was born at Fort Wayne and 
who is a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Pegg) Cook, both natives of 
the state of New York. Jacob Cook was a boy of eight years when his 
parents became pioneer settlers of Fort Wayne, where he was reared to 
maturity, and he eventually became one of the prosperous farmers of 
Allen county, where both he and his wife passed the residue of their 
lives. Of their eight children the first three — Carrie, Clarence and 
Arthur — are deceased, Mrs. Grosjean having been the fourth child ; James 
is deceased ; Jennie resides in Fort Wayne ; George is a resident of the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 237 

state of Micliigan; and Etta is the wife of Frederick Lemon, of Allen 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Grosjean became the parents of three children, 
of whom the first two — Ernest and Ralph — are deceased; and the third, 
Velma, is, in 1916-17, attending the James Millekin college at Decatur, 
Illinois. 

Julian Grosjean, who is a successful and representative contractor in 
concrete construction work, with headquarters in the city of Fort Wayne, 
has been a resident of Allen county from the time of his birth, which 
occurred on his father's old homestead farm, in Washington township, a 
few miles distant from Fort Wayne, August 5, 1862. He is a son of 
John B. and Mary (Poisson) Grosjean, both of whom, as the names defi- 
nitely indicate, having been of French ancestry, and they were born in 
the province of Alsace-Lorraine, France, a district that is now a German 
province. John B. Grosjean was a lad of about fourteen years when he 
came to America and settled in Allen county, Indiana, about seventy 
years ago, his energy and ability having enabled him to gain place as 
one of the representative farmers of Washington township. Both he and 
his wife attained to venerable age and were honored pioneer citizens of 
the county at the time of their death. Of their children the eldest is 
Felix, a prosperous farmer of Washington township; John B. is specifi- 
cally mentioned on other pages ; Cleia and Joseph are deceased ; Edward 
is identified with business activities in Fort Wayne ; Felicia is the wife 
of John Irving, of Los Angeles, California ; Mary is the wife of Benjamin 
McQuiston, of Fort Wayne ; Julian, of this review, was the next in order 
of birth ; Aristide is individually mentioned elsewhere in this publication ; 
Ella is deceased ; Clara is the Avif e of William Morrison, of Fort Wayne ; 
and Frank died in childhood. Julian Grosjean was reared to the sturdy 
discipline of the home farm and in the meanwhile made good use of the 
advantages afforded in the public schools of his native county. At the 
age of twenty-one years he became concerned in the operation of a saw 
mill and continued thus to be identified with the manufacturing of lum- 
ber for a period of about ten years. For three years thereafter he was 
engaged in the grocery business in Fort Wayne, and after his retirement 
from this line of enterprise devoted five j^ears to buying lumber for the 
Studebakers. He then engaged in his present line of businss, and as a 
contractor in modern concrete work has erected several high-grade build- 
ings, besides giving attention also to all other general lines of cement 
construction, his successful operations giving him place as one of the 
substantial business men of his native county, where he has secure van- 
tage-ground in popular esteem. Mr. Grosjean is a Republican in politics, 
is affiliated with the Tribe of Ben Hur, and both he and his v\^ife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. August 21, 1888, re- 
corded the marriage of Mr. Grosjean to Miss Grace M. Sechler, who was 
born at Ossian, Wells county, Indiana, and was a child at the time of 
the family removal to Allen county. She is a daughter of the late Jacob 
and Catherine C. (Horn) Sechler, her father having been for many years 
a prosperous merchant in Fort Wayne and Huntertown, and her maternal 
grandfather, Hon. Patrick Horn, having served as a representative in 
the lower house of the Indiana legislature. Mrs. Grosjean was the fourth 
in order of birth in a family of five children, the first born having been 
Cyrilus, who is deceased ; Milo H. is a resident of Fort Wayne and Charles 
of Sugar Loaf, Colorado ; and Nellie is the wife of Charles W. Warcup, 



238 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

of Marslialltown, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Grosjean have four children — 
Ethel, Arthur, Harold and Bernice. 

Asa G. Grosvenor. — Technical ability, executive and initiative energy 
and a high sense of civic loyalty make Asa Walters Grosvenor specially 
eligible for the office of which he is now the valued incumbent, that of 
county surveyor of Allen county, a position to which he was elected in 
November, 1916, and the duties of which he assumed on the first of the 
following January. Mr. Grosvenor 's reputation as a civil and construc- 
tion engineer far transcends local limitations and he has been identified 
wnth a large amount of important engineering work since establishing 
his home in Fort Wayne, even as he had been previously in the state of 
New York and elsewhere. Mr. Grosvenor has the unique distinction of 
reverting to Constantinople, Turkey, as the place of his nativity, his birth 
having there occurred, November 7, 1875. In 1867 his father became a 
member of the faculty of Robert College in that oriental city, where he 
continued his effective educational service for a period of twenty years, 
at the expiration of which he returned to the United States and assumed 
the chair of international law in historic old Amherst College, Massa- 
chusetts, where he still remains as a revered professor emeritus. This 
distinguished educator, Professor Edw^in A. Grosvenor, was born at New- 
buryport, Massachusetts, and his wife is a native of Millbury, that state, 
both being representatives of fine old colonial stock in New England, 
that gracious cradle of much of our national history. Professor Grosve- 
nor was graduated in Andover Theological Seminary and was ordained a 
clergyman of the Congregational church, as a representative of which he 
went forth as a missionary and educator in Constantinople. He is a 
Democrat in his political allegiance and is affiliated with the Psi Upsilon 
college fraternity. He has given exalted service as a clergyman and 
educator, and, now venerable in years, he is revered alike for his noble 
character and his fine intellectual attainments. Of the three children, 
Asa W., of this review, is the eldest ; Gilbert H. and Edwin P. are twins, 
the former being now in the newspaper business in Washington and the 
latter is associated with Harry W. Taft in New York City. Asa W. 
Grosvenor was reared in a home of distinctive culture and this in itself 
eould not but prove a fortuitous condition and a spur to intellectual 
achievement. In early life he left his native city in the far Orient and 
carried forward his educational work in the United States until he re- 
ceived, in 1897, the degree of Bachelor of Science from Amherst College. 
He forthwith entered the celebrated Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, and in the same was graduated with the class of 1899. There- 
after, under civil service, he held for two years a position as supervising 
architect in connection with the government at Washington, and for six 
years thereafter held the post of civil engineer on the lines of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, west of Pittsburgh. He was thereafter assistant engineer 
in Ohio, and at New Castle, Pennsylvania, and finally was assigned to 
headquarters in the service of the Pennsylvania Company at Fort Wayne. 
He finally resigned his position to accept the post of superintendent of 
construction of tunnels under the East river. New York city, in the em- 
ploy of S. Pearson & Son, of London, England, the celebrated firm of 
contractors. After giving effective service in this important capacity 
and one year of professional work as assistant engineer in the emplcfy of 
the New York Central Railroad, Mr. Grosvenor came again to Fort 
Wayne, where, in March, 1909, he opened an office and engaged in the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 239 

work of his profession as a civil and consulting engineer and supervisor 
of construction. He has designed and directed the construction of many- 
fine concrete bridges, has made special surveys for floor protection work 
and designed the buildings of the Fort Wayne Oil & Supply Company. 
In this city he was the designer also of the Harrison street bridge, and 
at Wabash, Indiana, designed and supervised the construction of a mod- 
ern concrete bridge seven hundred feet in length, over the Wabash 
river. Though he gives close attention to his official duties as county 
surveyor of Allen county he is able to continue effectively his general 
professional work, in connection with which he has worthily won his 
success and prestige. Mr. Grosvenor is a Republican in his political 
proclivities, he and his wife are members of the First Presbyterian church 
of Fort Wayne, he is affiliated with Sol D. Bayless Lodge, No. 359, Ancient 
Free & Accepted Masons, and also with the Psi Upsilon college fraternity. 
October 27, 1904, recorded the marriage of Mr. Grosvenor to Miss Gert- 
rude King Hanna, daughter of Oliver S. and Mary Ellen (Nuttman) 
Hanna, of Fort Wayne, and of the three children of this union two are 
living, Juliet Hanna and Florence Walters. The only son, Jonathan Hol- 
man, died at the age of two years. 

Charles Grotrian. — One of the older residents of Madison township 
is Charles Grotrian, retired farmer and veteran of the Civil war, and 
a resident of Allen county since he came to America, in 1854, as a lad of 
fifteen years. He is the son of Fred and Wilhelmina (Hassel) Grotrian, 
both of German birth, who settled on a farm in Allen county when they 
reached America with their little family. They lived quietly and pros- 
pered agreeably, and saw their closing days on the farm they acquired 
on coming into the county. They were the parents of six children, 
four of them now living. Charles Grotrian attended school in Allen 
county, and the most of his educational advantages were found after he 
came to his adopted country. When the Civil war was fairly well ad- 
vanced he enlisted for service in the Ninety-first Indiana Volunteers, 
serving till the close of hostilities, when he returned to his home and 
engaged in farming-. He gradually acquired land and when he retired 
from active life, in 1906, he was the owner of two hundred and twenty 
acres of the finest land in the county. He moved to Maples, in Jefferson 
township, and is living there at this time. Mr. Grotrian is a Democrat, 
but not active in polities. He was married in 1863 to Miss Henrietta Gable, 
a native German, and they are the parents of nine children — Charles A,, 
Fred H., Frank and Daniel, twins; Wilhelmina, Henrietta and Clara. 
The eighth and ninth? born are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Grotrian are 
members of the German Lutheran church. 

James 0. Grove, D. C, is a thoroughly skilled and successful exponent 
of the benignant system of chiropractic, which has proven a splendid 
aid in the alleviation of human suffering and in the eradicating of many 
of the ills to which human flesh is heir. He is an enthusiast in his pro- 
fession and in the practice of the same is well established in the city of 
Fort Wayne, as one of the leading representatives of the chiropractic 
school in Indiana. Dr. Grove was born in Perry county, Ohio, March 29, 
1874, and is a son of Hiram and Leah (Boyer) Grove, the latter of whom 
is deceased. Hiram Grove, of German lineage, was born and reared in 
Perry county, Ohio, a scion of a sterling pioneer family of that section 
of the Buckeye state, and during his entire active career he has given 
close allegiance to the basic industry of agriculture, of which he con- 



240 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

tiniied a prominent and honored exponent in his native county. He is 
the owner of a farm in Adams county, Indiana, served sixteen years as 
county trustee in Darke county, Ohio, is a Democrat in his political pro- 
clivities and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. Of the children the 
eldest, Harry, is now a resident of Oklahoma; Noah resides at Sturgis, 
Michigan ; Mary is the wife of William Klipstein, residing in Ohio ; James 
0., of this review, was the next in order of birth; Charles is in Texas; 
Orrin in Oklahoma ; John died in infancy ; George and Grover reside in 
the state of Oklahoma; and William and Ralph died in infancy. Dr. 
Grove is indebted to the public schools of Ohio for his early education, 
and in the earlier period of his business career he was a traveling sales- 
man for a firm engaged in the flour trade. Later he was identified 
actively with the buying and shipping of grain for a period of ten years, 
with headquarters at Lagrange, Indiana, and finally he became deeply 
impressed with the consistency and value of the comparatively new 
system of chiropractics, with the result that he went to the city of 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he entered the Michigan College of 
Chiropractics, in which he was graduated in 1912 and from which he 
received his degree of Doctor of Chiropractics. In March of that year 
he opened an office in Fort Wayne, and here he has built up a substantial 
practice of representative order, his success having fully justified his 
choice of profession. He is a director of the Indiana State Association 
of Chiropractic and has been influential in the furtherance of the system 
of practice with which he has identified himself with characteristic 
earnestness and enthusiasm. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a Shriner. 
On March 3, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Grove to Miss Beryl 
Glazier, and they have four children: Doris, James 0., Jr., Clark and 
Leah Marguerite. 

Herman H. Grubb is one of the substantial business men and influ- 
ential citizens of his native county and now resides in the fi.ne little city 
of New Haven, in Adams township. He is vice-president of the New 
Haven State Bank and, since 1911, has given effective service in the 
office of superintendent of the Wabash Valley Utilities Co. Mr. Grubb 
was born at Harlan, this county, October 26, 1869, a son of Ira I. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Oberholtzer) Grubb. Ira I. Grubb was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, June 3, 1838, and in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany came to Indiana when a young man. At the time of the Civil war 
he owned and operated a wagon shop at Harlan, and thereafter he pur- 
chased the old Oberholtzer homestead farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, in Springfield township, where he continued to give his attention 
successfully to agricultural enterprise during the residue of his active life. 
He died November 24, 1911, at the age of seventy-three years, the loved 
wife of his youth having passed away at the age of fifty-three years and 
both having been earnest members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. 
He was a Democrat in politics and was affiliated ^vith the Masonic fra- 
ternitj' — a man of sterling character and a loyal citizen who was respected 
by all who knew him. Of the children the eldest is Charles C, who 
remains on the old homestead farm ; Lockie L. is the wife of J. C. Hursh, 
of Auburn, Indiana ; Herman H., of this sketch, was the next in order of 
birth ; Berne B. resides in the city of Lafayette, this state ; and Mary J. 
is the wife of Rev. S. E. Slater, of Auburn, Indiana. After having availed 
himself of the advantages of the public schools, Herman H. Grubb 
attended the university at Valparaiso, Indiana, and thereafter was em- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 241 

ployed for some time in his brother's grocery store at Harlan. For one 
year he operated a creamery in that village and for three years thereafter 
was engaged in the hardware and lumber business at St. Joseph, this 
state. For six years he operated a saw mill and handle factory at St. Joe, 
and then sold the plant and business and, in 1904, removed to New Haven, 
where he was associated with C. W. Sperry in the same line of industrial 
enterprise until 1911. He then sold his interest in the business and has 
since held the office of superintendent of the Wabash Valley Utilities Co., 
as previously stated in this article. A staunch advocate of the cause of 
the Democratic party, Mr. Grubb has not been ambitious for political 
office, though he gave six years of effective service as a member of the 
village council of New Haven. In the Masonic fraternity he has received 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, besides being affiliated with 
the Mystic Shrine, the Knights of Pythias, and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He is one of the active and valued members of the New Haven 
Commercial Club. In addition to his banking interests he purchased the 
old Herrick homestead of one hundred acres, in Springfield township, and 
gives to the same a general supervision. June 4, 1892, recorded the mar- 
riage of Mr. Grubb to Miss Harriet Herrick, who likewise was born and 
reared in Allen county, and the one child of this union is a son, C. Glenn, 
who remains at the parental home. Mrs. Grubb is a daughter of Arona 
and Mary (Boger) Herrick, the former of whom vv^as born in the state of 
New York and the latter in Ohio. Mr. Herrick came to Allen county, 
Indiana, about 1848, purchased a tract of land near Harlan and became 
one of the pioneer farmers of the county. In 1864 he went forth in de- 
fense of the Union, as a member of Company D, One Hundred and Fifty- 
fifth Indiana Infantry, and in his army service contracted illness from 
which he never recuperated fully, his death having occurred in 1876. 
His wife long survived him and was venerable in years at the time of her 
death, July 4, 1912. Mr. Herrick was a stalwart Republican and was 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Grubb was the fifth in a 
family of six children and was born on the old homestead farm near 
Harlan, a property now owned by her husband, the date of her nativity 
having been January 6, 1870. The eldest of the children, Andrew, is de- 
ceased, as is also Delia A. ; Ida S. is the wife of 0. D. Applegate, of this 
county; and Catherine and William are deceased. 

Frank J. Gruber has become one of the representative figures in 
connection with the industrial and general business activities of his native 
city and his civic liberality and progressiveness are on a parity with his 
ability and successful achievement as a captain of industry, he being 
the proprietor of the Frank Gruber Boiler Works, which represents one 
of the important industrial enterprises of Fort Wayne. Mr. Gruber 
was born in this city on the 13th of July, 1865, and is a son of Michael and 
Veronica (Huhn) Gruber, both of whom were born in Germany, though 
both were young at the time of the immigration of the respective families 
to America. Michael Gruber was afforded the advantages of the excel- 
lent schools of his native land and was sixteen years of age at the time 
of his disembarkation in the port of New York city. He remained in 
the national metropolis six years and there thoroughly skilled himself 
as a workman at the tailor's trade. At the expiration of the period noted 
he came to Indiana and established his residence in Fort Wayne. Here 
he was employed at his trade in the Nurdlinger tailoring establishment, 
and later in that of Townley Brothers. About the year 1871 he estab- 



242 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

lished a retail grocery at the corner of Wilt and Van Buren streets, and 
here he built up a substantial business, his active connection with the 
same having continued until about fifteen years prior to his death, and 
the business being still conducted at that location by one of his sons. A 
severe attack of smallpox prevented his enlistment for service in the 
Civil war, though it was his loyal ambition to go forth in defense of the 
Union. The original home of Michael Gruber after he had established 
his residence in Fort Wayne was one block west of the Bluff ton plank 
road, now known as Broadway, in the city of Fort Wayne. After he 
established his grocery business he removed to the house which he had 
built some time before engaging in the grocery business next, to his 
store, and this old homestead, at 722 Wilt street, is now owned and 
occupied by his son, Edward J., who also owns and conducts the grocery 
business established by the father. It was in this house that Frank 
Gruber, the immediate subject of this revieAv, was born. Michael Gruber 
was one of the well known citizens of Fort Wayne and the community 
was deeply shocked when he met a tragic death, at the age of seventy-two 
years. He was struck by an engine while walking on the tracks of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad near Fort Wayne, and died shortly afterward as 
the result of his injuries, his loved and devoted wife having survived 
him by only eight months and having been sixty-nine years of age when 
she too was summoned to the life eternal, both having been lifelong and 
zealous communicants of the Catholic church. Of their nine children 
the first two died in infancy ; Elizabeth, who by her devoted consecration 
is known as Sister M. Veronica, is a member of the Catholic sisterhood 
of the Poor Handmaids of Christ, and is a teacher in one of the Catholic 
parochial schools of the city of Chicago ; Frank J., of this sketch, was 
the next in order of birth ; Jacob J. is employed as a skilled pattern- 
maker at the Fort Wayne Electric Works; Veronica is the wife of John 
Winbaugh, of Fort Wayne ; Edward J. resides at the old family home- 
stead and conducts the grocery business established by his father, as 
has been previously stated in this context; Michael J. died one week 
prior to the demise of his mother and was twenty-seven years of age 
at the time ; Carrie is the wife of George Welch, of Fort Wayne. Frank J. 
Gruber gained his early educational discipline in the excellent parochial 
school of St. Paul's Catholic church, on Washington street, and he began 
his practical experience as a worker when but thirteen -y^ars old. At 
this juncture in his career he found employment in t^e Shurrick stave 
factory, but shortly afterward entered service in the Olds spoke manu- 
factory, on Lafayette street, where he was employed one year. For the 
purpose of learning thoroughly the boilermaker's trade he then entered 
upon an apprenticeship in the establishment of the firm of Kerr-Murray, 
where he gained practical experience. About one year later he entered 
the boiler shop of the Bass Foundry & Machine Works, where he com- 
pleted his apprenticeship and where he continued to be employed about 
eighteen years, though for a short interval he had been employed in 
the Matthews Boiler Works, in the city of South Bend. Later he was 
employed at his trade for a time at Terre Haute, in the shops of the 
Vandalia Railroad Company. In 1895 Mr. Gruber and Gustave Bengs 
established in Fort Wayne the National Boiler & Sheet Iron Works, and 
his original plant, one of modest order, having occupied the land on 
which now stands the city gas tank. After the lapse of one year he 
purchased his partner's interest in the business and changed the title 



TH 



j 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 243 

of the concern to Gruber Boiler "Works. Under this name the enterprise 
was continued nine years, and it had in the meanwhile grown to be 
one of substantial order. At the expiration of that period Mr. Gruber 
admitted Gustave Bengs to partnership, whereupon the title was changed 
to the Gruber & Bengs Iron Works. About one year later Mr. Bengs 
organized an engineering company, with which he is still identified. The 
thriving business of Mr. Gruber has since been conducted by him in an 
independent way and under the title of the Frank Gruber Boiler Works, 
the establishment being situated on North Barr street at the corner of 
Duck street, and the main shop being sixty-two by one hundred and 
fifty feet in dimensions. The plant has the most modern equipment and 
facilities for the turning out of boilers, tanks and sheet-iron work of 
every description, and its provisions include the best devices for welding 
and cutting by the oxygen-acetylene gas method. Mr. Gruber has proved 
a most energetic and resourceful business man and is one of the world's 
great army of productive workers. His political allegiance is given to 
the Democratic party, and he and his wife are zealous communicants 
of the parish of St. Patrick's Catholic church. On September 18, 1886, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gruber to Miss Louisa Zimmerman, 
who likewise was born and reared in Fort Wayne, and they have five 
children — Stella, Irma, Helen, Lenore, and Frank J., Jr. Stella is now the 
wife of Albert Derheimer, of Fort Wayne, and all of the other children are 
still members of the gracious home circle. 

Olaf N. Guldlin, M. E. — The success which the true American holds 
in highest estimation is that which has been achieved through individual 
ability and well directed effort, and he whose name introduces this review 
has measured fully up to the high standard thus set in the land of his 
adoption, the while he is a scion of the fine Scandinavian stock from 
which America has had much to gain and nothing to lose. Through 
his exceptional technical ability and his executive and administrative 
talent he has become one of the leading captains of industry in the city 
of Fort Wayne, and his reputation in his chosen sphere of endeavor far 
transcends local confines, to mark him an influential figure in the field 
of industrial enterprise in which he has earnestly and worthily directed 
his activities. In 1885 Mr. Guldlin established his residence in Fort 
Wayne, and in 1888 he became the founder of the now extensive and 
important industrial enterprise conducted under the title of the Western 
Gas Construction Company, of which noteworthy corporation he has 
been president from its inception. A man of sterling character, his 
ambition has caused him to direct his course along a normal and im- 
portant line of enterprise for which his technical ability specially qualifies 
him, and he has been significantly the architect of his own fortunes — • 
the builder of the ladder on which he has risen to the plane of large 
achievement and well merited success. Mr. Guldlin was born in the 
fine old city of Christiana, Norway, on December 6, 1858, and there he was 
reared to adult age, the while he was given excellent opportunities for 
the proper development of his alert mental faculties and natural me- 
chanical talent. He applied himself with characteristic diligence as a 
student in the Technical College in the city of Bergen, in his native 
land, and later in the celebrated Polytechnikum in the city of Munchen, 
Bavaria, Germany, after about a year's practical experience in the iron 
works of A. L. Thune at Christiana. He then, at the age of twenty-one 
years, severed the ties that bound him to home and fatherland and set 



244 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

forth, with high aspirations and indomitable courage, to make for him- 
self a place in the United States, which he wisely looked upon as a 
country of broader opportunities. Soon after his arrival in America 
Mr. Guldlin found employment in the engineering department of the 
celebrated Baldwin Locomotive Works, in the city of Philadelphia, and 
with this concern he remained two and a half years. His ambitious 
purpose and recognized ability conserved his advancement at that time, 
even as they have in the successive stages of his vigorous and productive 
career, and upon leaving Philadelphia he accepted the position of engi- 
neer for James R. Smedberg, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, then a cele- 
brated gas engineer. In 1885 he assumed the post of engineer for the Kerr- 
Murray Manufacturing Company, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, and, as previ- 
ously noted, he here initiated, in 1888, an independent business. It was 
in this year that he and his associates, W. A. Croxton and Frank D. 
Moses, here opened an office as mechanical and consulting engineers. It 
was through this medium that he was finally enabled to establish the 
modest enterprise that has been developed into the present extensive 
industry controlled by the Western Gas Construction Company. Within 
the first year after he had opened his office in Fort Wayne Mr. Guldlin 
entered into a contract for the erection of a large fuel-gas plant in the 
city of Akron, Ohio, members of the Lloyd family of Detroit, Michigan, 
having been interested principals in the enterprise. When, in 1890, Mr. 
Guldlin determined to expand his field of operations by effecting an 
incorporation of the business which he had established in Fort Wayne, 
he was fortunate in obtaining the ready co-operation of Messrs. Gordon 
W. and Ernest F. Lloyd, who were associated with him in the incorpor- 
ation of the Western Gas Construction Company, of which he became 
president, Gordon W. Lloyd treasurer, and Ernest F. Lloyd secretary. 
In January, 1902, he purchased the interests of the Lloyds, and the com- 
pany then became distinctively local in the personnel of its stock- 
holders and with the following corps of officers, which is still main- 
tained : Olaf N. Guldlin, president ; Samuel M. Foster, vice-president ; 
Charles McCulloch, secretary; and J. Ross McCulloch, treasurer. The 
following brief record concerning this representative industrial concern 
is well worthy of perpetuation in this connection : ' ' The history of this 
business has been one of continuous growth, and operations were initiated 
in a small machine shop, sixty-five by one hundred feet in dimensions, 
that was erected in 1893. In the same year was erected also a small 
building for the accommodation of the general offices and the draughting 
department. In 1895 the machine shop was enlarged to a length of two 
hundred and fifty feet, and five years later it was found necessary to 
add a foundry and wrought-iron shop, in order properly to care for the 
increasing business. Two years later equally exigent demands resulted 
in the reconstruction and enlargement of all departments of the plant, 
and from time to time additions have continued to be made until the 
finely equipped institution now covers about thirteen acres of ground. 
The object of the business, or rather its chief function, is the construc- 
tion of gas works machinery and apparatus, for city as well as coke 
oven works, and the business of the company now extends into the most 
diverse sections of the Union, with facilities that make it possible for 
the concern to handle contracts of practically the maximum magnitude. 
The shops in Fort Wayne now give employment to more than four hun- 
dred persons, most of whom are skilled and highly paid artisans, while 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 245 

the field force, engaged in the erection of gas plants on contract, is of 
about equal numerical strength. Of all institutions devoted exclusively 
to the manufacturing of gas apparatus, the plant of the Western Gas 
Construction Company is now the largest in the world, and in addition 
to its extensive domestic business the company now sends its products 
into the European countries, South America, Australia and the Philippine 
Islands. Mr. Guldlin's fame as an expert in his particular line of busi- 
ness is now international. In 1900 he was a delegate from the Western 
Gas Association to the international gas congress held in the city of 
Paris, France. The exhibition made by his company at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition, at St. Louis, in 1904, won for the company three 
grand prizes, five gold medals and four silver medals, after a proper 
demonstration of the methods of operation in appling the various devices 
to practical use in gas plants. In addition were received two gold and 
one bronze medals for exhibits of auxiliary apparatus used by the com- 
pany in its construction work. To Mr. Guldlin personally was awarded 
a grand prize, with diploma, in recognition of his inventions and develop- 
ments in the gas industr3^ The exhibit was visited by gas engineers 
from all parts of the world. He was also appointed a member of the 
international jury of awards, and at the conclusion of the exposition 
he received from its president, Hon. David R. Francis, a personal letter 
attested by Walter B. Stevens, secrtary of th xposition, advising him 
that by direction of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company a com- 
memorative diploma and medal had been conferred upon him in appreci- 
ation of his services. Mr. Guldlin was likewise instrumental in having 
his company represented by an effective exhibit at the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition, San Francisco, in 1915, and on this exhibit was awarded 
the medal of honor, two gold medals and two silver medals, besides which 
Mr. Guldlin was personally awarded a gold medal. In politics this vigor- 
ous and loyal citizen has been unswerving and well fortified in his alleg- 
iance to the Republican party, though he is essentially a business man 
and has no ambition for political preferment. In the time-honored 
Masonic fraternity he has received the royal-arch degrees, and in the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite has attained the thirty-second degree, 
besides being affiliated with the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, and being a life member of the Benevolent & Protective 
Order of Elks. Among the more notable scientific and social organiza- 
tions with which he is further identified may be mentioned the following 
named : The American Society of Mechanical Engineers ; the American 
Gas Institute ; The Pacific Coast Gas Association and the specific organi- 
zations of the same order in the states of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan 
and Wisconsin ; the American Academy of Political and Social Science ; 
the American Political Science Association; American Economic Asso- 
ciation; the Rejuvenated Sons of Jove, in which his membership number 
is 61 ; the Lotus Club of New York city ; the Missouri Athletic Club of 
St. Louis; and the Cosmos Club of San Francisco. On August 28, 1889, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Guldlin to Miss Addie L. Bleekman, 
who was born at Stratford, Fulton county, New York, in November, 1863, 
who is a representative of one of the old families of the Empire state, 
and who was a child at the time of her parents' removal to Indiana, the 
family home being established in Fort Wayne, She is a daughter of 
Jerome and Henrietta (Sixbey) Bleekman, the former of whom is now 
deceased, and the mother resides in Fort Wayne. Mrs. Guldlin continued 



246 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

her studies in the Fort Wayne public schools until she was gradu- 
ated from the high school, and in 1888 she was graduated Ph. B. in 
Buchtel College, at Akron, Ohio, an institution now known as Municipal 
University of Akron. She is a woman of most gracious personality, of 
distinctive culture and of high civic ideals. While in college she became 
affiliated with the Eta Chapter of the Delta Gamma sorority, and from 
a brief sketch of her life which appeared in a publication devoted to 
that organization are taken the following extracts: "Mrs. Guldlin is 
very active in club work, particularly in modernizing, simplifying and 
dignifying home work and home industries. Mrs. Guldlin has been on 
many boards and committees and has held in connection with club 
work many offices, both state and national. As chairman of the home- 
economics department of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, 
she was instrumental in making this department a vital and established 
division of the activities of the federation. In this work she traveled ex- 
tensively, during which time she lectured in many states, especially on 
the relation of home economics to the public schools and to all other 
institutions of a community." From still another source is drawn the 
following estimate of this noble and gracious gentlewoman: "After her 
marriage Mrs. Guldlin applied the same energy and study to mastering 
the intricacies of housekeeping and home-building, and the practical 
knowledge which she thus gained has led her to take an active interest 
in the domestic-science department of the women's clubs of Fort Wayne, 
It was her active interest in the home economics subject, which foresaw 
the great need of a scientific knowledge of home-making for the masses, 
which prepared her for her work. With this realization she studied the 
history of the movement in the United States, what it had done, what 
it hoped to achieve, and she became acquainted with the recognized 
leaders of home economics. With their active co-operation she was able 
to carry forward the work of her department and make it a vital thing 
in the home club and community life. She became an authority on this 
subject and was made chairman of the home-economic department of 
the Women's League of Fort Wayne. Later she was made chairman 
of the same department of the Indiana Union of Literary Clubs, and 
afterward chairman of the home-economic department of the Indiana 
State Federation of Women's Clubs. In 1906 came to her further and 
merited distinction, in being chosen the executive head of the same 
department for the General Federation of Women's Clubs. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Guldlin have been specially active in their efforts to further 
civic improvements, and it was largely through their unselfish and 
well directed efforts that, in 1911, the children's playground on Van 
Buren street, Fort Wayne, was constructed and equipped. The idea origi- 
nated with Mrs. Guldlin, and through her club associations she dissemi- 
nated her views on the subject until the public became convinced of 
the merit of the proposition and funds were donated for the desired 
object. For weeks Mr. Guldlin personally supervised and directed the 
work of grading and equipping the land that had been obtained for 
the purpose, along the St. Mary's river, and in addition to this he and 
his wife contributed liberally to the fund needed for the achievement of 
the desired ends. The members of the committee of the playgrounds 
association, in token of the efforts put forth by both Mr. and Mrs. Guldlin 
in the furtherance of this admirable work, insisted on giving to the new 
resort for the children the title of the Mr. and Mrs. Guldlin Playgrounds." 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 247 

It is believed that by quotations from various sources may best be 
conveyed an idea of the personality and splendid services of Mrs, Guldlin, 
and thus in conclusion of this article the publisher finds pleasure and 
consistency in making excerpts, with minor elimination and paraphrase, 
from an appreciative article that was written by W. M. Herschell and 
that appeared in the Indianapolis News of October 14, 1911: "When 
the Indiana State Federation of Women's Clubs meets in annual con- 
vention at Indianapolis, October 24-6, there will be among those present 
an energetic little woman who proudly points to the fact that she is a 
citizen of Fort Wayne ; and, in turn, Fort Wayne can proudly point 
to Mrs. Olaf N. Guldlin, for she has placed that city on the map of 
womanly achievement. Mrs. Guldlin is the chairman of the home- 
economies committee of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, and 
has spread the gospel of good housekeeping in every section of the United 
States. The rise of Mrs. Guldlin into prominence as an American club 
woman is the result of her belief in her own household philosophy. She 
first attracted national attention among women when she read a paper 
on household economics before the general federation when it met in 
Boston, five years ago. This live-wire Fort Wayne woman read her paper 
and instantly found herself in the club limelight. She was praised for 
her views on household economics and, following the introduction of a 
resolution to abolish the household-economics department because of 
lack of interest in it, made a stand for its retention that reflected credit 
on her. She declared the women's clubs of the United States could not 
afford to abolish any department of interest in the upbuilding of home 
life. So emphatic was she in her stand for the principle of home economics 
that she was elected chairman of the department, and, to-day, there 
is no branch of womanly effort that is receiving more attention. This 
energetic Fort Wayne woman who tackled the job of making the work 
effective has made the work effective ! When the general federation 
met in Cincinnati, in May, 1910, no woman was as pleasantly discussed 
as Mrs. Guldlin. Her name was heard in committee meetings, in the 
lobbies and in every place where clubwomen gathered to talk. When 
the hour set aside in the convention for the discussion of household 
economics arrived, Mrs. Decker, a leading clubwoman of Denver, took 
the platform and the writer heard her pay a tribute to Mrs. Gulrllin 
that must have made the heart of every Hoosier woman throb with 
pride. This talk fairly brought the convention to its feet in approving 
Mrs. Guldlin 's work. Mrs. Guldlin is a little woman, but she is a dynamo 
of energy. Her rise as an American clubwoman has not been self -sought. 
She has gone on doing her work and her friends have done the boosting. 
As an advocate of right living she has worked so earnestly that to-day 
her mail is almost as heavy as that of any business firm in Fort Wayne. 
From every quarter — town and country — she gets letters asking for 
information concerning home economics. She collects ideas from clubs 
all over the country and then passes them on. She keeps no good ideas 
to herself in order to trade on them when the next general federation 
meets. Day in and day out she and her fellow-laborers in the cause 
are seeking to have domestic science taught in every American public 
school and to amplify the work in every other consistent and practical 
avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Guldlin spread the spirit of their home happiness 
over Fort Wayne. For instance, there is a large playground that bears 
their name, a testimonial to their worthiness as citizens. Mr. and Mrs. 



248 BIOGRAPPIICAL SKETCHES 

Guldlin are childless, but they have several children in their keeping 
for rearing and education. They love children, and every boy and girl 
in Fort Wayne knows it. Their beautiful home extends its gracious 
hospitality and good cheer to old and young alike, and the most intimate 
friends of the popular chatelaine of this home know her heart is bent 
on bettering conditions in American homes and making life brighter 
for all humankind." It may further be added that Mrs. Guldlin is state 
director and district chairman of the Woman's Franchise League, was 
a member of the centennial committee of the Indiana State Federation 
of Women's Clubs at the time of the centennial anniversary of the 
admission of Indiana to statehood, is president of the Fortnightly Club, 
a member of the executive committee of the Women's League, and in 
her home city is an active and valued member of the College Club, the 
City Franchise League, the Art Association, the Associated Charity and 
Rescue Mission, and of the advisory committee of the vocational school 
board. 

George C. Gump. — One of the fine farms of Perry township is that 
owned and occupied by George Calvert Gump, and his prominent status 
as one of the substantial and progressive exponents of agricultural and 
live-stock industry in his native county is the more interesting by reason 
of the fact that his present homestead is the one on which he was born 
and reared, the date of his nativity having been July 31, 1868. His par- 
ents were young when they came to Allen county, where their marriage 
was solemnized, and it was about the year 1856 when they established 
their residence on the well improved farm now owned by the subject 
of this review. At that time the land was little more than a forest and 
the father set to himself the herculean task of reclaiming the farm from 
a virtual wilderness. Indomitable energy and determination brought 
steady progress in their train and eventually the farm yielded forth its 
generous increase from season to season, and peace and prosperity found 
here an abiding place. The parents, George and Harriet (Agenbroad) 
Gump, were honored pioneer citizens of Allen county, Indiana, at the time 
of their death. George Gump was a man of strong individuality and ma- 
ture judgment, was influential in community affairs and commanded the 
unqualified esteem of all who knew him. He served two terms as trustee 
of Perry township and was always ready to lend his co-operation in the 
furtherance of measures and enterprises projected for the general good 
of the community. Of the fine family of thirteen children, two died in 
infancy ; Frank, eldest of the number, is engaged in farming in Nebraska ; 
Mrs. Priseilla Jackson is a resident of Churubusco ; Mrs. Margaret Pulver 
is deceased; Mrs. Alice Flannigan resides in Perry township; Mrs. Jane 
Hursh maintains her home in Perry township ; Madison and Marion reside 
respectively in Auburn, Indiana, and in Perry township; George C, of 
this sketch, was the next in order of birth ; Mrs. Effie Belot is deceased ; 
Mrs. Cora Shambaugh is a resident of Fort Wayne ; and Celestia is de- 
ceased. George C. Gump was reared to manhood on the old home farm, 
early began to contribute his quota to its work, and his youthful educa- 
tional advantages were those of the common schools of the locality and 
period. The old homestead has continued as the stage of his vigorous 
and effective activities of independent order, and the property, compris- 
ing one hundred and eighty-four acres, in Section 15, Perry township, 
came into his possession after the death of his father, he having pur- 
chased the interests of the other heirs. He has made numerous and valu- 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 249 

able improvements on the place, including the erection of his commodious 
and modern residence, which is of cement construction, and which is one 
of the model farm homes of Perry township. Mr. Gump is progressive 
and liberal in his civic attitude, is a Democrat in politics, but has never 
desired or held public office of any description. Septemjjer 3, 1896, re- 
corded the marriage of Mr. Gump to Miss Ivy B. Moudy, who was born 
and reared in Cedar Creek township, this county, a daughter of the late 
Martin and Martha (Updyke) Moudy, who passed their entire lives in 
this county, where the respective families were founded in the early 
pioneer period. Mrs. Gump is one of a family of seven children, and the 
only other surviving members of the same are Mrs. Sylvia Van Zile and 
Mrs. Nora Treese. Mr. and Mrs. Gump have seven children, all of whom 
remain at the parental home, namely : Russell J., Forrest R., Clara B., 
Martha E., George E., Walter C, and Eva F. 

Charles H. Gumpper is a native son of Fort Wayne, a scion of one 
of the sterling old families of Allen county, and through his energy, 
ability and well-directed endeavors has gained a position of prominence 
as one of the representative business men of the city that has been his 
home from the time of his birth and to which his loyalty is of the most 
intense order. He is president of the Grace Construction Company, 
which has developed a substantial and important business in the installing 
of asphalt and other types of street paving and which has successfully 
completed many large contracts, both in Fort Wayne and elsewhere. 
The company has done the street paving in virtually all of the new 
additions to the city of Fort Wayne, including the Harrison Hill, the 
Driving Park and the Weisser Park additions, besides the asphalt paving 
on State street and other thoroughfares of the city. The company gives 
employment to an average force of two hundred and fifty persons and 
is essentially one of the strong and important industrial concerns of 
the Summit City. The company was incorporated in 1910, with a capital 
stock of fifty thousand dollars, and its official corps from the beginning 
has been as here noted : Charles H. Gumpper, president ;■ Mrs. Martin 
J. Grace, vice-president; and Martin J. Grace, secretary, treasurer and 
general manager. Charles H. Gumpper was born in Fort Wayne on 
December 6, 1867, and is a son of Christian C. and Sarah C. (Arnold) 
Gumpper, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. 
Christian C. Gumpper established his residence in Fort Wayne about 
the year 1865, and for about a decade thereafter continued in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. He then engaged in the con- 
fectionery business, with Avhich he continued his connection about thirty- 
five years, within which period he built up a large and prosperous enter- 
prise that marked him as one of the representative business men of the 
city. He passed the closing years of his long and useful life in well- 
earned retirement, his death having occurred in 1896, and his venerable 
widow still maintaining her residence in Fort Wayne. Mr. Gumpper 
was a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and was 
a zealous member of the Grace Reformed church, in which he was an 
elder at the time of his death and of which his widow continued an 
earnest communicant. Of the three children, Ada is the wife of Harry 
A. Keplinger, of Fort Wayne; Charles H., of this review, was the next 
in order of birth ; and Frederick C. is now a resident of Detroit, Michigan. 
Affer having duly profited by the advantages of the public schools 
Charles H. Gumpper completed an effective course in the Fort Wayne 



250 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Business College, and for one year thereafter was in the employ of the 
Keystone Grocery Company. For the ensuing seven years he held a 
clerical and executive position in the offices of the Nickel Plate Railroad, 
and for a quarter of a century thereafter was associated with Conrad 
Neireiter in the insurance business in Fort Wayne. In 1910 he became 
one of the organizers and incorporators of the Grace Construction Com- 
pany, of which he has since been the president and to the affairs of which 
he gives the major part of his time and attention. In politics Mr. Gurap- 
per holds himself aside from strict partisan lines and as an independent 
gives his support to the men and measures meeting his approval as a 
liberal and progressive citizen. He is affiliated with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, including the Mystic Shrine, and he and his wife are active 
members of Grace Reformed church. On December 9, 1891, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Gumpper to Miss Emma Neireiter, daughter 
of Conrad and Harriet (Lepper) Neireiter, of Fort Wayne, and the four 
children of this union are Ruth J., Howard, Ada and Dorothy. 

Jacob D. Gumpper has made a splendid record in connection with 
business affairs of broad scope and his activities have touched many 
and varied lines of enterprise during the course of his long and pro- 
ductive business career. He has maintained his residence in Fort Wayne 
for nearly forty years, was for nearly a score of years one of the most 
successful traveling salesmen for the Bowser Pump & Tank Company, 
which is one of the most important industrial and commercial concerns 
of Fort Wayne, and he is now retained as instructor of salesmen for this 
representative corporation. He is one of the well-known and highly 
esteemed citizens who specially merits recognition in this history. Mr. 
Gumpper was born at Chicora, Butler county, Pennsylvania, on April 
26, 1848, and is a son of Christian C. and Dorothea (Aldinger) Gumpper, 
both of whom continued their residence in the old Keystone state until 
their death and both of whom were earnest communicants of the German 
Lutheran church. Christian C. Gumpper was born and reared in Ger- 
many and came to the United States about the year 1816. He was for 
many years one of the sterling citizens and prominent business men of 
Chicora, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred, and for years he was 
there engaged in the hotel business. Of the children. Christian C, Jr., 
Gottlieb and Henry C. are deceased; Frederica is the widow of Theodore 
Craig and resides at East Butler, Pennsylvania ; and the subject of this 
sketch is the youngest of the children. Jacob D. Gumpper gained his 
youthful education in the schools of his native town and as a lad of 
thirteen years initiated his association with the practical affairs of busi- 
ness by taking a position in a general store at East Brady's Bend, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained thus engaged four years. For six 
years thereafter he was a traveling salesman for a Pittsburgh wholesale 
grocery house, which he thus represented through northeastern Pennsyl- 
vania. After retiring from this position he was for five years indepen- 
dently engaged in the general merchandise business at Carbon Center, 
Pennsylvania, and for five or six years thereafter was identified with 
the oil-producing industry in the Pennsylvania fields. He was connected 
with the Bradford District Oil Exchange in the old Keystone state during 
the period immediately prior to his removal to Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
where he established his residence in 1879 and where he was successfully 
established in the retail grocery business until 1897. It is specially 
worthy of record in this connection that he purchased for use in his 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 251 

store the first oil tank that was manufactured by S. F. Bowser, founder 
of the great manufacturing business that has since been developed from 
a modest nucleus. This purchase was made by Mr. Gumpper on Sep- 
tember 5, 1885, and indicated his early appreciation of the value of the 
invention upon which has been built up the extensive business of the 
Bowser Company of the present day. In September, 1897, Mr. Gumpper 
sold his grocery business and became a traveling representative for the 
Bowser Company, the oil tanks and pumps of which he introduced into 
many different states of the Union. In this connection he made a splendid 
record as a salesman, and in his travels he visited nearly all states of 
the Union. His services as a traveling representative continued until 
September, 1914, and it may well be understood that his broad and varied 
experience makes him a valuable factor in his present executive position 
with the Bowser Company, that of instructor of salesmen. Mr. Gumpper 
is aligned as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Republican party, 
is affiliated with Home Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and 
with the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife hold membership 
in the Third Presbyterian church of Fort Wayne. June 26, 1888, recorded 
the marriage of Mr. Gumpper to Miss Laura M. Dickinson, daughter of 
Philoraen C. and Emma (Thompson) Dickinson, of Fort Wayne, and the 
one child of this union is Harold D., who is in the employ of the Buda 
Electric Company in the city of Chicago. 

James Hager Haberly. — Among the many rising young men of affairs 
in Fort Wayne today James Hager Haberly stands well in the foreground. 
He identified himself early with the Fort Wayne Electric Works and 
there received a general training that fitted him for his present position 
as general manager of the Fort Wayne Engineering and Manufacturing 
Company, with which he has been identified since 1908. Mr. Haberly 
is the son of George W. and Frances M. (Stimpson) Haberly, and he 
was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, on December 16, 1879. George W. 
Haberly was a native Ohioan and the mother was of New York state 
birth and ancestry. They were the parents of five children — Frances M., 
Louise Elizabeth, George W., Samuel S. and James H. Haberly of this 
review. When he was a small lad the father died and, in 1898, the 
mother married Col. Robert S. Robertson, who died in 1906. Mrs. 
Robertson is now a resident of Fort Wayne. James Hager Haberly had 
his early schooling in the schools of Terre Haute, at about the age of 
fourteen entering Howe Military Academy at Howe, Indiana, from which 
institution he was graduated with the class of 1898. He was then nineteen 
years old, and instead of carrying his education through a university 
course he chose to identify himself at once with life's work as a student 
in the Fort Wayne Electric Works. He continued with that concern 
for ten years, filling various positions in the factory and as a member 
of the sales force. It was his aim to neglect no phase of the business, 
and the ten years he spent with that concern were filled to the full with 
the task of gathering experience. This diligence and ambition brought 
a timely reward, for when the Fort Wayne Engineering and Manufac- 
turing Company was incorporated he was elected treasurer and general 
manager of the company. This was in 1908. The products of the Fort 
Wayne Engineering and Manufacturing Com.pany consist of water sys- 
tems, farm lighting plants and garage air systems. The business began 
in a small way, it may be said, and now has a plant covering about three 
acres of ground, with eight large and modern factory buildings. It 



252 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

supplies electric lighting systems for farmers, also current for the oper- 
ation of their small power motors, and it is safe to say that this firm 
has contributed largely to the comfort and well being of the farming 
element of Allen county. Mr. Haberly was married October 23, 1906, 
to Miss Alma Elizabeth Paul, the daughter of Henry C. Paul, of whom 
extended mention will be found elsewhere in these pages. Mr. and Mrs. 
Haberly have one son, Henry Paul. The family have membership in 
Trinity Episcopal church and Mr. Haberly has served the church as 
vestryman. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution 
and is now president of Anthony Wayne chapter of the local body. He 
is a member of the Country Club, the Quest Club, and is president of 
the Fort "Wayne & Decatur Traction Company. He is a Republican 
in politics. 

Edward A. K. Hackett. — A man of noble character and splendid 
ability, the late Edward Alexander Kelly Hackett lifted himself to the 
plane of high and worthy achievement and became one of the prominent 
and influential figures in Indiana journalism and in the directing of 
popular sentiment and action. By his forceful individuality and fine 
intellectuality he became a leader in the newspaper business in the 
Hoosier state, and from 1880 until his death, which occurred August 
28, 1916, he was owner and publisher of the Fort Wayne Sentinel, which 
under his able supervision was maintained at a high standard and became 
one of the most influential daily papers of the state. For a number of 
years he was also the owner of the Indianapolis Sentinel, which reached 
its greatest success and influence under his control, and above all this 
he was dominated by the exalted integrity of purpose and the high 
ideals that make for enlightened and useful citizenship. He was one 
of Fort Wayne's most distinguished and honored citizens, and this history 
would stultify its consistency were there failure to pay within its pages 
a tribute to his memory and to offer at least a brief review of his career. 
His final illness was of very brief duration and renal calculus was the 
immediate cause of his death. Mr. Hackett was born at Bloomfield, 
Pennsylvania, June 29, 1851, and was a scion of one of the old and 
honored families of the historic Keystone state. He made the best 
possible use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of his 
native state and in his youth was enabled to supplement this discipline 
by a course of higher study in Bloomfield Academy, in his home county 
of Perry. It has consistently been said that the discipline of a newspaper 
office is tantamount to a liberal education, and this further reinforcement 
came to Mr. Hackett, for as a young man he learned the printer's trade 
in the office of the Perry County Democrat, a weekly paper published 
at New Bloomfield. After thus gaining working facility in the "art 
preservative of all arts" he was employed at his trade in leading news- 
paper offices in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and other eastern cities, and 
at the age of twenty-three years came to Indiana and established his 
residence at Bluff'ton, judicial center of Wells county. There he pur- 
chased a half interest in the Bluffton Banner, and within a short time 
came into sole control as editor and publisher of this paper. Energy 
and progressiveness characterized his entire career, and thus it may read- 
ily be understood that he made of this enterprise a definite success, thus 
opening the way to broader and more influential activity in connection 
with the newspaper business in northern Indiana. In 1880 Mr. Hackett 
came to Fort Wayne and purchased from William Fleming the plant 




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'p^^ 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 253 

and business of the Fort Wayne Sentinel, his successful genius finding 
in this connection adequate scope for productive action, as shown in 
the fact that he developed the Sentinel into one of the most prosperous 
and influential daily papers in this section of the state and made the 
same potent in the fostering and advancing of community interests along 
both civic and material lines. He continued as owner of the plant and 
business of the Sentinel until the time of his death and the property 
is one of the most valuable of its kind in northern Indiana at the present 
time. As a writer Mr. Hackett was forceful, sure and circumspect, so 
that his editorial utterances carried weight not only in local affairs but 
also in exemplifying the best political thought and polity, his allegiance 
having been given to the Democratic party. From an editorial published 
at the time of his demise are taken the following extracts, which give 
supplemental information concerning his specially successful and broad- 
gauged business career: "Mr. Hackett started the American Farmer, 
which for several years was published in the Sentinel office and later 
sold to a big publishing company. He was also at one time interested 
in the Indianapolis Sentinel, disposing of his interests several years 
before it suspended publication. Several years ago he established the 
Hackett Medical College at Canton, China, placing his eldest daughter, 
Dr. Martha Hackett, in charge. Mr. Hackett owned the Indianapolis 
Sentinel at the same time he owned the Fort Wayne Sentinel. The former 
paper was sold to Belford, Clark & Company, and then Mr. Hackett 
returned to Fort Wayne and devoted his entire attention to the local 
publication." The deep Christian faith of Mr. Hackett guided and gov- 
erned his course in all of the relations of life and was essentially a faith 
not only of sentiment but also of service. He was earnest in the support 
of all moral agencies, including the cause of temperance, and was actively 
identified with the Winona Assembly and Summer Schools Association, 
at Winona Lake, Indiana. He was one of the most earnest and honored 
members of the First Presbyterian church of Fort Wayne, was an elder in 
the same at the time of his death and had also given characteristically 
effective service as superintendent of its Sunday school. Concerning him 
the following appreciative and merited statement has been made: "He 
took an active part in every movement which tended to the betterment 
of Fort Wayne, and his death comes as a loss to the entire city." As 
a young man Mr. Hackett wedded Miss Mary A. Melsheimer, whose father 
was a representative physician and surgeon engaged in practice at Bluff- 
ton, Wells county, and she passed to eternal rest in April, 1898. Of the 
children of this union the first born, Susan, died in infancy; the second 
child, Martha, is a talented physician and has charge of the hospital 
that was founded by her father in the city of Canton, China, as pre- 
viously noted; Helen, the youngest of the children, is the wife of John 
C. Johnson, of Los Angeles, California, and they have two children — 
May Alice and John Edward. On October 16, 1900, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Hackett to Miss Susie Emma Reid, who was born at 
Greenville, Bond county, Illinois, where she was reared and educated 
and where she completed a course in Almira College of that city. A 
woman of culture and gracious personality, she continues to occupy a 
secure place in connection with the representative social and religious 
activities of Fort Wayne, where she is a devoted member of the First 
Presbyterian church. With her in the beautiful home remain her three 
children — Catherine Reid, Edward A. K., Jr., and Wayne. Mrs. Hackett 



254 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

is a daughter of Colonel John B and Emma T. (Holden) Reid, long num- 
bered among the most honored residents of Greenville, Illinois, her father 
having gained his military title through gallant service as a soldier and 
officer on the Union side during the Civil War. 

Alva 0. Hadley. — A model farm is, in the opinion of those v^^ho have 
seen the Hadley farm in Section 30, lyiarion township, one that conforms 
to the standards of that place. Mr. Hadley has one of the finest and 
best-kept stock farms in Allen county, and he is known widely among 
the breeders of blooded Belgian horses, Holstein cattle and Duroc-Jersey 
hogs as one of the most progressive and successful men in the business. 
The buildings on the farm are the last word in point of convenience 
and sanitation, and reflect the progressiveness and capability of the owner 
of the place. Alva 0. Hadley was born June 30, 1862, in Clermont county, 
Ohio, and is the son of Parley P. and Martha H. (Snell) Hadley. The 
father was of English parentage and the mother came of Pennsylvania 
Dutch blood. In 1869, Parley Hadley went to Crawford county, Kansas, 
and settled on a tract of land of one hundred and sixty acres. He 
applied himself to farming operations, adding another quarter-section in 
time, and conducted a very successful cattle business for a good many 
years. He was a carpenter by trade, but spent more time in agricultural 
pursuits than in devotion to his trade, and was considered a very success- 
ful man, well-to-do for his day. He was a veteran of the Civil War and 
his service covered the entire period of hostilities. He enlisted v^^hen 
the first call for troops came and was discharged after the surrender, 
in the spring of 1865. He was with Sherman on the March to the Sea 
and participated in many of the bloodiest battles of the war. He arose 
during his service from the rank of private to that of Captain. Mrs. 
Hadley died in March, 1882, and in 1890 Mr. Hadley returned to Ohio, 
where he spent the remaining years of his life in quiet retirement. He 
died in September, 1908. After the death of the subject's mother, Mr. 
Hadley married again, Martha Engle becoming his wife, and two children 
were born to them. Mabel married Joseph Carr and Harrison died in 
April, 1909. The children of the first marriage were six in number and 
mention of them is made briefly as follows: Elizah Ann is the wife of 
George Cunningham, of Kansas. Alva 0., the subject of this review, 
was the second child. Amanda Bell died when she was eighteen years 
of age. George died in childhood. Ida passed away in 1909. John is 
living in Fort Wayne, and is connected prominently with the Fort Wayne 
Dairy Company. Alva Hadley was a small boy when the family moved 
to Kansas and he had his early education in the schools of the Sunflower 
State. He lived on his father's farm to the age of twenty-one, when 
he branched out for himself on a rented farm. In 1894 he bought his 
first land. It was a small farm of seventy-two acres, which he sold 
some time later and bought his present farm of eighty acres in Section 
30, Marion township, Allen county. All his life he has given his attention 
to the production of blooded stock, and his Belgian mares and stallions 
are among the finest to be found in the state. Mr. Hadley is Repub- 
lican in politics and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His 
fraternal affiliations are with the Masons and he and his wife are affil- 
iated with the Eastern Star. He is also a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He was married on July 1, 1883, to Miss Euphemia 
Davidson, daughter of Anderson Davidson, of Scotland, and Anna B. 
(Miller) Davidson. The father was of Scotch parentage. He died young 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 255 

in years and his widow moved from Ohio to Wells county, Indiana, bring- 
ing her five children with her. They were : Rosa, Avife of J. W. Snider, 
living in P'ort Wayne at this writing ; Elizabeth, the wife of L. Springer, 
of Fort Wayne ; Simon, who died in Fort Wayne February 12, 1916 ; 
Ella, who died in Kansas; and Euphemia, the wife of Mr. Hadley. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hadley are the parents of four children — Guy, Gladys, May, 
Ray and Adoniram W. Guy is located in Marion township, and the two 
younger children are at home with the parents. Ray P. married Ermal, 
daughter of William Comer, of Pleasant township. 

Arthur L. Hadley. — Among the men who have given long service 
with the Fort Wayne plant of the General Electric Company and who 
have contributed of their intelligent efforts toward the advancement of 
electrical knowledge and the practical application of their studies, is 
Arthur L. Hadley, chief engineer of the great institution in Fort Wayne. 
Mr. Hadley has been connected with the works in this city since 1889 
and has contributed much to the development of the big plant and its 
output — which have made the name of Fort Wayne known in all quarters 
of the civilized world. Mr. Hadley was born in Templeton, Massachu- 
setts, October 19, 1867, and is a son of Lucien N. and Jeanette (Bourn) 
Hadley, the former a native of Canaan, New Hampshire, and the latter 
of Templeton, Massachusetts. Lucien N. Hadley was a successful furni- 
ture manufacturer and lumber dealer. Arthur L. Hadley continued to 
attend the public schools of Templeton until his graduation in the high 
school, as a member of the class of 1885, and then, following a natural 
inclination, he entered upon a period of study in the Worcester Poly- 
technical Institute at Worcester, Massachusetts. There he took a course 
in mechanical engineering that opened a way for special attention to 
matters electrical — a field of study and experimentation that particularly 
appealed to him. He was graduated in the institute as a member of 
the class of 1889 and with the degree of Bachelor of Science. After 
leaving school there was afforded to him the opportunity of spending 
a few months in the electric-lighting plant at Gardner, Massachusetts, 
and there his privileges for the further study of electrical matters devel- 
oped in him the determination to devote his future studies to this line. 
In Fort Wayne at that time was established the Fort Wayne Electric 
Light Company, the forerunner of the present immense plant of the 
General Electric Company. Men of the type of Mr. Hadley were required 
for the development of the business, and he came to Fort Wayne Novem- 
ber 11, 1889, to take charge of the transformer-testing department. He 
gave his attention to development work, ever seeking new and improved 
ways of applying principles which the electrical field constantly pro- 
vides for men of peculiar ability. These efforts were begun on electric 
storage batteries, under the general supervision of M. M. M. Slattery. 
Then, in the departments headed by C. S. Bradley and F. S. Hunting, 
he engaged in experimental work on three-phase motors, with marked 
success. He served for a period as the assistant to James J. Wood, in 
designing transformers and alternating-current and direct-current ma- 
chines. In many lines of experimental and development work Mr. Hadley 
has added much to the success of the products of the General Electric 
plant in Fort Wayne. He now has charge of the apparatus-engineering 
department, which includes the designing of all alternating-current and 
direct-current generators and also all direct-current motors except those 
of the small-motor department of the works. Mr. Hadley is an active 



256 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. He is a mem- 
ber of the Fort Wayne Electro-Technic Club, the Mutual Benefit Relief 
Association of the great electric works, the Fort Wayne Commercial 
Club and the University Club. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and 
a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is a loyal member of Plymouth Con- 
gregational church. In 1895 Mr. Hadley wedded Miss Nellie M. Richey, 
daughter of Amos Richey, of Fort Wayne, and the three children of 
this "union are Gladys, Norman and Elizabeth, all of whom are members 
of the family circle at the parental home, on South Hoagland avenue. 

Robert Hadley. — Though he died within about three years after estab- 
lishing his residence in the city of Fort Wayne the late Robert Hadley 
made a definite impression on this community both through his sterling 
personality and distinctive business ability. He was the founder of the 
prosperous retail furniture business that is still conducted under the 
title of Hadley & Company and in which his interests are now held 
by his widow. Mr. Hadley was born in the fine old city of Lexington, 
Kentucky, on July 4, 1870, and was a scion of fine old southern ancestry. 
He acquired his youthful education in the schools of his native city 
and after completing the curriculum of the high school he there became 
actively identified with the retail furniture business. Later he was 
connected with similar enterprise in St. Louis, Missouri, and Indianapolis, 
Indiana, from which latter city he removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
His next change of residence was made in his removal to Toledo, Ohio, 
and from that city he came to Fort Wayne in 1912, in which year he 
became the organizer of the firm of Hadley & Company and opened 
one of the really metropolitan furniture stores of this part of the Hoosier 
state. To the management of this business he continued to give his close 
attention until his untimely death, May 1, 1915, about two months prior 
to the forty-fifth anniversary of his birth. Mr. Hadley was an alert 
and progressive business man and his genial personality gained to him 
the staunch friendship of those with whom he came in contact in the 
various relations of life. His political allegiance was given to the Repub- 
lican party and he was affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose. On February 6, 1902, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hadley to Miss Kate Opergfell, who 
was born and reared in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, the younger in 
a family of two children, her brother, George, being still a resident of 
St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley became the parents of four children, 
all of whom survive the honored father and remain with their widowed 
mother in Fort Wayne, their names being here entered in the respective 
order of their birth: Edwin Charles, Adele Helen, Robert Harold, and 
Virginia Jane. 

George M. Haffner is now the executive head and general manager 
of one of the important pioneer business enterprises in the city of Fort 
Wayne, and as president of the Haffner Star Bakery he is the virtual 
successor of his honored father, who founded the business more than 
half a century ago. In all the years that have passed since the enter- 
prise was initiated in a comparatively modest way, the Haffner estab- 
lishment has been maintained at the highest standard consonant with 
conditions and demands, and the Haffner Star Bakery of the present 
day is thoroughly metropolitan in all of its facilities, in the grade of 
its products and in careful and progressive management. Christian Haff- 
ner, whose portrait appears herewith, was the founder of the extensive 



ASTC; , 
TILDEN F 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 257 

business now controlled by the Haffner Star Bakery and the father of 
the present president of the company conducting the enterprise. He was 
born at Marbach, Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, on August 19, 
1835, and his death occurred at his home in Fort Wayne, April 29, 1893, 
so that he was fifty-seven years of age when he was summoned from 
the stage of life's mortal endeavors. He was afforded the advantages 
of the schools of his native land and was twenty years of age when he 
came to the United States, in 1855. After tarrying a few weeks in the 
city of Philadelphia he made his way to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he found 
employment at his trade, that of baker. When the Civil War was pre- 
cipitated he promptly showed his loyalty to the land, of his adoption, as 
he was among the first to enlist in response to President Lincoln's call 
for volunteers. He enrolled himself as a private in the Ninth Ohio 
Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front and with which he con- 
tinued in active service three months. Severe illness then incapacitated 
him for further active service in the field, but it was a matter of deep 
satisfaction to him that he was able to bring his trade into play and to 
continue his service to the nation by acting as baker for his Government. 
In 1865, about the time of the close of the war, Christian Haffner came 
to Fort Wayne and purchased a half interest in the Wolroff bakery, 
which was situated on East Main street, opposite the present No. 1 fire- 
department station. Finally he purchased Mr. Wolroff 's interest in the 
business and later admitted C. W. Jacobs to partnership in the same. 
This alliance continued until 1869, when the partnership was dissolved 
and Mr. Haffner built a new bakery plant at the corner of Harrison 
and Berry streets. There he continued successful operations about twenty 
years, and, in 1890, about three years prior to his death, he found the 
establishment inadequate to meet the demands placed upon it by the 
constantly expanding trade, and accordingly showed his enterprise and 
good judgment by removing to the building now occupied by the Haffner 
Star Bakery, at 333-5 East Lewis street, where he was able to install a 
larger and more improved equipment and where he continued at the 
head of the more prosperous business until his death. Thereafter his 
widow continued the business, which was placed under the direct and 
effective management of their son, George M., and under these conditions 
the enterprise was conducted until June 1, 1900, when George M. assumed 
a definite partnership relation. On September 1, 1914, as a matter of 
commercial expediency, the business was incorporated under the title 
of the Haffner Star Bakery, and with a capital stock of fifty thousand 
dollars, all of which is retained by members of the Haffner family, the 
widow of the honored founder being vice-president of the company. 
George M., the eldest son, is president, treasurer and manager, Clarence 
M. and Frederick C, younger sons, are stockholders and directors of the 
company, and the former holds the office of secretary of the same. The 
finely equipped plant has the best of facilities in both the bread and 
cake departments, and the fullest assortment of modern bakery goods 
is at all times available in supplying the large wholesale and retail trade 
of the concern, they being the pioneer leaders of the famous ten-cent 
"Hol-Tayto-Loaf " bread. The progressive policies of the company are 
indicated in preparations to double the capacity of the plant within the 
near future. In the establishment employment is given to about thirty 
persons, an appreciable trade is controlled in the wholesale line in the 
territory normally tributary to Fort Wayne, and the business of the 



258 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

company, in 1916, aggregated over one hundred and twenty thousand 
dollars. The establishment maintains and supplies six distinct city routes 
in Fort Wayne, with automobile delivery facilities, including an electric 
truck. Christian Haffner was known and honored as a man of sterling 
character, of marked business energy and capacity and of utmost civic 
loyalty. His political allegiance was given to the Republican party, he 
was a member of the Lutheran church, and he was affiliated with Con- 
cordia Lodge No. 228, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, In December, 
1867, Mr. Haffner wedded Miss Mary Feist, of Columbia City, Indiana, 
and concerning the children of this union the following brief record is 
entered: Herman died in childhood; Emma died at the age of forty-six 
years on November 10, 1914; George M. is the immediate subject of this 
review ; Frederick C. is a director of the Haffner Star Bakery ; Edward J. 
is deceased; Rose M. is the wife of John F. Wagner, of Fort Wayne; 
Arthur C. L. is a resident of the city of Chicago; and Clarence M. is 
secretary of the corporation. George M. Haffner was born in Fort 
Wayne on March 7, 1870, and he acquired his early education in the 
public, Reformed Lutheran and Catholic parochial schools of his native 
city. As a boy he began to assist in his father's bakery, and his experi- 
ence continued until he had served a most thorough apprenticeship under 
the discriminating and careful direction of his father. That he has been 
dominated by ambition to learn the baking business in every detail and 
to fortify himself in scientific knowledge pertinent thereto is shown by 
his having taken a course in a well-conducted technical baking institute 
in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and also a course of pertinent 
lectures delivered by members of the faculty of Purdue College, at 
Lafayette, Indiana, where also he attended the conference called for 
th purpose of founding a technical baking school in connection with 
the institution. In the administration of the affairs of the company of 
which he is president Mr. Haffner has shown not only a thorough tech- 
nical knowledge of the business but also much initiative and executive 
ability, as well as the progressiveness that makes for the achievement of 
large and better results. He takes loyal interest in all things touching 
the welfare and advancement of his native city, is a Democrat in his 
political proclivities, is a member of the board of directors of the Fort 
Wayne Commercial Club, has served as president of the Fort Wayne 
Retail Merchants' Association, is a prominent member of the Indiana 
Master Bakers' Association, of which he has been president two terms, 
and is identified also with the national association of master bakers, of 
which he also served one year as president. He holds membership in the 
Rotary Club, has given service as president of St. Aloysius Young Men's 
Society and was for three years president of St. Charles-Baromeo Relief 
Society. He is an active member of St. Mary's Athletic Club and is 
captain of the bowling team of the same. Both he and his wife are 
earnest communicants of St. Mary's parish of the Catholic church. On 
October 12, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Haffner to Miss 
Helen Catherine Noll, daughter of Benedict R. Noll, of Fort Wayne, 
and of the seven children of this union all are living except the fourth, 
Helen, who died in infancy. The surviving children of the ideal home 
circle are Rozella, Bernadette, Herman G., Eugene, Alma and Florence. 

Arthur Fletcher Hall. — Few men who have come to Fort Wayne 
within the period of recent years have entered so enthusiastically and 
effectively into the varied activities of the city as has Arthur Fletcher 




CHRISTIAN HAFFNER 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 259 

Hall, vice-president and general manager of the Lincoln National Life 
Insurance Company. Without a suggestion of selfish interest and with 
the enthusiasm of one who finds his highest enjoyment in true service, 
Mr. Hall has given much to Fort Wayne that is of permanent good, for 
he is interested actively in every project which suggests true municipal 
and social progress. He was born in Baxter Springs, Kansas, on May 
11, 1872, the son of Truman and Harriet (Beeler) Hall. The father 
died there and the family returned to the mother's home, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Here, Arthur F. Hall received his educational training in the 
common and high schools. At the age of seventeen, upon the completion 
of his high school course, he entered the employment of the Indianapolis 
Journal, then one of the leading newspapers of the middle west, and 
continued with the institution for a period of fifteen years, during which 
time, through his keenness of perception of the possibilities of the work 
entrusted to him, he occupied every position in the business department 
of the publication. The training he received here, and which continued 
at the time he was serving as assistant business manager in 1904, when 
the property was purchased by new interests, laid the foundation upon 
which was built his later success. Leaving the business department of 
the Journal, Mr. Hall entered the agency ranks of the Equitable Life 
Assurance Society of New York. In 1905 Mr. Hall determined to make 
a greater place for himself in the insurance world. He came to Fort 
Wayne and, through his ability to convince men of his thorough equip- 
ment to organize a great life insurance company, he at once entered 
upon the plans which resulted in making Fort Wayne the home of the 
widely-known Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, now grown 
to a proud place in the insurance world. Early in its history the * ' Insur- 
ance Pross" said, "The future of the Lincoln Life is in the hands of 
men who know how." The years have proven the wisdom of the state- 
ment — and Arthur F. Hall has been the guiding spirit of the great 
institution's upward progress. From the beginning, Mr. Hall has served 
as the general manager, as well as the vice-president of the institution. 
His important work with the Lincoln Life, however, has not absorbed 
all his energies. His well-ordered mind fits him to give attention not 
only to the important activities of the city but to its pleasures as well. 
He is busy in Masonic circles. As a member of the Blue Lodge, the 
Scottish Rite and the York Rite, he has helped to make the order a 
greater power for good. While serving as potentate of Mizpah Temple, 
A. A. 0. N, Mystic Shrine, he added greatly to the popularity of the 
order in Fort Wayne. His interests are suggested also in his membership 
in the Rotary Club, the Commercial Club and the Quest Club, of Fort 
Wayne, and the Columbia Club, of Indianapolis. He is an active member 
of the Fort Wayne Country Club, of which organization he has served 
as president. He is a member of the Trinity Episcopal church, of which 
body he has served as vestryman. His interest in financial affairs is 
suggested by his connection with the German-American National bank 
and the Morris Plan bank as a director. In politics he is a Republican. 
During the memorable campaign to raise a fund of $300,000 for the 
erection of a building for the Young Men's Christian Association, Mr. 
Hall served as the captain of one of two sections which succeeded in 
raising forty thousand dollars in excess of the designated goal. In June, 
1898, Mr. Hall was united in marriage with Miss Una Fletcher, daughter 
of Dr. William B. and Agnes (O'Brien) Fletcher, of Indianapolis. To 



260 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

them have been born three children : Arthur F. Hall, Jr., 1902 ; William 
Fletcher Hall, 1905, and Aileen Hall, 1913. This family occupies "Beech- 
wood," one of the most attractive of the south side homes in Fort Wayne. 

Chester I. Hall. — The profession of electrical engineering has an 
able and popular young representative in Fort Wayne in the person 
of Chester Irving Hall, who here holds a responsible position with the 
General Electric Company. Mr. Hall claims the Sunflower State as the 
place of his nativity, he having been born in the city of Topeka, Kansas. 
He is a son of Irving and Ella Carrie (Martin) Hall, both of whom were 
born at Grand Rapids, Mich., where the respective families settled in 
the pioneer days. The Hall family was founded in New England in 
the colonial era of American history, and Elias Hall, grandfather of the 
subject of this review, was born in the state of Massachusetts, and he 
settled in Michigan many years ago, the remainder of his life having 
been passed in that state. Irving Hall devoted the major part of his 
active business career to retail merchandizing and was a resident of 
Chicago, Illinois, at the time of his death, in 1905, his wife and daughter 
now being residents of Chicago. Chester I. Hall acquired his preliminary 
education in the public schools and his technical training in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, in which he prepared himself for his present profession, 
that of electrical engineer. He did his initiative professional work in 
the city of Chicago and has been a resident of Fort Wayne since 1913. 
At Benton Harbor, Michigan, in 1912, was solemnized his marriage to 
Miss Lillian Mess, who was born in the city of Chicago, and the two 
children of this union are John Irving, born at High Lake, Illinois, 
in 1913, and Warren Chester, born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1916. 

Allen Hamilton, who is now serving with loyal efficiency as township 
trustee of Wayne township and who thus has an important part in 
directing the governmental affairs of the city of Fort Wayne also, has 
been a resident of Allen county from the time of his birth and is a 
representative of a family whose name has been worthily linked with 
the history of this county for an approximate period of seventy years, 
so that upon him rests a modicum of ancestral pioneer honors, this 
likewise being true in the maternal line. Mr. Hamilton was born in 
the village of Leo, Cedar Creek township, this county, on July 14, 1848, 
and is a son of James Montgomery Hamilton and Johanna (Brecken- 
ridge) Hamilton, the. former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter 
at Brookville, Franklin county, Indiana, where her parents were pioneer 
settlers. James M. Hamilton was born in the year 1822 and acquired 
his elementary education in his native land. He was a lad of twelve 
years when he accompanied his parents to the United States, in 1834, 
and he became one of the pioneer exponents of agricultural industry 
in Allen county, Indiana, where he established his home when still a 
young man. He was engaged in farming in Washington township at 
the time of his death, in 1864, and was one of the highly esteemed men 
of that section of Allen county, his political support having been given 
to the Republican party and both he and his wife having been earnest 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Hamilton survived 
the husband of her youth by nearly half a century and was eighty-six 
years of age at the time of her death, in 1913, she having been one of 
the venerable and revered pioneer women of Allen county. Allen Ham- 
ilton acquired his early education in the common schools of Washington 
township and later attended the Jefferson school in Fort Wayne, as did 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 261 

he also the Methodist College for a short interval. He was a youth 
of sixteen years at the time of his father's death and he remained with 
his mother on the old homestead farm, in Washington township, until 
1870, when he entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of machinist, 
in the Fort Wayne shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He became 
a specially skilled artisan and continued in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company for nearly half a century, virtually all of his 
service having been in the Fort Wayne shops, and his final retirement, 
after an association of forty-six years, having occurred August 19, 1916. 
Mr. Hamilton has been influential in public affairs in his home city and 
county for many years and has been a zealous and loyal advocate of the 
principles of the Democratic party. He is now serving as trustee of 
Wajme township, to which office he was appointed, August 18, 1916, 
and he has served also as a member of the county council, as a member 
of the municipal council of Fort Wayne, in which latter body he repre- 
sented the Second ward, and for six years he was a member of the 
Fort Wayne board of education. In each of these positions of public 
trust his course has been directed with a high sense of stewardship and 
with a constant desire to conserve and advance the best interests of 
the community. He is now nearing the scriptural span of three score 
years and ten, but his mental and physical powers have not appreciably 
signalized the passing of the years, his sane and industrious life having 
been such as to leave him hale and strong as the shadows begin to 
lengthen from the crimson west. Mr. Hamilton has been in active affil- 
iation with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1873 and he 
is one of the well-known and unequivocally popular native sons of Allen 
county. On September 2, 1875, wa ssolemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hamilton to Miss Cecilia Fink, daughter of the late Charles and Elizabeth 
Fink, of Fort Wayne. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton have four children: 
James M. is now a resident of the city of Cleveland, Ohio ; Walter G. and 
Frank G. still reside in Fort Wayne; and Edmund C. is a resident of 
the city of Chicago. 

Oliver S. Hanna. — A representative of one of the oldest and most 
prominent of the permanent families of Fort Wayne, Oliver S. Hanna 
has remained an active factor in the commercial and financial circles 
of the city through a period marked by a wonderful physical develop- 
ment in his native place. Mr. Hanna was born in Fort Wayne, August 
12, 1847, the son of James B. and Mary King (Fairfield) Hanna. James 
B. Hanna was the oldest son of Judge Samuel Hanna — admittedly Fort 
Wayne's foremost citizen of all times — and Eliza Taylor Hanna. He 
was born in Fort Wayne, June 11, 1823. For several years in the pioneer 
days of the village Judge Samuel Hanna and James B. Hanna, under 
the firm name of S. Hanna and Son, were engaged in mercantile trade 
here. James B. Hanna died in 1851, at the age of twenty-eight years. 
The wife of James B. Hanna was born September 8, 1823, at Kenne- 
bunkport, Maine, a descendant from two prominent families of the 
"Pine Tree" state, the Fairfields and the Kings. To James B. Hanna 
and wife were born three children: Clara L. (Mrs. W. L. Carnahan, 
of Fort Wayne), Oliver S. and James T., the latter deceased. Oliver S. 
Hanna was educated in the public schools of Fort Wayne and later at 
Stamford, Connecticut, and Poughkeepsie, New York, On December 4, 
1878, he was united in marriage with Mary Ella Nuttman. To this union 
two children have been born: Gertrude King, now Mrs. Asa W. Gros- 



262 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

venor, of Fort Wayne, and Julia N., now Mrs, Creighton H. Williams, 
of Fort Wayne. The commercial career of Mr. Hanna was begun in 
the First National Bank of Fort Wayne, of which institution he became 
a director. Later, he entered the wholesale boot and shoe house of 
Carnahan, Hanna & Company. Afterward, he organized the wholesale 
dry goods and notion house of Hanna, Wiler & Company. In 1882 
Mr. Hanna entered into co-partnership with James D. Nuttman in the 
establishment of the banking institution of Nuttman & Company, the 
presidency of which he has held during a period of years. Mr. Hanna 
is a Republican in politics, though he has not entered actively into polit- 
ical affairs. He is a member of the congregation of the First Presby- 
terian church. He is a member of Mizpah Temple, A. A. 0. N., Mystic 
Shrine, having taken both York and Scottish Rite degrees. He is a loyal 
member of the Commercial Club of Fort Wayne. 

Hon. Robert Blair Hanna is of the third generation of the Hanna 
family of Fort Wayne, and it would indeed be difficult to write a history 
of Fort Wayne without writing a large portion of the history of that 
branch of the Hanna family. He was born on his father's farm, located 
on the east bank of the St. Mary's river in Washington township, Allen 
county, Indiana. His father was Henry Clay Hanna, a son of Samuel 
Hanna, whose history is recorded elsewhere in this work. His mother 
was a daughter of AVilliam W. Carson, born in Castel Bar, Ireland, then 
moved to Crossinalina, where he served as a military officer of high rank, 
then immigrated to Cobourg, Canada, with his family, where he followed 
farming and where Elizabeth Catharine Carson was born. After the 
death of her father, she and her mother came to Fort Wayne to live with 
her brother, William W., who as town attorney drafted Fort Wayne's 
first city charter, served as a Democratic member of the Indiana legisla- 
ture and as judge of the common pleas court of Allen county. Her's was 
a family poor in purse but rich in culture, and she was indeed a woman of 
unusually fine social qualities and a most devoted daughter, wife and 
mother. Robert's parents were married October 25, 1854, in the little 
brick house still situated near the northeast corner of Barr and Berry 
streets. To their union were born eight children : Samuel Carson Hanna, 
born December 18, 1855, died December 31, 1855 ; Joseph Thomas Hanna, 
born February 18, 1857; Henry Clay Hanna, Jr., born June 11, 1858; 
Minnie Eliza Hanna, born April 18, 1862, died December 13, 1871 ; Char- 
lotte Hanna, born August 16, 1864, died February 20, 1884 ; Annie Louise 
Hanna, born January 19, 1866, died September 15, 1893 ; Robert Blair 
Hanna, born March 25, 1868; and Elizabeth Catharine Hanna, born De- 
cember 31, 1870, died December 15, 1872. The father died July 25, 1881, 
at the age of fifty-two years, five months and seven days, and the mother 
died September 8, 1916, at the age of eighty-seven years, five months and 
twenty days. For the first seven years of his school life, R. B. Hanna 
attended the German-Lutheran school on Barr street ; then the public 
grade and high schools and the Fort Wayne Business College. After 
reading law for three years in the office of his brother, Henry C. Hanna, 
and being admitted to the bar in 1890, he formed a partnership with his 
brother and was with him for several years, and then alone he continued 
successfully in the practice of law until being appointed postmaster in 
1906. Public affairs attracted "Bob" Hanna early and in 1892 he was 
elected to the city council as a Republican candidate by a majority of 
62 from the then first ward, which was strongly Democratic. He was 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 263 

largely, instrumental in establishing many municipal improvements and 
civic policies, including garbage collection and crematory system; estab- 
lishment of a fund for a suitable covered market to be erected on the 
space donated to the city for that purpose by his Grandfather Hanna; 
leasing the life estate reserved to his heirs by Col. Swinney when he willed 
to Fort Wayne what is today Swinney park ; building the lake and beau- 
tifying the grounds around the reservoir, now known as Reservoir park; 
starting the Anthony Wayne monument fund, and on July 25, 1893, he 
introduced the resolution which looked to securing for the people interest 
on the school funds, which was finally accomplished upon the election 
of Samuel M. Foster to the school board. While only twenty-four years 
old, and politically a minority member, he was made a member of the 
councilmanic commission which controlled the police and fire depart- 
ments. Shortly before the close of his term, the council was called upon 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mayor Charles A. Zollinger; 
politically the council stood 12 Democrats, 8 Republicans, and the final 
ballot stood 12 for Henry P. Scherer and 8 for R. B. Hanna. In 1898, he 
was nominated, in his absence and against his wishes, a candidate for 
state senator on the Republican ticket in the Democratic county of Allen. 
He ran 1,500 ahead of others on his ticket, carrying the Democratic city 
of Fort Wayne but losing the county by 900. During the campaign he 
advocated placing justices of the peace on a salary instead of allowing 
them fees, and at the session of the legislature, two years later, he secured 
the passage of the bill he had framed reducing the number of justices 
of the peace for Fort Wayne and placing them on a salary. He was one 
of the organizers of the Fort Wayne club in 1892 (afterwards the Anthony 
Wayne club), and of The Fort Wayne Commercial club in 1899, and a 
director in each for several years before and after their consolidation 
into the present Commercial Club of Fort Wayne. He was secretary of 
the Fort Wayne Commercial club for five years. The bringing of fac- 
tories and interurban electric roads to Fort Wayne; the arbitration and 
satisfactory adjustment of the long disputed gas question; the elevation 
of the railroad tracks ; and the building of the Anthony hotel were among 
the many questions with which the club successfully dealt during Mr. 
Hanna 's term as secretary, and the famous " Made-in-Fort-Wayne Expo- 
sition" given during that time was his idea. Mr. Hanna was appointed 
postmaster of Fort Wayne January 18, 1906, and he was re-appointed 
May 1, 1911. He devoted all of his time to his official duties and at the 
time he re-appointed him, President Taft said that his record was one 
of the very best in the whole United States. Upon retiring as postmaster 
he was given a surprise banquet and presented with a diamond ring by 
the postoffice employees — the ring being of Masonic design as Mr. Hanna 
is a member of Sol D. Bayless Lodge No. 359 F. and A. M. and a Scottish 
Rite Mason of the thirty-second degree. Truthfully, indeed, has it been 
said that "Wherever the spirit of civic patriotism breathes in Fort Wayne 
'Bob' Hanna is sure to be found," for no sooner had he resigned as 
secretary of the Commercial club than he found himself in the non- 
salaried position of secretary of the Fort Wayne Civic Lnprovement 
Association, an organization then recently promoted by the Commercial 
club. The activities of this association resulted in a community-wide civic 
awakening, a civic revival, in which practically every organization of 
men and women in the city took part, and the civic pride of the people 
was stirred as never before. Mr. Hanna is a student of community prob- 



264 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

lems, and the vast amount of civic, community and public welfare work 
which he has done in Fort Wayne during the past twenty years can 
only be suggested here. He is now giving of his time and talents as a 
member of the Allen county Liberty Loan executive committee ; the Fort 
Wayne Red Cross subscription committee ; chairman of the Rotary club 
intensive farming and city lot gardening committee, and in many other 
ways and along still other patriotic lines. As a public speaker, Mr, Hanna 
is much in demand at Republican political meetings, community gather- 
ings and business and professional men's meetings and banquets, both 
in Fort Wayne and in nearby cities and towns. He is engaged in busi- 
ness, with an office at 919 Shoaff building, under the title of realty engi- 
neering, the nature of which brings into play his legal training, his ability 
to plan and organize and promote, his knowledge of modern city plan- 
ning, particularly as it relates to laying out new additions to the city. 
One of the adjuncts to his business is his connection with the Bedford 
Stone & Construction Co., which is one of the largest building companies 
in the country. Robert Blair Hanna and Eva Theodosia Nelson were 
married in Trinity church. Fort Wayne, February 2, 1906. Her father 
was Amos DeGroff Nelson, former sheriff of Allen county, a son of Isaac 
DeGroff Nelson, commissioner of statehouse construction at Indianapolis 
and president of Lindenwood cemetery association, in which stands a 
handsome monument erected to his memory by that association. DeGroff 
was a brother of the late William R. Nelson, owner and editor of the 
Kansas City Star; DeGroff Nelson's mother was Elizabeth Rockhill, a 
daughter of William Rockhill, who was a representative in the United 
States congress. Mrs. Hanna 's mother was Helen Catharine, daughter 
of Samuel Edsall, at one time elected to the Indiana legislature from 
Allen county on the Democratic ticket and also a member of the state 
militia; her mother was Cynthia Harrison, who was a cousin of William 
Henry Harrison. To Mr. and Mrs. Hanna 's union has been born two 
children, Robert Blair, Jr., born January 19, 1907, and Agnes Taylor, born 
September 15, 1912, The family attends the Trinity Protestant Episcopal 
church. 

Samuel Hanna. — "Judge Hanna belonged to the higher type of the 
pioneer class of men. He was a planter and builder, more than a legis- 
lator. He had the hope, the courage, the forethought, the fertility of 
resource, the unfaltering purpose and will that characterize the planters 
of colonies and the founders of cities." So spoke the Hon, Joseph K. 
Edgerton on the 12th day of June, 1866, the day after the death of the 
man whose name stands above every other in the history of the city 
which bears the name of Fort Wayne, To one who knows not the story, 
it is held out as an example of all that makes for real, true usefulness 
in every phase of society and in every condition of men, Samuel Hanna 
was born October 18, 1797, in Scott county, Kentucky, just three years 
after General Wayne completed the building of the fort 'round which 
grew the village which developed into the modern city. His father, 
James Hanna, removed to Dayton, Ohio, in 1804, and purchased a farm 
lying just outside the town. Here Samuel assisted in clearing the land 
and laying the foundation for the family's future years of work and 
enjoyment of the home. The educational advantages were limited, but 
the boy was given every opportunity to attend the schools of the neigh- 
borhood. His earliest employment away from home was that of post- 
rider, delivering newspapers from the place of publication to the more 




-^graved 




n, — ^ 




■"» «— i H nf-r.— T. 






FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 265 

distant subscribers. His journey carried him to many points in western 
Ohio. This was before the postal delivery system was in contemplation 
in these sections. In his nineteenth year, Samuel Hanna occupied the 
position of clerk in a store in Piqua, Ohio. He and another young man, 
also a minor, bought out the proprietor, giving their notes for $3,000. 
Soon after these notes were transferred to an innocent purchaser. About 
the same time, the goods were taken from them by writ of attachment, 
leaving the young men without means and heavily in debt. Hanna 's 
partner soon relieved himself of liability by the plea of infancy. Not 
so, Samuel Hanna. Although his friends advised him in the same course, 
representing that he had been swindled, he nobly declined, declaring he 
would pay the last dollar of the debt. It was paid in full with interest. 
The incident is quoted to show the character of the man as manifested 
all through his eventful life. After teaching a country school for a time, 
he attended an Indian treaty council at St. Mary's Ohio, in the capacity 
of sutler — a person licensed to provide the representatives of the United 
States with supplies of various kinds — and, with his brother, Thomas, 
hauled the goods from Troy, Ohio. The small profits from this venture 
formed the foundation of his future fortune. His success in this direction 
also determined him upon the plan to locate at Fort Wayne, then a little 
village huddled about the old stockaded fort. He arrived in 1819, while 
in his twenty-second year, and just one year before the troops evacuated 
the fort. The place at that time was but an Indian trading post, with 
few white inhabitants. Immediately, he entered upon mercantile pursuits 
in a small way in partnership with his brother-in-law, James Barnett, in 
a log building located on a spot which is now described as the northwest 
corner of Barr and Columbia streets. The town had not yet been laid 
out, and the streets were merely the trails which had served the Indians 
and the soldiers for many years. By a course of fair dealing, first with 
his Indian customers and then with the whites, he acquired a high 
degree of regard and consideration on the part of the people among 
whom he lived so many years. From the moment he came to Fort 
Wayne, Samuel Hanna, at all times and on all occasions, evinced a strong 
desire to build up the town, to advance its material interests in every way, 
and to improve and develop the resources of the surrounding country, 
and though not inattentive to his own interests, the cardinal purpose was 
kept steadily in view during his whole life. In all meetings of the 
people for the promotion of the public welfare, he was always a con- 
spicuous and leading actor. He early conceived the indispensable neces- 
sity of opening and improving roads and other facilities for travel and 
inter-communication; but to fully appreciate his designs in this respect, 
it is necessary to revert to the condition of things at that time. The 
chief supply of provisions and almost every necessity of life had to be 
brought from a distance, mostly from Miami county, Ohio, by way 
of St. Mary's, being transported by wagon to the latter place and thence 
to Fort Wayne by flat-boats down the St. Mary's river. The difficulties 
attending the transportation of goods by these means is inconceivable 
in the present day. The facilities for obtaining goods for sale in the 
Hanna store were little or no better. They were, mostly, purchased in 
New York and Boston and brought up the Maumee in pirogues, a most 
laborious task, or packed through the wilderness from Detroit, on horses. 
Soon after locating in Fort Wayne, Samuel Hanna was appointed agent 
of the American Fur Company, a responsible position which he filled with 



/ 



266 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

credit. When Allen county was formed he was one of the two first 
associate judges of the Circuit Court. During these years he extended 
his trading operations to Lafayette and Wabash, Indiana, where he was 
connected with his brothers, Joseph and Hugh. He purchased large 
tracts of land in the Wabash valley. Students of the development of 
the plan to construct the Wabash and Erie canal unite in the declaration 
that while the idea of the waterway may have originated in the mind 
of the great Washington, it remained for Samuel Hanna to point out 
the practicability of the enterprise and to devote his energies to the 
completion of the work. It was while in familiar conversation with 
David Burr in a little summer house attached to the Hanna home that 
the canal subject appears to have assumed a definite shape. Hanna 
and Burr opened correspondence with the Indiana senators and repre- 
sentatives in congress and secured their favor and influence for the 
great undertaking. These efforts resulted, in 1827, in a grant by congress 
to the state of Indiana of each alternate section of land for six miles 
on each side of the proposed line, through its whole length, to aid in 
the construction of the canal. Against powerful opposition Judge Hanna, 
now elected to serve in the state legislature, fought the plan through. 
to success. The state first appropriated one thousand dollars to pur- 
chase the necessary surveying instruments and procured the survey and 
location of the summit level of the waterway. Judge Hanna was selected 
as a member of the canal commission. He went to New York, purchased 
the engineering instruments and returned by way of Detroit, from which 
place he rode on horseback. Judge Hanna and Mr. Burr surveyed the 
feeder canal to connect the waterway with the St. Joseph river. The 
legislature acted favorably on their report and the work was ordered 
continued to the end. Judge Hanna was fund commissioner for the 
canal for several years and negotiated for most of the money with which 
the work was carried on. Perhaps the wisdom and ability of Judge 
Hanna were never more strikingly displayed in any single act of his 
life than in the establishment and organization of the State Bank of 
Indiana. When the derangement of the currency and financial embar- 
rassment, consequent upon the veto of the United States Bank and other 
kindred measures occurred, he was a member of the state legislature. 
The president had recommended the creation of more state banks to 
supply the circulation, retired by the closing of that institution. Accord- 
ingly, a charter was introduced into the state legislature of such a char- 
acter that Judge Hanna and other judicious members thought it ought 
not to pass. He opposed its passage with great power and ability, and 
was principally instrumental in defeating it ; but it was clearly seen 
that a charter of some kind would pass the next session. A committee 
was appointed to prepare a proper charter during the vacation, to be 
presented when the legislature again convened. Judge Hanna was made 
chairman of the committee and to him was confided the duty of drafting 
the proposed new charter. It passed both houses with but little oppo- 
sition. Thus was created the State Bank of Indiana. A branch was at 
once established at Fort Wayne, of which Judge Hanna was president, 
much of the time, and Hon. Hugh McCulloch, cashier, during the whole 
time of its continuance. In 1836 Judge Hanna purchased the large 
remaining land interest of Barr and McCorkle, adjoining and surrounding 
the plat of Fort Wayne and comprising much of the most valuable down- 
town real estate of today. For several years he devoted himself to the 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 267 

Fort Wayne Branch bank, to the management and improvement of his 
estate, and to the enjoyment of his domestic and social relations; 
accepting, occasionally, a seat in the legislature. At this time the roads 
leading to Fort Wayne were in a wretched condition most of the time 
and their improvement became a matter of vital necessity. The plan 
of "planking," which had come into vogue in the east, was seized 
by Judge Hanna with avidity and acted upon with his accustomed prompt- 
ness and energy. Through his efforts the Fort Wayne and Lima Plank 
Road Company was formed and money borrowed chiefly from the Branch 
bank was used to construct the highway. The first attempt to let con- 
tracts proved a failure. In order to give the work a start Judge Hanna 
took the first ten miles north of Fort Wayne and went personally into 
the work, superintending, directing and with his own hands assisting 
in the most laborious operations. Others followed his example and the 
road was built within the two succeeding years, to Ontario, a distance 
of fifty miles from Fort AVayne. This was the first work of the kind 
ever undertaken in northern Indiana. Judge Hanna then took active 
part in the construction of the Piqua plank road and others. When 
the builders of the Pennsylvania & Ohio railroad reached the town 
of Crestline, in Ohio, and it was proposed to extend it to Fort Wayne 
under the name of the Ohio & Indiana railroad, Judge Hanna was ready 
with his powerful co-operation. He was largely instrumental in inducing 
the people of Allen county to vote a subscription of $100,000 to its 
capital stock. This was the turning point of the great enterprise. In 
1852, in connection with Pliny Hoagland and William Mitchell, he took 
the whole construction contract from Crestline to Fort Wayne, one 
hundred- and thirty-two miles, and entered immediately upon the pros- 
ecution of the work. The funds of the company became exhausted. 
Doctor Merriman, president of the road, resigned, disheartened. Judge 
Hanna was elected to succeed him. In three days he was in the eastern 
cities, pledging his individual credit and that of his coadjutors, Hoagland 
and Mitchell, for funds. This effected, he hastened without delay to 
Montreal and Quebec to redeem railroad iron that had been forfeited 
for non-payment of transportation charges. Work was resumed. In 
November, 1854, the ears from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia came rolling 
into Fort Wayne. In the autumn of 1852, while encumbered with the 
building and financial embarrassments of the Ohio & Indiana railroad, 
the Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad Company was organized and 
Judge Hanna was elected president. The financial difficulties of this 
road were also most burdensome, but the greater the pressure the greater 
Judge Hanna 's resources appeared to develop and come to his rescue. 
Judge Hanna effected the consolidation of the three properties which 
formed the beginning of the great Pennsylvania Railroad system of today. 
The accomplishment of Judge Hanna is best understood from a review 
of the year's efforts. In the beginning it became apparent to many of 
the stockholders, as well as managers of the separate corporations extend- 
ing from Pittsburgh to Chicago, and which, in fact, for all practical 
and business purposes, formed but one line, that the interests and con- 
venience of each, as well as of the public, would be promoted by merging 
their separate existence into one great consolidated company. Judge 
Hanna early and earnestly espoused the cause of consolidation, and a 
meeting was called at Fort Wayne to consider and act upon the subject. 
Contrary to expectation, considerable opposition to the projected consol- 



268 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

idation manifested itself at this meeting, headed and managed by the 
shrewd and talented Charles L. Boalt, encouraged and assisted by others 
hardly less astute. The debate was animated and exciting. The best 
talent on both sides was warmly enlisted. The contest extended to con- 
siderable length and its issue appeared doubtful. Before the debate 
closed Judge Hanna rose for a final appeal. No one who heard that 
brief effort will forget it. It was a condensed array of facts and argu- 
ments — a splendid outburst of burning, earnest eloquence. The oppo- 
sition was literally crushed out. The vote resulted in a large majority 
for consolidation — many who had opposed it in the beginning voting 
in its favor. Thus, on the first day of August, 1856, the three minor 
corporations were obliterated on terms satisfactory to themselves and 
the great Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railway Company suc- 
ceeded to their franchises and liabilities. While Judge Hanna, who was 
elected to serve as vice-president of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wajme & 
Chicago (Pennsylvania) railroad, would never yield an iota of the inter- 
ests of the company to any outside consideration, he was not unmindful 
of the interests of Fort Wayne. Hence his untiring efforts in establishing 
the immense railroad shops and manufactories of his city. Upon the 
organization of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, Judge 
Hanna was elected to serve as its president. He accepted with reluctance. 
He seemed to have a foreboding that his life's work was drawing to a 
close. When he was leaving his home to attend a meeting of the board 
of directors at Grand Rapids, less than two months before his demise,^ 
the remark was made that he would return president of the company. 
He replied, "No, that cannot be. The responsibility is too great ; I cannot 
accept it." He was elected, however. Judge Hanna 's efforts for the 
improvement of both town and country were not confined to those of 
a public nature, but his means were always freely advanced for the 
promotion of private and individual enterprise. In partnership with 
James Barnett he established the first grist mill on the St. Mary's river. 
The woolen factory of French, Hanna & Company, the extensive 
foundry and machine shops of Bass and Hanna (now the Bass Foundry 
and Machine Company's plant), the hub, spoke and bending factory 
of Olds, Hanna & Company, as well as many others, may be cited as 
instances of his wider interests. Many persons were essentially aided 
in their early efforts by the use of Judge Hanna 's capital. With the 
utmost charity and good-will towards all Christian denominations. Judge 
Hanna 's religious training was in the faith and spirit of the Presbyterian 
church of which his father was an elder for half a century. The organ- 
ization of the First Presbyterian church, in 1831, had his hearty co-oper- 
ation and support, though he did not become a member until 1843. He 
was then selected as a ruling elder, a position he held during the remain- 
der of his lifetime. The last illness of Judge Hanna was of short duration, 
covering only five days. His demise came on June 11, 1866. The city 
council passed resolutions of sorrow which found an echo in the heart 
of every citizen. The bells of all churches w^ere tolled and, amid sombre 
draperies on every side, a procession two miles in length followed his 
mortal remains to their last resting place in Lindenwood cemetery. Thus 
ended the pure and noble life of one whose name will ever be cherished 
by the citizens of Fort Wayne. March 7, 1822, at Fort Wayne, Judge 
Hanna was united in marriage with Miss Eliza Taylor, who was born 
in Buffalo, New York, in 1803, the daughter of Israel and Mary Taylor, 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 269 

natives of Massachusetts. She came to Fort "Wayne in 1820, from Dayton, 
Ohio, on a visit with her sister, Mrs. Laura Suttenfield. Mrs. Hanna 
possessed nobility of character, great personal courage and the ability 
to handle the affairs of home and society with ease. Although delicate 
in appearance, she possessed a strong constitution and was very active 
all her life. She died, February 12, 1888, at Fort Wayne in the Hanna 
homestead, still occupied by her daughter, Mrs. Fred J. Hayden. Fol- 
lowing are the children of Judge and Mrs. Hanna : Jesse Bayless, mem- 
ber of the firm of S. Hanna & Sons, general merchandise; Amos Thomas, 
also a member of this firm ; Henry Clay, at one time engaged in the 
grocery business and also a partner in the firm of N. G. and H. G. Olds 
and Company; Charles, a partner in the firm of French, Hanna & 
Company, manufacturers of woollen goods; Samuel Teford, associated 
with his father in the railroad business as private secretary while he 
was president of the Grand Rapids and Indiana road; Samuel T., a 
public-spirited citizen who served at one time as a member of the city 
council ; Horace Hovey, a partner of John H. Bass in the firm known as 
Bass & Hanna; William AVillis, a partner in the firm of French, Hanna 
and Company; Hugh Taylor, whose death occurred in 1915; and Eliza, 
the only daughter, the widow of Hon. Fred J. Hayden, the only sur- 
viving child of Judge and Mrs. Hanna. Mrs. Hayden retains the old 
homestead in the same manner as when her distinguished father and 
her respected mother welcomed and entertained their hosts of frinds 
in the years of the past. The air of hospitality and good fellowship is 
apparent today as in the yesterdays, and the fond memories of earlier 
years give to the splendid old mansion a value above that of the more 
common things which we call real treasures. 

Edward Happel is a scion of the second generation of the Happel 
family in Allen county, with whose industrial and civic affairs the family 
name has been identified for approximately seventy years. The parents 
of Mr. Happel established their home on a pioneer farm in Lake town- 
ship, this county, about the year 1848 ; the father reclaimed from a semi- 
wilderness a productive farm, and here he and his wife passed the re- 
mainder of their lives, sterling and industrious citizens who wrested from 
the hands of fate a due measure of prosperity and independence and at 
all times merited and commanded the confidence and respect of all who 
knew them. He whose name initiates this paragraph has not only upheld 
but expanded the prestige of the family name in connection with the 
basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing in his native county. 
He was born on the old homestead farm of his parents, in Lake township, 
and the date of his nativity was April 4, 1855. He is a son of Frederick 
and Henrietta (Bitting) Happel, both of whom were born and reared in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania — representatives of sterling old German fam- 
ilies that were early founded in the Keystone State. The parents of 
Mr. Happel were married in their native county and, as before stated, 
came to Allen county, Indiana, about the year 1848. Frederick Happel 
contributed his quota to the industrial and social development and prog- 
ress of the county, and both he and his wife attained to venerable age. 
Of their five children the eldest is Mrs. Catherine A. Anderson; and the 
second in order of birth is Mrs. Amanda Onick, both being still residents 
of Indiana; Minerva and Edward were twins and the former is now 
deceased, she having been the wife of George Blessing; and Mrs. Sylvia 
Draker is the youngest of the number. The parents were life-long and 



270 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

zealous communicants of the Lutheran church. The early educational ad- 
vantages of Edward Happel were limited to a somewhat irregular attend- 
ance in the rural schools of Lake township and he continued to be asso- 
ciated with the work and management of his father's farm until he finally 
purchased the property. He remained on the old homestead for three 
years after his marriage, which occurred in 1880, and then sold the prop- 
erty and purchased a farm of one hundred and eleven acres, eligibly 
situated on the Goshen road. Later he added forty-six acres to the area 
of his estate, which is situated in Sections 2 and 3, Lake township, and 
his energy and good judgment have been shown in the installing of many 
improvements on the place and in keeping the same up to a high modern 
standard. Eighty-eight acres are under a high state of cultivation and 
devoted to diversified agriculture, and Mr. Happel also gives attention 
to the raising of live stock, which he has made a profitable department 
of his farm enterprise. He is loyal and progressive as a citizen and has 
been influential in community afi'airs of a public order. The secure place 
which he holds in popular esteem is indicated by the fact that he served 
four years as township trustee of his native township. His political alleg- 
iance is given to the Republican party and both he and his wife are com- 
municants and active and valued members of St. John's Lutheran church 
in Lake township. On November 11, 1880, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Happel to Miss Louisa Lamley, who likewise was born and reared 
in this county, a daughter of the late Gottlieb and Margaret Lamley, of 
Lake township. Of Mr. and Mrs. Happel 's interesting family of children 
it is gratifying to note that all are living except the youngest, William, 
who died in infancy, and Katherine, the eldest, who was the wife of J. W. 
Rapp ; Rosa is the wife of George Felger, and they reside in Lake town- 
ship ; John is engaged in farming in Lake township ; Lavina is the wife of 
Ed Hagan, of Lake township ; Anna is the wife of Ed Blessing, of the 
same township ; Arthur remains at the parental home and assists in the 
management of the farm; Ruth is the wife of William Schmidt, of Lake 
township ; Dave is at home, and Lena and Jacob are also members of the 
gracious family circle of the parental home. 

Frank J. Harber was born in Pleasant township, Allen county, Indi- 
ana, on April 24, 1860, and his life thus far has been passed practically 
within the borders of his native community. He is the son of Nicholas 
and Margaret (Tracy) Harber, both of whom came from Germany as 
young people, and who settled in Allen county soon after their marriage. 
They were industrious young people and, desirous of owning land and 
a home of their own, entered land under the homestead laws, thus coming 
into ownership of one hundred and sixty acres of wild land in Pleasant 
township. Nicholas Harber had courage and young energy, and his wife 
was his equal in those sturdy qualities. They knew many hardships 
in those early years while they were making a farm out of that tract 
of wild land, and frugal living was the order of the day. For years 
the elder Harber was wont to tell, he saw little or no money, year in 
and out. They literally got their living from the soil. Salt, at one 
time during those years reached a record price of sixteen dollars a barrel, 
and he relates that they distilled salt from the black ash trees that grew 
abundantly on the land, and so supplied that ever present need without 
the outlay of actual money. Wild game abounded in the woods, and 
venison in those days was every man's legitimate food. Mr. Harber 
tells that he has sold venison in the villages for one cent a pound, and 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 271 

would sometimes get as much as fifty or seventy-five cents for the hide. 
The wild turkey, plentiful then, but now practically extinct, would bring 
twenty-five cents in the village market. It was by such means as these 
that the early settlers found a means to secure those necessities that 
could not be coaxed from the soil during the early years when they 
had not cleared enough land to enable them to farm in real earnest. 
Nicholas Harber had three brothers and two sisters, and with him they 
shared in the pioneer life of their day and contributed their full share 
to the development and upbuilding of the communities in which they 
settled. Mr. Harber 's success is a fair sample of what they were able 
to accomplish in their lifetimes. He added a good deal of land to his 
original holdings. First was a tract of a hundred and sixty acres, for 
which he paid the sum of $1.25 per acre. Later he secured a half section, 
so that his holdings aggregated one section, or 640 acres. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Harber were born five children : Martin, John H., Gerhard, George 
and Frank J., the last named being the immediate subject of this review. 
All were educated in the common schools of their community and in the 
parochial school, and they received better educational advantages than 
many of the youth of thei'r native community. Up to the age of twenty- 
six Frank Harber stayed on the home farm as his father's assistant. 
On the death of his father he inherited one hundred and eighty acres, 
and he has there carried on successful farming down to the present time. 
Modern and commodious dwelling and barns manifest the progressive 
character of Mr. Harber 's farming, and in addition to being one of 
the successful young farmers in the township he is identified somewhat 
prominently with business enterprises of the community. He has served 
as president of the local telephone company for five years, a concern 
in which he holds considerable stock, and is interested in a mining ven- 
ture in Nevada that promises well for future gains. Mr. Harber and 
his family are members of the Roman Catholic church, and he is Re- 
publican in his politics. He was married on May 25, 1886, to Miss Maggie 
Buff, daughter of Anthony and Susan (Reiniger) Buff who were early 
comers to Allen county from Pennsylvania. The day of wolves and 
Indians was in their time, and they shared in the privations and the 
pleasures that marked the lives of every pioneer of their period. Mr. 
Buff was a farmer, but he kept a tavern, as it was called then, for years. 
They were prominent and estimable people in their day, and their chil- 
dren have followed them in the worthy ambitions they manifested. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harber have four children and one grandchild. Callistus, the 
eldest, is married and has a daughter, Thelma. The others are Dorothy, 
Ethel and John G., all living at home. 

Martin Harber. — The Harber family is of German ancestry and the 
parents of Martin Harber came from Germany in their young life. They 
were Nicholas and Theresa (Gerhard) Harber, and they settled in Marion 
township in the early days of its development. They were ambitious and 
industrious people and came to be among the well-to-do farmers of their 
community. Mr. Harber bought and sold land and at the time of his 
death was owner of about seven hundred acres in the county, being 
counted among the wealthy men of his community. He was a Democrat, 
active to some extent in party politics, and the family were adherents of 
the Roman Catholic faith, with membership in the local church. More 
extended mention of them and of their children will be found in a 
sketch of Frank J. Harber. Martin Harber was born in Allen county, 



272 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Indiana, November 4, 1852. He acquired his education in the public 
and parochial schools of this county and has engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits practically all his life. For some years, however, he has been living 
retired in Fort Wayne, having won a competency during his active career 
to enjoy a well deserved rest. On June 10, 1880, he married Miss Cath- 
erine Mischo, a daughter of Michael and Catherine Mischo, who came 
from Germany to New York, and thence to Allen county, settling in Fort 
Wayne, w^iere the father was engaged as a stone mason for many years. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Harber were born eight children : Anna M. Clara M., 
Edward N. M., Albert J., Frances M., William G., George C, and Bertha 
M. The mother of this family died September 7, 1900. Llr. Harber, al- 
though retired from active business, is one of the progressive and enter- 
prising men of Allen county, and is numbered with the substantial citi- 
zens of Fort Wayne. He owns two hundred and three acres of well im- 
proved land in Pleasant township as well as a comfortable home in Fort 
Wayne, where he resides. 

Robert F. Harding, a representative of the younger active citizens 
of Fort Wayne, has given freely of his talents and energy to the better- 
ment of his home city. His responsible place in the development of 
the world-famed Fort Wayne plant of the General Electric Company 
has been filled with a degree of completeness which tells plainly of his 
value to this important center of industrial activity. Mr. Harding is a 
native of Logansport, Indiana, where he was born, September 9, 1870. 
He is a son of Daniel F. and Mary A. (Fleming) Harding, who came to 
America from the north of Ireland in 1869. The value of the elder Mr. 
Harding's contribution to the upbuilding of Fort Wajaie is shown by 
the honors bestoM^ed upon him by the people of Fort Wayne in his election 
to the office of mayor. At the beginning of his career, however, Mr. 
Harding, who reached Fort Wayne in the early '70s, found his services 
in demand as a civil engineer, and latterly he was connected in this 
capacity with what is now known as the Lake Erie & Western Railroad 
at the time of its construction. Following his connection with the Lake 
Erie & Western road, he became connected with the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, then known as the Pittsburg, Fort Wajoie and Chicago Railroad, 
and served with this important concern for a period. When he gave up 
railroad work, Mr. Harding entered upon a prosperous career in the 
insurance business in Fort Wayne and became an important factor in 
this field. Mr. Harding's death occurred in 1912. The widow, who has 
devoted her best life to the betterment of those about her, has been a 
leader in many religious efforts for the good of the many. Robert F. 
Harding attended the public schools of Fort Wayne and then was em- 
ployed in a dry goods store as salesman until his true field of effort was 
opened in one of the departments of the present General Electric Com- 
pany's plant, formerly known as the Fort Wayne Jenney Electric Light 
Works, the Fort Wayne Electric Corporation and the Fort Wayne Electric 
Works. After serving in various clerkships, Mr. Harding became the 
superintendent of an important department and has, for several years, 
served as purchasing agent of the company's immense Fort Wayne plant. 

Edward Harper, an honored citizen and representative business man 
of New Haven, Adams township, has been established in the undertaking 
and funeral-directing business in this village for nearly thirty years and 
the enterprise is now conducted under the firm name of Edward Harper 
& Son, his only son being his able coadjutor. The incidental equipment 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 273 

of the Harper undertaking establishment is of the best modern type, 
with scientific embalming facilities and with automobile hearse and ambu- 
lance service. Edward Harper is a native of Allen county and a repre- 
sentative of a family that here settled in the pioneer days — more than 
sixty years ago. He was born on the pioneer farm of his father, in Jef- 
ferson township, and the date of his nativity was March 26, 1855. In 
this county his parents, William and Mary (Hunter) Harper, continued 
to reside until their death, and their names merit enduring place on 
the roll of the sterling pioneers of the county. The father was born in 
Ireland and the mother in Erie County, Pennsylvania. Of their twelve 
children the eldest, Rebecca, died in 1865 ; John was a resident of Allen 
county at the time of his death, in 1913 ; John, Hamilton, James and 
Samuel were gallant soldiers of the Union in the Civil war and all are 
now deceased, as are also William, Hugh, Mary and Matilda; William 
and Mary and Matilda having all died in the year 1854; Edward, the 
immediate subject of this review, was the eleventh in order of birth; 
and Robert Emmett, the youngest of the number, owns and resides on 
the old homestead farm in Jefferson township. The childhood and youth 
of Edward Harper were compassed by the environs and influences of 
the home farm, in the work of which he early began to assist, and in 
the meanwhile he made effective use of the advantages of the public 
schools of the locality and period. After leaving the farm he learned 
the carpenter's trade, to which he continued to devote his attention for 
a period of twelve years. He finally met with a fall that resulted in 
permanent injury to his right hip and prevented his further activities 
as a carpenter and builder. Under these conditions he established his 
home at N6w Haven and engaged in the undertaking business, which has 
continued to receive his attention during the long intervening years, 
the enterprise having been founded by him in March, 1889, and the 
highest standard of service having been maintained at all times. The 
close and sympathetic relations that have been promoted between Mr, 
Harper and the other citizens of the community have given him specially 
secure place in the confidence and esteem of all who know him, and it 
may consistently be said that his circle of friends is limited only by 
that of his acquaintances. His political views are indicated in the loyal 
support which he gives to the cause of the Republican party. On Janu- 
ary 1, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Harper to Miss Martha 
A. Shull, daughter of Jacob and Melinda (McCuUoch) Shull, who were 
well known residents of Grant county until Mrs. Shull's death, when 
the father moved to Jefferson township, and whose three surviving chil- 
dren are Mrs. Florence E. Burkhold, Mrs. Harper and Mrs. Mary Ross, 
of Fort Wayne. Mr. and Mrs. Harper have two children, Emmett E., 
who is associated with his father in business and concerning whom more 
specific mention will be made ; and Etta May, who remains at the parental 
home, being employed as bookkeeper in the office of the Rice Cereal 
Company in Fort Wayne. Emmett E. Harper was born in Jefferson 
township, this county, September 18, 1884, and his early educational 
discipline was acquired in the public schools of New Haven. Later he 
completed a course in the International Business College in the city of 
Fort Wajoie. From the time of initiating his active career he has been 
closely associated with his father in the undertaking business and he is 
the junior member of the firm of Edward Harper & Son, which holds 
license No. 732 issued by the Indiana State Board of Embalmers. October 



274 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

18, 1908, recorded the marriage of Emmett B. Harper to Miss Fannie G. 
Greenawalt, who likewise was born and reared in Allen county and 
who is the eldest of the four children of Oliver J. and Ella (Jackson) 
Greenawalt; Hazel, the second child, is the wife of Mr. Hickner, who holds 
in 1917 the position of principal of the public schools in the city of 
Valparaiso, Indiana ; George R. is principal of the schools of Norway, 
Michigan; and Mary, who remains in Allen county, has likewise made 
an excellent record as a school teacher. Mr. and Mrs. Harper have three 
children — George Edward, Bruce Morris and Mary Elaine. 

Morse Harrod, M. D., has been established in the general practice of 
his profession in the city of Fort Wayne for a quarter of a century and 
is known and honored as one of the able and representative physicians 
and surgeons of his native county, the broad scope of his practice indi- 
cating the high estimate placed upon him as a man and as an exponent 
of his exacting profession. The Doctor was born on a farm in Allen 
county, April 4, 1866, a son of Morgan and Belinda (Beam) Harrod, the 
former of whom was born in Knox count}^, Ohio, August 3, 1826, and the 
-latter in Allen county, Indiana, September 16, 1832, she having here con- 
tinued to maintain her home during the long intervening years and being 
now one of the venerable and revered representatives of a sterling pioneer 
family of the county. Morgan Harrod passed the major part of his life 
in Allen county and was long numbered among the progressive farmers 
and influential citizens, his death having occurred one day prior to the 
eighty-second anniversary of his birth. He passed to the life eternal on 
August 2, 1908, after a life of signal integrity and usefulness. The Har- 
rod family was founded in America in the colonial days and John Harrod, 
an uncle of the late Morgan Harrod, was a patriot soldier in the war of 
the Revolution. Dr. Harrod is of a family of eight sons and three daugh- 
ters, and all of the number are living, except two of the sons. The Doctor 
was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home farm and after he had 
made good use of the advantages of the public schools his ambition led 
him to prepare himself for the profession in which he has achieved dis- 
tinctive success and precedence. He entered the celebrated Eclectic 
Medical College in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, and in this institution 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1891, since which time he has 
been continuously engaged in the general practice of his profession in 
Fort Wayne, where he has also become an interested principal in a num- 
ber of business enterprises of important order. He served as county 
coroner from 1892 to 1896, is a Democrat in his political allegiance, 
has received in the Masonic fraternity the thirty-second degree of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and both he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the Baptist church. On May 31, 1888, was recorded the marriage 
of Dr. Harrod to Miss Jennie L. Lipes, who likewise was born and reared 
in this county, a daughter of D. D. and Mary J. (Somers) Lipes, the former 
of whom is deceased and the latter resides in the city of Fort Wayne. 
Dr. and Mrs. Harrod have three children, concerning whom brief record 
is entered in conclusion of this review : Camilla is the wife of Sidney H. 
Karn and they have one daughter, Jean Elizabeth. Wayne Allen Harrod 
was graduated in the Fort Wajme High School and in the Guggenheim 
Institute of Mining Engineers, at Golden, Colorado, and is now holding a 
responsible position as a mining engineer at Keddie, California. Velma 
June, the youngest of the children, remains at the parental home. 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 275 

Jonathan Hart. — When it is stated that on the 17th of April, 1917, 
this sterling and honored citizen of Monroe township celebrated the 
eightieth anniversary of his birth and that he has been a resident of 
Allen connty since he was a lad of twelve years, it becomes evident that 
he is a representative of one of the county's pioneer families and that 
his memory constitutes a gracious link between the primitive past and the 
twentieth century of opulent prosperity in this now favored section of 
the Hoosier state. Mr. Hart has been one of the world's prolific workers 
and it was entirely through his own ability and efforts that he made his 
way to the place of material prosperity and well merited independence. 
For more than half a century he has maintained his home on his present 
well improved farm, which comprises eighty acres and which is eligibly 
situated in Section 16, Monroe township. This land was largely covered 
with timber when he purchased the property, and his original dwelling 
was a little log house of the primitive type. With the passing years his 
energetic and timely labors brought about the reclamation of his land 
and its development into one of the specific centers of prosperous agri- 
cultural and live-stock industry in the county, the while increasing pros- 
perity was made manifest in the substantial buildings with which he 
improved the place. Now veneral in years, he has given over to others 
the heavy labors and responsibilities that were long his portion, but 
vigorous of mind and physical powers to a degree that gives denial to 
his age, he still takes vital interest in the affairs of his farm and in all 
that concerns the welfare of the township and county to whose develop- 
ment and progress he has contributed his quota. In his farm enterprise 
he achieved special success as a grower and feeder of live stock of all 
kinds and was a leader in the industrial progress of his township, even 
as he has been one of its influential citizens. He is a Democrat in politics 
and served at one time as supervisor of Monroe township. Mr. Hart 
was born in Ashland county, Ohio, April 17, 1837, and is a son of George 
and Sarah (Friedline) Hart, who were natives of Pennsylvania and who 
became early settlers in Ashland county, Ohio, whence they came to 
Indiana and established their home on one of the pioneer and embryonic 
farms of Allen county in the year 1849. Here they passed the remainder 
of their lives, and of their ten children only four are now living. Jona- 
than Hart has profited much from the discipline given in the broad school 
of experience but his specific education was limited to a somewhat irregu- 
lar attendance in the common schools of Ohio. After the family removal 
to Allen county he attended the pioneer schools for brief intervals, 
and in connection with the reclaiming and other work of his father's 
farm he gained full fellowship with arduous toil. He remained at the 
parental home until he had attained to his legal majority and then pur- 
chased his present farm, which he has made one of the valuable places 
of Monroe township. In 1861 Mr. Hart wedded Miss Sarah W. Hines, 
and this devoted wife and helpmeet of his young manhood was his faith- 
ful companion for nearly forty years, the gracious ties being severed 
when she passed to the life eternal, in 1898. They became the parents 
of four children : 0. P., Wayne M., William and Jeanette, all of whom 
are living except the last named. In 1901 Mr. Hart married Mrs. Vir- 
ginia E. (Hines) Gerian, a sister of his first wife and the widow of Jonas 
L. Gerian, and she died in 1904. By her first marriage Mrs. Hart had 
seven children, all of whom are living, namely: Lucy M., Elmer S., 



276 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

Israel M., Daniel H., Wilson P., William, and Clyde E. Of these children 
five now reside in California and two in Michigan. 

Arthur Harter. — In Section 12, Springfield township, is situated the 
finely improved and well ordered farm of Mr, Harter, the same comprising 
one hundred and fifty acres of most fertile and productive land and con- 
stituting one of the valuable rural properties of the county. Mr. Harter 
is a representative of one of the old and honored families of Allen county 
and his maternal grandparents were numbered among the very early 
pioneer settlers of this favored section of the state, where they established 
their home, in Springfield township, in the year 1837. Arthur Harter was 
born on the old homestead farm of his father, in Springfield township, 
and the date of his nativity was November 22, 1862. He is a son of Wil- 
liam and Lucinda (Hall) Harter, both of whom were born in Stark 
county, Ohio, and the latter was but two years old at .the time of her 
parents' removal to Allen county, Indiana, where she was reared under 
the conditions and influences of the pioneer era. William Harter, a scion 
of one of the influential pioneer families of Stark county, Ohio, was there 
reared to adult age and was a young man when he came to Indiana and 
found employment as a moulder in the original Bass foundry, besides 
which he did skillful work as a millwright and expert mechanic along 
other lines. After his marriage he settled on a farm in Springfield town- 
ship, where he developed one of the excellent places of this part of the 
county and continued to reside, a sterling and highly honored citizen, 
until his death, which occurred in February, 1916, his cherished and 
devoted wife having passed to the life eternal May 19, 1895. Of their 
five children the four who survive are Olive Esther, Arthur, Mildred 
Lucinda, and Isaac. Emma, the youngest of the number, died in child- 
hood. The father was a Republican in politics, was influential in con- 
nection with community afi'airs of a public order, and both he and his 
wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Through youthful association with the work of the home farm and 
through his attendance in the public schools of his native toM^nship, 
Arthur Harter waxed strong in physical and mental power and well 
fortified himself for the active duties and responsibilities of life. He 
had continued during the intervening years his close and efl'ective alli- 
ance with the fundamental and all-important industries of agriculture 
and stock-growing, and is known as one of the substantial and aggressive 
exponents of the same in his native county. While he has shown loyal 
interest in all things touching the welfare of his home township and 
county and is a stalwart advocate of the principles of the Republican 
party, he has never desired or held public office. Both he and his wife 
are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Hicksville, and 
he is affiliated with the lodge of Knights of Pythias at Spencerville, 
Dekalb county. On December 24, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Harter to Miss Ella Shutt, Avho was born and reared in this county, 
a daughter of George and Mary Ann (Houk) Shutt, both of whom were 
born in Ohio and were children when the respective parents numbered 
themselves among the pioneer settlers of Allen county. George Shutt 
was the youngest in a family of eight children, and the names of the other 
children are here noted: John, Daniel, Levi, Samuel, Joseph, Jacob and 
William — a remarkable family of sturdy sons. The names of the children 
of George and Mary Ann Shutt are here designated: Gertrude, Hattie, 
Mortimer, Lillie, Ella. Mr. and Mrs. Harter became the parents of two 
children, of whom the elder, Stella, is deceased, and the younger is George 



FORT WAYNE AND AlLEN COUNTY 277 

William, he remaining at the parental home and being an ambitious and 
popular young man who is associated with his father in the work and 
management of the farm. 

Jacob Hartman has been a resident of Allen county from the time 
of his birth, which occurred on the old homestead farm in Marion town- 
ship, September 11, 1862, and after having been for nearly a quarter 
of a century engaged in the retail grocery business in Fort Wayne he 
here, in 1908, established himself in his present business, that of real 
estate and insurance, the insurance department of his enterprise being 
confined largely to fire and casualty indemnity. He has been one of 
the successful business men and public-spirited citizens of Fort Wayne, 
where he is well known and highly esteemed, and since January 1, 1914, 
has served consecutively as councilman at large on the municipal board 
of aldermen. His political allegiance has been exemplified in staunch 
support of the cause of the Democratic party, he and his wife are com- 
municants of St. Mary's Catholic church, and he is an active member of 
the Catholic Benevolent League of Indiana. Joseph Hartman, father 
of the subject of this review, was born in Germany, about the year 1838, 
and was reared and educated in his native land. At the age of eighteen 
years he severed the home ties and set forth to seek his fortunes in 
America. Soon after landing in the United States he made his way to 
Toledo, Ohio, and in that vicinity he found employment at farm work. 
He carefully husbanded his earnings and finallj^ came to Allen county, 
Indiana, and purchased a farm in Marion township. He developed one 
of the valuable farms of that section of the county and was one of its 
specially successful exponents of the basic industries of agriculture and 
stock-growing during the remainder of his long, worthy and useful life, 
his death having occurred October 17, 1899, and his name meriting high 
place on the roll of the sterling pioneers of the county. In 1860 he 
wedded Miss Caroline Hoffman, who was born in the city of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and who died in Fort Wayne March 10, 1915, both holding earnestly 
to the faith of the Catholic church. Of their ten children all are living 
except one. Jacob Hartman, the immediate subject of this sketch, con- 
tinued to be associated in the work and management of the home farm 
until he had attained to his legal majority and in the meanwhile he 
made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of the 
locality. At the age of twenty-two years he became identified with 
mercantile enterprise in Fort Wajaie, and here he conducted a grocery 
store continuously for about twenty-four years. He retired from this 
business in 1908, since which time he has given his attention to the real 
estate and insurance business, as previously noted in this context. In 
1883 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hartman to Miss Anna Anken- 
bruck, a daughter of Bernard and Catherine Ankenbruck, of Fort 
Wayne, and of this union have been born four sons and four daugh- 
ters; Augusta is the wife of Joseph J. Hake, of Fort Wayne; Andrew 
wedded Miss Edith Auer and they reside in this city; and Jacob, 
-Jr., Marie, Elsie, William, Leo and Irma G. remain at the parental home. 

Allen Monroe Hartzell, president of the New Haven State Bank, 
was born in New Haven, Allen county, Indiana, on August 25, 1856, and 
is the son of Levi and Mary (Souders) Hartzell, both of them born in 
Miami county, Ohio. The father came to Allen county in 1840, locating 
in what is now New Haven, where he bought land and devoted himself 
to farming, as well as conducting a grist and saw mill. He died in 1871 



278 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

at the age of fifty-eight years and his widow survived him until January 
5, 1905, when she was aged eighty-five years and five days. Their chil- 
dren were seven in number. Joshua is a resident of Marion, Indiana. 
Elias lives in Hoagland, Indiana. Susan is the wife of Dr. L. L. Null, 
of New Haven. Jennie married T. C. Shilling, of Troy, Ohio. John R. 
lives in New Haven. Allen M. was the next, and Warren S., the seventh 
and youngest child, died at the age of forty years, Allen M. Hartzell 
had his education in the public schools of New Haven and in the old 
Methodist College in Fort Wayne. He taught in the public schools for 
about two years after finishing his studies and then entered the law 
offices of Robert Shatton in Fort Wayne, where he spent seven years. 
From that experience he turned to farming and dairying in his native 
community and that enterprise held his attention successfully until he 
turned his activities to the banking business, with which he has since 
been successfully identified. On December 28, 1881, Mr. Hartzell was 
married to Miss Emmaline Fitch, daughter of Nathaniel Fitch, of Hunter- 
town, Indiana, Mr. Hartzell is a Republican in politics, a thirty-second 
degree Mason, and a Shriner, The New Haven State Bank was organized 
on October 29, 1909, and opened for business December 6, 1909. It opened 
with a capital stock of $25,000, which was increased, in 1916, to $35,000, 
The first president was Allen M. Hartzell and he still holds that office. 
The present board of directors includes H. H. Grubb, Ira B, Sleet, A. M. 
Hartzell, A, R, Schmitker, Josiah Adams, D, B, Nail, and Paul Vonderau, 
and is made up of practically the same body of men who served when 
the bank was first organized, Paul Vonderau succeeded his father on 
the death of the latter, and D, B, Nail serves now in the place of Christ 
Heine, who was a member of the original board. This gives evidence of 
a harmonious organization, and indeed, that element has entered largely 
into the success and growth of the institution. When the bank was 
organized, T, Thimlar was made vice-president, and on January 2, 1915, 
he was succeeded in that office by Herman H. Grubb, who now serves 
in that capacity. The bank building is a commodious structure of brick, 
with two floors and basement, and a floor space of 22 x 58 feet. It is 
thoroughly modern, well equipped, and has every facility for the handling 
of the volume of business that passes through it daily. An idea of the 
growth of the bank mav be gleaned from the following figures: Deposits 
for ]910 were $128,000: in 1911, $178,000: in 1912, $210,000: in 1913, 
$256,000: in 1914, $279,000; in 1915, $298,000: in 1916, $349,000; and in 
1917, $400,000. Its exchange banks are the Fifth Third National Bank 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the First and Hamilton National Bank of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, 

Carl M. Hassold, cashier of the Hoagland State Bank since October, 
1915, is a young man well known in that community. He was horn in 
Huntington, Indiana, on September 25, 1880, and is a son of Rev. Stephen 
and Margaret (Weber) Hassold, The father is of German birth, having 
come to America when a child of four years, and the mother was born 
in Indiana. They lived in Huntington county sixteen years, in DeKalb 
county eighteen years, and for four years have made their home in 
Allen county; and at this writing Reverend Mr. Hassold is pastor of a 
Lutheran church in Madison toAvnship. Their son, Carl M., had his edu- 
cation in the German Lutheran schools of Huntington, Indiana, and in 
the Fort Wayne college, from which he M^as graduated in 1902. He then 
entered Concordia Seminary to study for the ministry and, in 1905, having 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 279 

qualified for the ministry, assumed the pastorate of a Lutheran church 
in Ohio. He spent four years in that state and a similar period in minis- 
terial work in Portland, Oregon. His health failed and he withdrew from 
the ministry. Some months later he returned to Allen county and, in 
October, 1915, was offered the position of cashier of the Hoagland State 
Bank. He accepted the post and has continued to discharge the duties 
of cashier in a capable and altogether satisfactory manner. His success 
may properly be said to be of his own making, for he had little or no 
help in getting his education, and he has worked diligently for such 
benefits as have come his way. Mr. Hassold is Republican in politics and 
is unmarried. 

Fred Hauke has proved himself possessed of that healthy ambition 
that is certain to be fruitful in worthy achievement, and he is now num- 
bered among the successful farmers of Maumee township, where he 
owns and resides upon a fine farm of eighty-four acres, in Section 5, 
besides which he is the owner of another good farm, of eighty acres, 
in Milan township. He was about twenty-five years of age when he 
came from Tiis German fatherland to America, in 1885, and he estab- 
lished his home in Fort Wayne. Here he was employed twelve years 
as a skilled mechanic in a boiler shop, and at the expiration of that 
period he purchased his present homestead farm in Maumee township. 
Much of the land was cleared by him and upon the place he has made 
the best of permanent improvements, including farm buildings, fences, 
tile drainage, etc., the while his success in his farm enterprise has been 
in consonance with his indomitable energy and progressive policies. Mr. 
Hauke was born and reared in Birda, Germany, and is the eldest in a 
family of four children, William having died in 1915 and Henry in 1913, 
and Minnie being a resident of Mindan, Germany. The parents, Christ 
and Minnie (Koene) Hauke, passed their entire lives in Germany. In 
the excellent schools of his native land Fred Hauke received his youthful 
education, and his ambition and self-reliance manifested themselves when 
he set forth to seek his fortune in America, as previously noted. He 
has improved both of his farms and gives his attention to diversified agri- 
culture and to the raising of good types of live stock. He is a Repub- 
lican in his political allegiance, and both he and his wife are active 
members of the Lutheran church. In 1889 Mr. Hauke returned to Ger- 
many, and shortly afterward was there solemnized his mariage to Miss 
Anna Ripper, who accompanied him on his return to America and who 
has proved a devoted helpmeet to him as he has advanced toward the 
goal of prosperity and independence. They have six children — Edward, 
Arthur, Elmer, Anna, Adelia and Freda. 

Fred J. Hayden. — The name of Fred J. Hayden is worthy of a promi- 
nent place in the list of men whose true worth has made Fort Wayne 
and Indiana most clearly entitled to superior recognition. As a man 
devoted to the public interests he contributed generously of his talents 
and ability to further the interests of all the people. As a business man 
his influence tended to raise to a high plane the interests with which 
he was connected. Fred J. Hayden was born at Coburg, in the province 
of Ontario, Canada, the son of Rev. William and Jane (Kirsop) Hayden, 
both natives of England. His parents, ever interested in hig advance- 
ment, provided the means for excellent educational advantages in his 
home town, after which he entered Victoria College, where he was gradu- 
ated as a member of the class of 1864. Two years afterward he was 



280 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

honored by his alma mater with the degree of Master of Arts. Following 
the period of his graduation, Mr. Hayden's abilities while still a youth 
were recognized in his connection with the Cobourg and Marmora Rail- 
way and Mining Company, as its secretary, which position he held for 
a number of years. He resigned his connection with this concern in 1874 
and came directly to Fort Wayne, which was his residence until the 
time of his death, thirty-two years later. He early identified himself with 
the best element of the city in its civic and social life and lost no time 
in taking the steps to qualify as a citizen of the United States. In 1884 
Mr. Hay den was elected as the representative of the people of Allen 
county in the Indiana house of representatives, and here, for two terms, 
he served with signal efficiency. In 1888 still higher appreciation and 
honor was accorded him in his election as state senator to represent 
the counties of Allen and Whitley. At the latter election he was given 
an unusually large and flattering majority, and his capabilities for the 
high office were manifested during the two sessions of his service in the 
senate. As a member of this body he was active in securing the passage 
of the Australian election law, in 1889, and of the new tax law, in 1891. 
These two enactments were considered a splendid advance step in mod- 
ern legislation. Soon after locating in Fort Wayne Mr. Hayden became 
connected prominently with the management of the First National bank 
as a member of its directorate, and he identified himself with the manage- 
ment of a number of large estates in Fort Wayne, a business which he 
conducted with much credit to himself and profit to his clients. When 
the matter of holding the World's Columbian Exposition, in 1893, was 
agitated and when the most dependable and intelligent men of the various 
states were called upon to take an active part in furthering the great 
enterprise, Mr. Hayden was among the first to receive recognition. In 
May, 1891, he was appointed by Governor Hovey as one of the World's 
Fair Commissioners, and in June of the same year, at the initial session 
of the commission, he was unanimously elected treasurer of the Board 
of World's Fair J^.Ianagers of Indiana, which responsible and exacting 
office he filled to the entire satisfaction of the commission and the people 
of his state. It has been very truthfully claimed that it was owing 
to the careful and conservative management of the funds appropriated 
for this magnificent enterprise by the state that Indiana was enabled to 
make such a typical and representative showing and to keep its building 
open until the close of the exposition period. It is worthy of record 
in this connection that when all accounts were finally adjusted and all 
expenses met, Mr. Hayden was enabled to turn back into the state treasury 
nearly two thousand dollars. The selection of Mr. Hayden, a Democrat, 
by Governor Hovey, a Republican, to serve in this connection discloses 
the governor's ability to recognize dependability and public spirit re- 
gardless of party affiliations. As a university graduate, together with 
practical application of the principles learned in the home and in the 
school, Mr. Hayden was particularly well fitted, by reason of his many 
sterling qualities of heart and mind, to fittingly fill the varying positions 
to which he was called. In 1873 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hayden to Miss Eliza Hanna, the only daughter of the late Judge Samuel 
Hanna, for many years recognized as Fort Wayne's foremost citizen, 
and their home on East Lewis street was the scene of much social activity 
during the lifetime of Mr. Hayden. His death occurred December 30, 
1906, and his passing was widely mourned throughout the state. He was 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 281 

a Mason of high degree, and in the matter of church affiliation it should 
be stated that he was reared in the Congregational faith, became a 
member of the Church of England, and when he became a resident of 
Fort Wayne he became a member of the Presbyterian church, in the 
advancement of whose interests he gave much of his time and those more 
material benefits without which any institution prospers but indifferently. 
Owen N. Heaton. — Judge Heaton has played a large and benignant 
role in connection with the civic and material advancement of his native 
county and is a scion of one of the best known and most honored pioneer 
families of Allen county, his paternal grandfather, Jesse Heaton, having 
come from the state of New York to Indiana early in the second decade 
following the admission of the Hoosier commonwealth to the Union. He 
became one of the earliest settlers in Dearborn county, where he ob- 
tained a tract of government land and continued his residence until 1833, 
when he came to Allen county and purchased a tract of three hundred 
and twenty acres of wild land, in what is now Marion township. The 
major part of this tract was covered with heavy timber, the nearest 
neighbors were a band of Indians, under Chief Godfrey, and thus the 
sturdy pioneer was called upon to face the vicissitudes and herculean 
labors that were involved in initiating the development of a farm from 
the primitive wilderness. Jesse Heaton did well his part in furthering 
the social and material development of the county ; here he and his wife 
passed the residue of their lives, and the names of both merit enduring 
place on the roll of the sterling pioneers of the county. Judge Heaton 
of this review has long been numbered among the representative mem- 
bers of the Allen county bar. His activities have not been confined to 
service as a lawyer and jurist but have also touched definitely the civic, 
political and business phases of the county's history, involving special 
prominence in connection with the affairs of the Republican party in 
this section of the state. He effected the organization of the Citizens 
Trust Company of Fort Wayne, of which he is now the president, and 
his has been a dominating influence in developing the same into one 
of the most important financial and fiduciary institutions of northern 
Indiana. Judge Heaton was born on the old homestead farm of his 
father, in Marion township, this county, and the date of his nativity was 
September 2, 1860. He is a son of Jesse and Samantha C. (Larkin) 
Heaton, and his father was long known and honored as one of the most 
substantial and progressive exponents of agricultural and live-stock in- 
dustry in the county, as well as a liberal and public-spirited citizen 
who was specially influential in the furtherance of the cause of the 
Republican party, in the establishing of good schools and in supporting 
all measures and enterprises legitimately advanced for the general good 
of the community. He was the owner of one of the well improved and 
valuable landed estates of Allen county and during the later years of 
his active life gave his attention principally to the raising of live stock 
of superior type. He was a man of indefatigable industry, of broad 
mental ken and of that sterling character that ever compels objective 
confidence and approbation. He was affiliated with the Masonic fra- 
ternity for many years and served as master of the lodge of Ancient 
Free & Accepted Masons in the village of Foe. He was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and his memory is revered by all who came 
within the sphere of his kindly influence. Mr. Heaton passed from the 
stage of life's mortal endeavors in 1889, and his widow resides in Fort 
Wayne, being now in her eighty-fifth year. Concerning their children 



282 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

the following brief data are available: Freeman died in childhood; 
Charles E. was engaged in the successful practice of his profession at 
Fort Wayne and was a skilled physician and surgeon of prominence at 
the time of his death; Margaret D, is a resident of Fort Wayne; Judge 
Heaton of this review was the next in order of birth; Elmer and Etta 
are deceased; Marj^ is the wife of Homer B. Smitley, of Fort Wayne; 
Ellis J. is a successful contractor and builder in Fort Wayne ; Luella May 
resides in Fort Wayne; Benjamin F. is one of the prominent members 
of the Allen county bar and is associated in practice with his brother, 
Owen N., immediate subject of this sketch; and Pearl is the wife of 
George Allen, of Fort Wayne. Judge Heaton found the period of his 
childhood and youth compassed by the invigorating influences and disci- 
pline of the home farm and while attending the public schools continued 
to assist in the work of the farm during the summer vacations. In 1884 
he completed a course in Fort Wayne College, and then began, with 
characteristic energy and ambition, the study of law, under effective 
private preceptorship. He made rapid and assured advancement in the 
assimilation of the science of jurisprudence and, in 1886, was admitted 
to the bar as one eligible for practice in the various courts of Indiana, 
including the federal tribunals in the state. He forthwith engaged in 
active general practice in Fort Wayne, and his powers as a resourceful 
and versatile trial lawyer have been put to many an important test 
through his association with many leading causes brought into litigation 
in the various courts, including the supreme court of the state. He 
continued to give his close attention to his large and representative law 
practice until he was elected to the bench of the superior court of Allen 
county, on which he served from 1902 to 1910 — the longest tenure of 
office that the history of the county records in connection with an in- 
cumbent elected on the Republican ticket. The admirable record of 
Judge Heaton on the bench has become an integral part of the judicial 
history of the county. Upon retiring from the superior bench Judge 
Heaton was made the Republican candidate for representative of this 
district in the United States congress, and though he was unable to over- 
come the large and normal Democratic majority he was defeated by a 
small margin of votes. In 1899 Judge Heaton effected the organization 
of the Citizens' Trust Company of Fort Wayne, which was incorporated 
with a capital of two hundred thousand dollars, and he served as vice- 
president and a director until 1910, when he was elected to his present 
office, that of president. Under his regime as chief executive of this' 
important institution its assets have been increased from five hundred 
thousand to more than two million dollars, this substantial and consecu- 
tive growth designating it as one of the strong and important financial 
institutions of the state. Giving close attention to his executive duties 
in this connection, Judge Heaton still continues in the active practice 
of his profession, with well merited status as one of the strong and 
influential members of the Indiana bar. He is affiliated with both the 
York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity and also with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. 
On August 23, 1889, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Heaton to 
Miss Katherine Russell, daughter of Benton C. and Sarah (Amidon) 
Russell, of Branch county, Michigan, and the one child of this union is 
Miss Dorothy Russell Heaton, who was graduated in the Fort Wayne 



FORT WAYNE AND ALLEN COUNTY 283 

high school and who is, in 1917, a student in Washington College, in the 
city of Washington, D. C. 

Gottlieb H. Heine. — Even the brief data possible of incorporation 
in this sketch will show conclusively that Mr. Heine has proved himself 
a young man of assertive initiative and executive ability, and he is 
consistently to be designated as one of the progressive and valued young 
business men of his native city. He is now president of the Meyer Broth- 
ers Company, which conducts a chain of six well equipped retail drug 
stores, four of which are in the city of Fort Wayne, one at Anderson, 
and one at Kokomo, so that the company is one of the prominent and 
representative concerns in this line of business enterprise in the state. 
Mr. Heine has become influential also in other fields of business, being 
treasurer of the Meridian Amusement Company at Anderson and vice- 
president and treasurer of the company of the same title at Danville, 
Illinois, both operating moving-picture establishments of the best grade. 
Mr. Heine was born in Fort Wayne, January 10, 1878, and is a son of 
Fred W. and Augusta (Stoppenhagen) Heine, the former of whom was 
born in Germany and the latter in Adams county, Indiana. The father 
was for many years a resident of Fort Wayne, where he was long em- 
ployed as a skilled car-builder in the shops of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, and here his death occurred, his widow being still a resident of 
Fort Wayne. Gottlieb H. Heine was afforded the advantages of the 
parochial schools of the Lutheran church in Fort Wayne and here supple- 
mented this discipline by a higher course of study in Concordia College. 
His initial business experience was of clerical order and, in 1897, he 
became stenographer and assistant bookkeeper in the retail drug estab- 
lishment of Meyer Brothers & Company, of which position he continued 
the incumbent three years. He then became a principal in effecting 
the reorganization and expansion of the business, under the present title 
of the Meyer Brothers Company, of which he became treasurer and 
general manager. His resourcefulness and energy resulted in bringing 
to bear most progressive policies in the conducting of the business and, 
about 1910, he became president of the company, of which office he 
has since continued in tenure, this company now having a chain of six 
retail stores, as has previously been noted in this article. Mr. Heine is 
essentially and emphatically a business man and, though he takes loyal 
interest in public affairs, especially those pertaining to his native city, 
he has never had any predilection for public office and is independent in 
his political proclivities. He was reared in the faith of the Lutheran 
church, of which he is a communicant, and is a member of the Fort 
Wayne Commercial Club and the Quest Club. In 1901 was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Heine to Miss Etta Littleton, daughter of Charles J. 
and Maria (Babbitt) Littleton, of Sandusky, Ohio, both of whom are 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Heine have two sons — Harold and Elwood. 

Anthony W. Heit has been identified closely with the industrial and 
commercial interests of Fort Wayne during practically his entire active 
career and is now one of the interested principals in the Heit-Miller-Lau 
Company, which here controls a large and important industrial enterprise 
in the manufacturing of high grade confectionery and specialties. 
Through his own initiative and constructive ability Mr. Heit has gained 
secure vantage-ground as one of the representative business men of 
his native city and for many years has also been quietly influential m 
civic affairs. Mr. Heit was born in Fort Wayne May 23, 1860, and is a 



284 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

son of Anthony and Josephine (Most) Heit, both of whom were born 
in Germany. Anthony W. Heit acquired his rudimentary education in 
the public schools of Fort Wayne but he early became largely dependent 
upon his own resources, as he was but eleven years old at the time of 
his father's death. Thus his broader education has been that gained 
under the preceptorship of that wisest of all head-masters, experience, 
and well has he profited by this discipline. When a lad of fifteen years 
he became identified with the candy-manufacturing business in the city 
of Toledo, Ohio, and with the exception of an interval of three years 
has been concerned with this line of business enterprise during the long 
intervening period. The interval mentioned, from 1878 to 1881, found 
him employed in the Fort Wayne office of the Empire Fast Freight Line, 
and upon severing this association, May 1, 1881, he took a position as 
traveling salesman for the firm of Trentman & Fox, manufacturing con- 
fectioners "and cracker bakers. With this firm and its successors he 
continued his alliance' until September 1, 1902, when he became asso- 
ciated in the purchase of the confectionery department and incidental 
good will of the Fort Wayne branch of the National Biscuit Company, 
and the enterprise has since been successfully conducted under the title 
of the Heit-Miller-Lau Company. Mr. Heit continued "on the road" 
as traveling salesman for the new company until 1907, when he came 
to the house headquarters, where he has since held the position of man- 
ager. In the well equipped factory the company gives employment to a 
force varying from sixty-five to one hundred and twenty-five persons, 
and efficient salesmen are retained in representing the house throughout 
its trade territory — in Indiana, Ohio and Michigan. In addition to his 
connection with this important commercial enterprise Mr. Heit is a 
stockholder and director of the First and Hamilton National Bank of 
Fort Wayne. Taking a lively interest in all that concerns the welfare 
and advancement of his native city and also in public affairs in general, 
Mr. Heit has designated himself an independent Republican in polities, 
but he has had no